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Designing for inclusions helps everyone bryce johnson - infocamp 2012

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Here is the talk I gave at Infocamp 2012. I hope that it is helpful. I will try to add more notes soon.

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Designing for inclusions helps everyone bryce johnson - infocamp 2012

  1. 1. Designing for Inclusions helps everyone :: Bryce Johnson :: Infocamp 2012
  2. 2. Accessibility Camp Seattle
  3. 3. Even I feel likethis some of thetime
  4. 4. Inclusive DesignThe design of mainstream products andservices that are accessible to, and usable by, asmany people as reasonably possible ... withoutthe need for special adaptation or specializeddesign.
  5. 5. No one wantsan old peoplephone
  6. 6. Disability by class and situationCATEGORY INCLUDES (BUT IS NOT LIMITED TO)... SITUATIONALVision Low vision, blindness, Myopia, Zooming in to a webpage on your colorblindness, Glaucoma, Macular phone while you are in direct sunlight Degeneration, CataractsMovement Paralysis, tremors, missing or loss of Trying to click a target that is too small limb, weakness on a phone while riding a bumpy busHearing Hard of hearing, deafness Riding an airplane wearing loose earphones Watching TV in a noisy bar or gymCognitive, reading, Dyslexia, ADHD, low reading level, Search engines, international or youngand learning Stroke, Autism readers Adapted from Universal Design for Web Applications by Wendy Chisholm and Matt May
  7. 7. In 2012 the averagegame player agewas 37 years old, upfrom 30 years old in1995.The average age ofthe most frequentgame purchaser is41 years old.29% of gamers were50 years or older in2011.
  8. 8. MOVEMENT
  9. 9. Movement• Optimize the Flow Order• Be aware of Focus Handling & Context Switching• Create multi-modal experiences
  10. 10. HEARING
  11. 11. Hearing• Provide Captions• Don’t use audio only indicators• Create multi-modal experiences
  12. 12. VISION
  13. 13. Vision• Design with adequate color contrast• Allow users to increase text size and zoom into the UI• Optimize the flow order• Be aware of focus handling & context switching• Provide descriptive labels, appropriate metadata and alternative descriptions• Create multi-modal experiences• Provide descriptive audio for videos
  14. 14. COGNITIVE & LEARNING
  15. 15. Cognitive, reading, and learning• Indicate progress – reminders, progress bars, label each step• Help recover from errors – Defensive Design, clear error messages• Be Consistent• Avoid distractions during tasks• Create multi-modal experiences• Plain language
  16. 16. ThanksBryce Johnson | @brycej
  17. 17. Disability by class and situationCATEGORY INCLUDES (BUT IS NOT LIMITED TO)... SITUATIONALMovement Paralysis, tremors, missing or loss of Trying to click a target that is too small limb, weakness on a phone while riding a bumpy busHearing Hard of hearing, deafness Riding an airplane wearing loose earphones Watching TV in a noisy bar or gymVision Low vision, blindness, Myopia, Zooming in to a webpage on your colorblindness, Glaucoma, Macular phone while you are in direct sunlight Degeneration, CataractsCognitive, reading, Dyslexia, ADHD, low reading level, Search engines, international or youngand learning Stroke, Autism readers Adapted from Universal Design for Web Applications by Wendy Chisholm and Matt May

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