Presentation - Charles Schulz and Charlie Brown

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Presentation - Charles Schulz and Charlie Brown

  1. 2. "These children affect us because they're monsters. They are the monstrous, infantile reductions of all the neuroses of modern citizens of the industrial civilisation." Umberto Eco describing 'Peanuts'
  2. 3. the history of Charles Schulz <ul><li>had an “isolated childhood” </li></ul><ul><li>was drafted into the US Army and was shipped to Europe in World War II </li></ul><ul><li>drew ''Peanuts'' for nearly half a century. He swore that no one else would ever draw the comic strip and he kept his word. For years he drew ''Peanuts'' with a hand tremor. </li></ul>
  3. 4. the first strip
  4. 5. Charles Schulz and Charlie Brown <ul><li>Like Charlie Brown, Schulz’s father was a barber and mother a housewife </li></ul><ul><li>Linus and Shermy were both named for good friends of his </li></ul><ul><li>Lucy was inspired by his first wife </li></ul><ul><li>The strip and Peanuts was intensely personal work for Schulz. </li></ul>
  5. 6. the last strip <ul><li>Peanuts ran for nearly 50 years without interruption and appeared in 2,600 newspapers in 75 countries. </li></ul><ul><li>The last strip ran a day after his death. </li></ul><ul><li>Asked if, for his final Peanuts strip, Charlie Brown would finally kick a football, he responded “ Oh, no! Definitely not! I couldn’t have Charlie Brown kick that football.” </li></ul>
  6. 7. the last strip <ul><li>Schulz ends his farewell letter by saying, &quot;Charlie Brown, Snoopy, Linus, Lucy ... how can I ever forget them ...&quot; </li></ul>
  7. 8. peanuts <ul><li>The most successful and longest running comic strip in newspaper history. </li></ul><ul><li>It had a readership of 344 million in 75 countries </li></ul><ul><li>Peanuts achieved success with it’s television specials and won numerous Emmy Awards </li></ul>
  8. 11. <ul><li>Charlie is Everyman. He wants to get it right. But then there is everybody else. </li></ul><ul><li>An innocent abroad, he does not always get the right message when he observes the world around him. </li></ul><ul><li>Slow to start but ALWAYS there at the finish </li></ul><ul><li>Hounded by Lucy, surprised by the others, still in love with the little red haired girl </li></ul>
  9. 12. <ul><li>Linus would be happiest with his blanket. Someone you can trust. </li></ul><ul><li>Easily lead, he is a ripe picking for the likes of Lucy. </li></ul><ul><li>Philosophical, he will probably end up in a university, lecturing in humanities! </li></ul>
  10. 13. <ul><li>Lucy is the archetypical North American Matriarch – She is ALWAYS RIGHT! Well as far as she is concerned anyway! </li></ul><ul><li>Bossy, pushy, and BEEWDiful! </li></ul><ul><li>Doesn’t suffer fools gladly. Unfortunately, the world is full of them! </li></ul><ul><li>Has a crush on Schroeder (Well isn’t he talented and going to be successful!). Even if he does not understand! </li></ul>
  11. 14. <ul><li>Charlie’s little sister, has a keen sense of justice. And injustice! </li></ul><ul><li>The only one who can really challenge Lucy. She may be younger but she is probably brighter than everyone expect Schroeder. </li></ul>
  12. 15. <ul><li>Serious, talented artiste devoted to his toy piano and Beethoven! </li></ul><ul><li>Served with a clear imagination, this sees Peter Rabbit as the hero Robin Hood! </li></ul><ul><li>A huge challenge to Lucy on all levels! </li></ul>
  13. 16. <ul><li>A great observer of human nature, a philosopher, and amuses himself with his vibrant imagination! </li></ul><ul><li>If they would only remember to fill his supper dish! </li></ul><ul><li>an existential hero in every sense of the term,'' a dog who ''strives, with dogged persistence and unyielding courage, to overcome what seems to be his fate -- that he is a dog.'' </li></ul>
  14. 17. are they children or adults? <ul><li>Schulz himself wrote about fusing adult ideas with a world of small children. </li></ul><ul><li>Time Magazine wrote: “Through his characters, Schulz brought humour to taboo themes such as faith, intolerance, depression, loneliness, cruelty and despair.” </li></ul>
  15. 18. some key points to think about <ul><li>The world exists with no adults or adult authority. </li></ul><ul><li>“Put me in a tie and suit and I’m uncomfortable… I like to watch Mary Poppins. But I work 55 hours a week and a large credit card debt….. I’m a little kid, with grown-up concerns.” </li></ul>
  16. 19. &quot; His characters were contemplative. They spoke with simplicity and force. They made smart observations about literature, art, classical music, theology, medicine, psychiatry, sports and the law.&quot; David Micheaelis of Time Magazine

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