Music Censorship Webquest

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A Web Quest developed for 10th grade English students that encourages critical thought and discussion about the issues surrounding music censorship.

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Music Censorship Webquest

  1. 1. Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] A WebQuest for 10th Grade English Designed by Bryan Stevens [email_address] Based on a template from The WebQuest Page Photo courtesy of StephenMcCleod, Flickr Quest Links
  2. 2. Introduction Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] In the weeks that followed the tragedy of September 11, Clear Channel Communications, a company that owns over 1,000 radio stations across the country, issued a list of 150 songs that could no longer be played on the radio. Although some of the songs were politically charged – Rage Against the Machine had its entire catalogue banned from the airwaves – songs like the Beatles’ “Ticket to Ride” and the Bangles’ “Walk Like an Egyptian” were also banned. Was this move understandable considering the recent tragedy, or was Clear Channel out of line?   This WebQuest activity will encourage you to think critically about this question. You will have the opportunity to step in the shoes of a musician, and argue for the sake of your art. Or, you may decide that censorship is warranted at times, and make your argument as a congressman, judge or radio executive. Photo Courtesy jk5854, Flickr Quest Links
  3. 3. The Task Student Page Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] In this WebQuest, you will be examining both sides of the music censorship issue. You will be researching websites that present pro and anti-censorship viewpoints to prepare you to make an informed argument. You’ll also get the chance to examine a specific case, choose a side, and create a flyer in Microsoft Word that argues your points. By the end of this activity, you will be able to identify pro and anti-censorship arguments. Furthermore, you’ll have a better feel for where you stand on the issue, and if there’s certain instances when you might agree with the opposition. Finally, this WebQuest will help you determine if you believe there are instances when censorship is appropriate or inappropriate. Title Photo Courtesty William Kunz, Flickr Quest Links
  4. 4. The Process Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] <ul><li>Let’s begin by building a background on the subject of music censorship. On the next page, you’ll find a number of links to explore. Follow the instructions below to prepare yourself to make an argument! </li></ul><ul><li>On the next page, you’ll find websites under two headings: Pro Music Censorship and Anti Music Censorship. </li></ul><ul><li>In order to hear both sides of the story, you’ll need to research all of the sites under each heading. Be sure to take notes as you conduct your research, as it will help you form your argument later. (Hint: Make sure your notes are thorough, because they count for a portion of your grade!) </li></ul><ul><li>After you’ve completed your research, visit the sites under the “Case files” heading. Select one case that interests you. </li></ul><ul><li>Next, you get to do some role playing. Pick a side – this may be that of the musician, or a judge, or another interested party specific to your chosen case. </li></ul><ul><li>Now, create a flyer in Microsoft Word that argues your side of the case. Be sure to state your purpose for making the argument (i.e. “To keep my song on the airwaves” or “To prevent impressionable children from hearing satanic lyrics.”) You’ll need to include at least 5 points that support your position. Also, include at least 1 bulleted point that acknowledges the opposition, and argues against it. </li></ul><ul><li>Once your flyer is complete, you’ll be given the opportunity to present to class. </li></ul>Quest Links Photo courtesy Pink_Fish 13, Flickr
  5. 5. Quest Links Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Quest Links Pro-Censorship Anti-Censorship Case Files Balanced Sites University of Texas Pro-Censorship Pro-Censorship Article on Essortment University of Texas Anti-Censorship Freemuse Neil Strauss on the Clear Channel Controversy Music Censorship on Geocities Cases on Freemuse Cases on the National Coalition Against Censorship Photo Courtesy Arohilla, Flickr
  6. 6. Evaluation Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Quest Links Proficient 4 Partially Proficient 3 Developing 2 Emerging 1 Score Research/ Statistical Data Students include 5 or more high-quality examples or pieces of data to support their argument. Students include at least 4 high-quality examples or pieces of data to support their argument. Students include at least 3 high-quality examples or pieces of data to support their argument. Students include fewer than 2 high-quality examples or pieces of data to support their argument. Notes Notes are recorded and organized in an extremely neat and orderly fashion. Notes are recorded legibly and are somewhat organized. Notes are recorded. Notes are recorded only with peer/teacher assistance and reminders. Presentation Presentation of censorship issue shows a full understanding of the topic. Presentation of censorship issue shows a good understanding of the topic. Presentation of censorship issue shows a good understanding of parts of the topic. Presentation of censorship issue does not seem to reflect an understanding of the topic. Understanding of Opposition Flyer/Presentation shows a full understanding of the opposition's argument. Flyer/Presentation shows a good understanding of the opposition's argument. Flyer/Presentation shows a good understanding of parts of the opposition's argument. Flyer/Presentation does not reflect an understanding of the opposition's argument.
  7. 7. Conclusion Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] After conducting your research, do you have a better feel for where you stand on the Clear Channel issue described at the beginning of this WebQuest? After examining your case and listening to classroom presentations, do you think that in some instances censorship is necessary? As Americans, we’ve been given great freedoms by the constitution. It’s up to us to ensure that not only are these freedoms defended, but that they are used in a responsible manner. Quest Links
  8. 8. Credits & References Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] All photos licensed Creative Commons, courtesy of Flickr Rage Against the Machine, courtesy Stephen McLeod Shattered Record, courtesy William Kunz City Hall Courtroom, courtesy Pink_Fish13 Fender Stratocaster, courtesy Arohilla WebQuest templates and training materials: The WebQuest Page The WebQuest Slideshare Group Quest Links
  9. 9. Censorship in Music (Teacher Pages) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page A WebQuest for 10th Grade English Designed by Bryan Stevens [email_address] Based on a template from The WebQuest Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  10. 10. Introduction (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This lesson was developed as a part of an Education Technology class at Colorado State University in the fall of 2008. ‘ Censorship in Music’ was originally intended as a single lesson in a larger unit on the media. One of the overarching goals of a unit like this is to heighten student awareness about the ubiquity of media messages, and the range of ways in which they are used to manipulate public perception. “Censorship in Music” directs students’ attention to an ongoing controversy in the music world, and asks them to question whether or not music censorship is appropriate in some situations. Students actively research viewpoints on both sides of the spectrum, and are asked to take a side. It is the goal of this lesson to engage students in a critical discussion about censorship and the consequences it has the potential to create. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  11. 11. Learners (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This lesson was intended for 10 th grade English students. It relies heavily on popular culture to generate student interest and create an informative discussion. The lesson could easily be extended to the 8 th or 9 th grade levels, but since censorship is a controversial topic, it may be wise to seek parental approval first. Students will need a basic knowledge of Microsoft Word to create the Flyer in this lesson. Most of the content-related questions can either be answered by the teacher, or the Web Quest itself. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  12. 12. Curriculum Standards (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page <ul><li>This lesson addresses the following standards: </li></ul><ul><li>Colorado Reading and Writing Standards 4.3 and 4.4: </li></ul><ul><li>recognize, express, and defend points of view orally and in writing; </li></ul><ul><li>identify the purpose, perspective, and historical and cultural influences of a </li></ul><ul><li>speaker, author, or director; </li></ul><ul><ul><li>. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Students will be examining the viewpoints of musicians, policy makers and other concerned parties in the area of music censorship. During the WebQuest, they will be engaged with identifying the purpose of authors from multiple sides of the issue, and will be asked to think critically about censorship in order to form their own opinion. </li></ul>Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  13. 13. The Process (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion <ul><li>Let’s begin by building a background on the subject of music censorship. On the next page, you’ll find a number of links to explore. Follow the instructions below to prepare yourself to make an argument! </li></ul><ul><li>On the next page, you’ll find websites under two headings: Pro Music Censorship and Anti Music Censorship. </li></ul><ul><li>In order to hear both sides of the story, you’ll need to research all of the sites under each heading. Be sure to take notes as you conduct your research, as it will help you form your argument later. (Hint: Make sure your notes are thorough, because they count for a portion of your grade!) </li></ul><ul><li>After you’ve completed your research, visit the sites under the “Case files” heading. Select one case that interests you. </li></ul><ul><li>Next, you get to do some role playing. Pick a side – this may be that of the musician, or a judge, or another interested party specific to your chosen case. </li></ul><ul><li>Now, create a flyer in Microsoft Word that argues your side of the case. Be sure to state your purpose for making the argument (i.e. “To keep my song on the airwaves” or “To prevent impressionable children from hearing satanic lyrics.”) You’ll need to include at least 5 points that support your position. Also, include at least 1 bulleted point that acknowledges the opposition, and argues against it. </li></ul><ul><li>Once your flyer is complete, you’ll be given the opportunity to present to class. </li></ul>Ideally, this WebQuest should take place over three 50 minute class periods. (Day 1: Introduction/Research Day 2: Research/Flyer Design Day 3: Presentations/Discussion.) Of course, more time may be necessary, depending on how much time Flyer design takes. While this lesson should be easy enough for a novice teacher, some experience in leading respectful classroom discussions about controversial topics would be a plus. If possible, allow time for student discussion after each presentation. If students need some guidance in their note-taking, ask them to be attentive to what the viewpoints on both sides of the issue are. In addition, ask them to think about what the authors purpose(s) may be. Microsoft Word offers several templates for Flyers – if students aren’t familiar with formatting and design in Word, encourage them to use one of these.
  14. 14. Resources (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page <ul><li>Here’s what you’ll need: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Access to Computer Lab </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Microsoft Word or other Word Processing software (as many licenses as there are students, ideally.) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Optional: A document camera or digital projector and screen to view student Flyers. (If these aren’t available, students can pass around a copy of their Flyer as they present their material. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>One teacher can easily implement this lesson, however, it would be helpful to have a few aides or parents in the room to help with tech. issues and maintain student focus. </li></ul>Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  15. 15. Evaluation (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page How will you know that this lesson was successful? Describe what student products or performances you'll be looking at and how they'll be evaluated. This, of course, should be tightly related to the standards and objectives you cited above. You may want to just copy and paste the evaluation section of the student page ( Evaluation ) into this space and add any clarifications needed for another teacher to make use of this lesson. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion In addition to the flyer, students will be handing in their research notes and delivering a brief presentation on their chosen music censorship issue. The above evaluation will help determine the overall quality of the total package. Students should be able to identify the purpose(s) underlying both sides of their chosen issue, and will need to demonstrate critical thought in choosing a role and arguing their case on the flyer. Proficient 4 Partially Proficient 3 Developing 2 Emerging 1 Score Research/ Statistical Data Students include 5 or more high-quality examples or pieces of data to support their argument. Students include at least 4 high-quality examples or pieces of data to support their argument. Students include at least 3 high-quality examples or pieces of data to support their argument. Students include fewer than 2 high-quality examples or pieces of data to support their argument. Notes Notes are recorded and organized in an extremely neat and orderly fashion. Notes are recorded legibly and are somewhat organized. Notes are recorded. Notes are recorded only with peer/teacher assistance and reminders. Presentation Presentation of censorship issue shows a full understanding of the topic. Presentation of censorship issue shows a good understanding of the topic. Presentation of censorship issue shows a good understanding of parts of the topic. Presentation of censorship issue does not seem to reflect an understanding of the topic. Understanding of Opposition Flyer/Presentation shows a full understanding of the opposition's argument. Flyer/Presentation shows a good understanding of the opposition's argument. Flyer/Presentation shows a good understanding of parts of the opposition's argument. Flyer/Presentation does not reflect an understanding of the opposition's argument.
  16. 16. Teacher Script (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page <ul><li>It’s possible to use this lesson with English Language Learners or in classrooms that don’t have adequate computing resources. Follow this script for guidance in these situations. </li></ul><ul><li>Introduction: Read the intro that details the clear channel controversy. Ask students for their initial impressions on this issue. If you have access to a CD player, iTunes, or an iPod with speakers, it may be interesting to play a few banned songs for students, followed by a brief discussion. For a list of songs that Clear Channel banned, go to: http://radio.about.com/library/weekly/blCCbannedsongs.htm . This step shouldn’t last more than 5 minutes, unless you extend it with the music. Then, plan on 15 minutes. </li></ul><ul><li>The Task: The text from the slide should help the students understand what they will be doing. If further clarification is needed, explain to students that you will be guiding them through research that will help them form an educated opinion on music censorship. This step should take no more than 2-3 minutes. </li></ul><ul><li>The Process: Lead students through a step-by-step description of the Web Quest, and what will be expected of them. If you’re executing the web quest from a single computer, tell students that you will be exploring pro and anti music censorship websites together, and that they need to take notes on the various viewpoints from both sides of the issue. Once again, if only one computer is available, students won’t be able to pick their own music censorship case to make a flyer on. As an alternative activity, look at 2 or 3 cases in class, and have students choose one. If students do not have access to Microsoft Word or other word processing resources, have them create their flyer by hand using construction or butcher paper. Because presentations on just a few specific music censorship cases may become monotonous, consider holding a 20-25 minute discussion about each issue where student participation is graded. The explanation on the process page should take no more than 5 minutes. </li></ul><ul><li>Quest Links: If you’re leading the Web Quest from one computer, alternate between pro, anti and balanced music censorship links. Remind students that they need to be taking notes on the various viewpoints found on the websites, and allow students to ask questions during the research to clarify any confusion. This is the ‘meat’ of the Web Quest, so plan on this step (researching the sites, examining specific cases) to last an entire 50 minute class period. </li></ul>Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  17. 17. Conclusion (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page It is important that we engage students with issues that are close to their hearts. By presenting them with this WebQuest on Music Censorship, students will be gaining experience in conducting research, examining multiple viewpoints and thinking critically in order to form their own opinions. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  18. 18. Credits & References (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page All photos licensed Creative Commons, courtesy of Flickr Rage Against the Machine, courtesy Stephen McLeod Shattered Record, courtesy William Kunz City Hall Courtroom, courtesy Pink_Fish13 Fender Stratocaster, courtesy Arohilla WebQuest templates and training materials: The WebQuest Page The WebQuest Slideshare Group Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion

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