Understanding the new breed of digital donors and how to maximise your fundraising  through their networks Bryan Miller He...
<ul><li>Bryan Miller </li></ul><ul><li>(Former) Head of Strategy & Consumer Insight at Cancer Research UK </li></ul><ul><l...
Understanding the new breed  of digital donors and how to maximise  your fundraising  through  their networks
Don’t worry We’re all in much the same boat! How best to capitalise on the opportunities offered by social media as part o...
Let’s begin… with a (true) story
It all began… Jenni Ware Carolee Hazzard …  with a lost purse
Realtime community storytelling
$93 is now $22,000! And looks set to continue growing  - thanks to the multiplier effect of social network fundraising
Trader Joe’s also donated over 350lbs of groceries - nice!
<ul><li>Donations continue being made at the Second Harvest site </li></ul><ul><li>but it really doesn’t have anything lik...
 
http://flickr.com/photos/kaptainkobold/195999767
The moral of this story? Donors are doing it for themselves!
Donors are doing it for themselves! <ul><li>Second Harvest didn’t approach Carolee to ask her to support them - her Facebo...
So… what is our role in all this?
Our traditional role
Within the 4-Cs of  social network fundraising Our new role… Community Commodity Cause Impact Content
The first ‘C’ = Community Community <ul><li>The ‘new breed’ of digital donors - like Carolee Hazzard - have their own onli...
One social network to rule them all? http://www.buzzpoint.com/
<ul><li>The online world got excited when Facebook hit 250m users in July 2009 </li></ul><ul><li>By September 2009 it was ...
<ul><li>All of which means that earlier this month it passed Yahoo! to take second place in the global ranking of sites by...
<ul><li>However, on a country-by-country basis things can look very different </li></ul><ul><li>Facebook is only 10th in H...
<ul><li>You can check the profile of Facebook users in your own country at checkfacebook.com </li></ul>http://www.checkfac...
One social network to rule them all? http://www.techcrunch.com/2008/06/23/modeling-the-real-market-value-of-social-network...
The second ‘C’ = Commodity Commodity <ul><li>The rise of free Social Network sites like Facebook, YouTube, etc - plus easy...
The second ‘C’ = Commodity Commodity Vs
The third ‘C’ = Content <ul><li>Great fundraisers are great storytellers - bringing the cause and the opportunity to make ...
The third ‘C’ = Content <ul><li>There are times when we can help these supporters tell better stories - particularly when ...
The fourth ‘C’ = Cause Impact <ul><li>This is why we do what we do - to make a real difference in the world around us </li...
Getting to know the new breed
Getting to know the new breed <ul><li>Insight from Cancer Research UK supporter research undertaken early 2009 as part of ...
Getting to know the new breed Online activities
<ul><li>Email usage only really starts to tail-off at 65+ - and almost one third of 75+ use it  </li></ul>
<ul><li>Online shopping peaks across the 18 to 54 age bands </li></ul><ul><li>Less than 1 in 5 75+ supporters shop online ...
<ul><li>Online banking peaks in the 25-34 age group - with fairly rapid decline beyond that </li></ul>
<ul><li>Overall 40% of our supporters have donated to a charity online </li></ul><ul><li>Again, 25-34 sees the peak - at a...
<ul><li>Data for ‘Sponsored a Friend Online’ similar to overall online donation </li></ul><ul><li>However the youngest age...
<ul><li>Online event sign-up relatively equal across <18 through 44 </li></ul><ul><li>Understandably lowest in the 75+ age...
<ul><li>Supporters using social networks reflect the overall UK norm - over 50% under 35 then decline </li></ul><ul><li>Bu...
<ul><li>Overall just 5% of our supporters said they had used social networks to interact with a charity - compared to over...
Getting to know the new breed Advocacy
<ul><li>Overall around one third of our supporters say they actively encourage others to support - which is brilliant!  </...
<ul><li>Quite a lot more are happy to talk about their own support for us, but don’t actively encourage others to do the s...
<ul><li>And a significant number would consider talking about their support for us </li></ul><ul><li>Interestingly, consid...
<ul><li>A trend confirmed here - with older donors more likely to display a belief that their giving is private  </li></ul>
<ul><li>An even stronger age-related trend to the belief that giving is a private thing shown here  </li></ul>
Getting to know the new breed <ul><li>Details of Just Giving research </li></ul><ul><ul><li>People were prompted to take s...
Is this your first online donation?
Which gender is giving more?
What’s the spread of ages by gender?
How much do people donate online?
Donation share vs revenue share
Key stats 25% Percentage (in revenue) that comes from donors over 45 who donate more than £50 Percentage (in revenue) that...
Donation spread by age and gender
Donation spread by age and gender
How do you help these people? accessible targeted advertise user-friendly integrate online/offline email
What was the source of the donation ask?
Let’s look at the trends...
Is email use increasing or decreasing? http://icanhaz.com/emailstats
Do the tools used vary depending on age?
Facebook – where the new breed lives <ul><ul><li>60% </li></ul></ul>Percentage of Facebook visits from Facebook home page ...
Who is using Facebook Connect?
Facebook Connect
Who is using Facebook Connect?
Community fundraising through Twitter http://twitter.com/serafinowicz/status/1321093848
Community fundraising through Twitter 14% of referrals on 13 th  March to JustGiving were from Twitter www.justgiving.com/...
Fundraising through Twitter – micro donations 1,106 donations £4.86 average Current total: £5,396.07
So what does this all mean? Different segments require different channels, as well as different messages Ignore your older...
The moral of this story? Donors are doing it for themselves!
The 365 Challenge www.365challenge.co.uk & @365er
This is Colin’s story “ In 2007, I was diagnosed with a soft tissue sarcoma and underwent surgery, followed by radiotherap...
Colin’s strategy
Colin’s strategy “ With a group, I found that I could engage with a target audience  who had expressed an interest in what...
The ripple effect…
What would’ve helped Colin guidance on how following someone can give you access to their followers too  changing your Fac...
The new breed “ As I posted Tweets about hitting milestones or new blogs, these connections were Re-Tweeting them, and my ...
<ul><li>Contact us </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Bryan Miller </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>[email_address]   </li></ul></ul><ul><ul>...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Understanding the new breed of digital donors and how to maximise your fundraising through their networks

2,679 views

Published on

Presentation I gave with Jonathan Waddingham of JustGiving at the International Fundraising Congress, Holland October 2009

Published in: Business, Technology
0 Comments
4 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,679
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
712
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
4
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • How
  • How
  • How
  • How
  • How
  • How
  • At CRUK we are incredibly fortunate to be supported by a generous and very diverse range of supporters, with some 2million+ giving us some form of financial support over the last couple of years - from traditional cash appeals, direct debits, legacy donations, etc. to 750k women taking part in our Race for Life 5k sponsored event and all manner of other activities.
  • At CRUK we are incredibly fortunate to be supported by a generous and very diverse range of supporters, with some 2million+ giving us some form of financial support over the last couple of years - from traditional cash appeals, direct debits, legacy donations, etc. to 750k women taking part in our Race for Life 5k sponsored event and all manner of other activities.
  • http://blog.nielsen.com/nielsenwire/consumer/global-advertising-consumers-trust-real-friends-and-virtual-strangers-the-most/ Recommendations from personal acquaintances or opinions posted by consumers online are the most trusted forms of advertising, according to the latest Nielsen Global Online Consumer Survey of over 25,000 Internet consumers from 50 countries. Ninety percent or consumers surveyed noted that they trust recommendations from people they know, while 70 percent trusted consumer opinions posted online. “ The explosion in Consumer Generated Media over the last couple of years means consumers’ reliance on word of mouth in the decision-making process, either from people they know or online consumers they don’t, has increased significantly,” says Jonathan Carson, President of Online, International, for the Nielsen Company.” However, in this new age of consumer control, advertisers will be encouraged by the fact that brand websites are trusted at that same 70 percent level as online consumer opinions. Carson adds, “We see that all forms of advertiser-led advertising, except ads in newspapers, have also experienced increases in levels of trust and it’s possible that the CGM revolution has forced advertisers to use a more realistic form of messaging that is grounded in the experience of consumers rather than the lofty ideals of the advertisers.” Brands Gaining Global Trust… In Some Regions More Than Others In the two years the biannual study has been conducted, brand sponsorship has seen the greatest increase in levels of trust from 49 percent of Internet consumers in April 2007 to 64 percent in April 2009. Regionally, Latin American countries lead the way with 81 percent of both Colombian and Venezuelan Internet consumers and 79 percent of Brazilians trusting brand sponsorships. In contrast, sponsorships hold the least sway amongst Swedish (33 percent), Latvian (36 percent) and Finnish online consumers (38 percent). In comparison, 72 percent of United States Internet consumers trust brand sponsorships, placing the United States 12th out of the 50 countries represented in the survey. Brand websites, globally the most trusted form of advertiser-led advertising, hold the greatest sway in China (82 percent). Following China are Pakistan (81 percent) and Vietnam (80 percent). However, brand websites tend to be trusted least amongst Swedish (40 percent) and Israeli (45 percent) Internet consumers. In the US, 62 percent of Internet consumers said they trusted brand sponsorships, placing the United States 21st out of the 50 countries surveyed. “ The regional differences provide a clear guide to advertisers as to how they should focus their ad strategy in different countries. It also shows that, despite the authority of word of mouth when it comes to consumer decision-making, advertisers still have a major say in the process. This is backed up by past Nielsen studies which showed that the majority of people posting comments online went to the advertiser website or emailed feedback to the company before they posted. The website, and monitoring feedback through it, is a golden opportunity for advertisers to shape the tone and content of consumer opinion before it reaches the digital masses,” said Carson.
  • http://blog.nielsen.com/nielsenwire/consumer/global-advertising-consumers-trust-real-friends-and-virtual-strangers-the-most/ Recommendations from personal acquaintances or opinions posted by consumers online are the most trusted forms of advertising, according to the latest Nielsen Global Online Consumer Survey of over 25,000 Internet consumers from 50 countries. Ninety percent or consumers surveyed noted that they trust recommendations from people they know, while 70 percent trusted consumer opinions posted online. “ The explosion in Consumer Generated Media over the last couple of years means consumers’ reliance on word of mouth in the decision-making process, either from people they know or online consumers they don’t, has increased significantly,” says Jonathan Carson, President of Online, International, for the Nielsen Company.” However, in this new age of consumer control, advertisers will be encouraged by the fact that brand websites are trusted at that same 70 percent level as online consumer opinions. Carson adds, “We see that all forms of advertiser-led advertising, except ads in newspapers, have also experienced increases in levels of trust and it’s possible that the CGM revolution has forced advertisers to use a more realistic form of messaging that is grounded in the experience of consumers rather than the lofty ideals of the advertisers.” Brands Gaining Global Trust… In Some Regions More Than Others In the two years the biannual study has been conducted, brand sponsorship has seen the greatest increase in levels of trust from 49 percent of Internet consumers in April 2007 to 64 percent in April 2009. Regionally, Latin American countries lead the way with 81 percent of both Colombian and Venezuelan Internet consumers and 79 percent of Brazilians trusting brand sponsorships. In contrast, sponsorships hold the least sway amongst Swedish (33 percent), Latvian (36 percent) and Finnish online consumers (38 percent). In comparison, 72 percent of United States Internet consumers trust brand sponsorships, placing the United States 12th out of the 50 countries represented in the survey. Brand websites, globally the most trusted form of advertiser-led advertising, hold the greatest sway in China (82 percent). Following China are Pakistan (81 percent) and Vietnam (80 percent). However, brand websites tend to be trusted least amongst Swedish (40 percent) and Israeli (45 percent) Internet consumers. In the US, 62 percent of Internet consumers said they trusted brand sponsorships, placing the United States 21st out of the 50 countries surveyed. “ The regional differences provide a clear guide to advertisers as to how they should focus their ad strategy in different countries. It also shows that, despite the authority of word of mouth when it comes to consumer decision-making, advertisers still have a major say in the process. This is backed up by past Nielsen studies which showed that the majority of people posting comments online went to the advertiser website or emailed feedback to the company before they posted. The website, and monitoring feedback through it, is a golden opportunity for advertisers to shape the tone and content of consumer opinion before it reaches the digital masses,” said Carson.
  • http://blog.nielsen.com/nielsenwire/consumer/global-advertising-consumers-trust-real-friends-and-virtual-strangers-the-most/ Recommendations from personal acquaintances or opinions posted by consumers online are the most trusted forms of advertising, according to the latest Nielsen Global Online Consumer Survey of over 25,000 Internet consumers from 50 countries. Ninety percent or consumers surveyed noted that they trust recommendations from people they know, while 70 percent trusted consumer opinions posted online. “ The explosion in Consumer Generated Media over the last couple of years means consumers’ reliance on word of mouth in the decision-making process, either from people they know or online consumers they don’t, has increased significantly,” says Jonathan Carson, President of Online, International, for the Nielsen Company.” However, in this new age of consumer control, advertisers will be encouraged by the fact that brand websites are trusted at that same 70 percent level as online consumer opinions. Carson adds, “We see that all forms of advertiser-led advertising, except ads in newspapers, have also experienced increases in levels of trust and it’s possible that the CGM revolution has forced advertisers to use a more realistic form of messaging that is grounded in the experience of consumers rather than the lofty ideals of the advertisers.” Brands Gaining Global Trust… In Some Regions More Than Others In the two years the biannual study has been conducted, brand sponsorship has seen the greatest increase in levels of trust from 49 percent of Internet consumers in April 2007 to 64 percent in April 2009. Regionally, Latin American countries lead the way with 81 percent of both Colombian and Venezuelan Internet consumers and 79 percent of Brazilians trusting brand sponsorships. In contrast, sponsorships hold the least sway amongst Swedish (33 percent), Latvian (36 percent) and Finnish online consumers (38 percent). In comparison, 72 percent of United States Internet consumers trust brand sponsorships, placing the United States 12th out of the 50 countries represented in the survey. Brand websites, globally the most trusted form of advertiser-led advertising, hold the greatest sway in China (82 percent). Following China are Pakistan (81 percent) and Vietnam (80 percent). However, brand websites tend to be trusted least amongst Swedish (40 percent) and Israeli (45 percent) Internet consumers. In the US, 62 percent of Internet consumers said they trusted brand sponsorships, placing the United States 21st out of the 50 countries surveyed. “ The regional differences provide a clear guide to advertisers as to how they should focus their ad strategy in different countries. It also shows that, despite the authority of word of mouth when it comes to consumer decision-making, advertisers still have a major say in the process. This is backed up by past Nielsen studies which showed that the majority of people posting comments online went to the advertiser website or emailed feedback to the company before they posted. The website, and monitoring feedback through it, is a golden opportunity for advertisers to shape the tone and content of consumer opinion before it reaches the digital masses,” said Carson.
  • http://blog.nielsen.com/nielsenwire/consumer/global-advertising-consumers-trust-real-friends-and-virtual-strangers-the-most/ Recommendations from personal acquaintances or opinions posted by consumers online are the most trusted forms of advertising, according to the latest Nielsen Global Online Consumer Survey of over 25,000 Internet consumers from 50 countries. Ninety percent or consumers surveyed noted that they trust recommendations from people they know, while 70 percent trusted consumer opinions posted online. “ The explosion in Consumer Generated Media over the last couple of years means consumers’ reliance on word of mouth in the decision-making process, either from people they know or online consumers they don’t, has increased significantly,” says Jonathan Carson, President of Online, International, for the Nielsen Company.” However, in this new age of consumer control, advertisers will be encouraged by the fact that brand websites are trusted at that same 70 percent level as online consumer opinions. Carson adds, “We see that all forms of advertiser-led advertising, except ads in newspapers, have also experienced increases in levels of trust and it’s possible that the CGM revolution has forced advertisers to use a more realistic form of messaging that is grounded in the experience of consumers rather than the lofty ideals of the advertisers.” Brands Gaining Global Trust… In Some Regions More Than Others In the two years the biannual study has been conducted, brand sponsorship has seen the greatest increase in levels of trust from 49 percent of Internet consumers in April 2007 to 64 percent in April 2009. Regionally, Latin American countries lead the way with 81 percent of both Colombian and Venezuelan Internet consumers and 79 percent of Brazilians trusting brand sponsorships. In contrast, sponsorships hold the least sway amongst Swedish (33 percent), Latvian (36 percent) and Finnish online consumers (38 percent). In comparison, 72 percent of United States Internet consumers trust brand sponsorships, placing the United States 12th out of the 50 countries represented in the survey. Brand websites, globally the most trusted form of advertiser-led advertising, hold the greatest sway in China (82 percent). Following China are Pakistan (81 percent) and Vietnam (80 percent). However, brand websites tend to be trusted least amongst Swedish (40 percent) and Israeli (45 percent) Internet consumers. In the US, 62 percent of Internet consumers said they trusted brand sponsorships, placing the United States 21st out of the 50 countries surveyed. “ The regional differences provide a clear guide to advertisers as to how they should focus their ad strategy in different countries. It also shows that, despite the authority of word of mouth when it comes to consumer decision-making, advertisers still have a major say in the process. This is backed up by past Nielsen studies which showed that the majority of people posting comments online went to the advertiser website or emailed feedback to the company before they posted. The website, and monitoring feedback through it, is a golden opportunity for advertisers to shape the tone and content of consumer opinion before it reaches the digital masses,” said Carson.
  • http://blog.nielsen.com/nielsenwire/consumer/global-advertising-consumers-trust-real-friends-and-virtual-strangers-the-most/ Recommendations from personal acquaintances or opinions posted by consumers online are the most trusted forms of advertising, according to the latest Nielsen Global Online Consumer Survey of over 25,000 Internet consumers from 50 countries. Ninety percent or consumers surveyed noted that they trust recommendations from people they know, while 70 percent trusted consumer opinions posted online. “ The explosion in Consumer Generated Media over the last couple of years means consumers’ reliance on word of mouth in the decision-making process, either from people they know or online consumers they don’t, has increased significantly,” says Jonathan Carson, President of Online, International, for the Nielsen Company.” However, in this new age of consumer control, advertisers will be encouraged by the fact that brand websites are trusted at that same 70 percent level as online consumer opinions. Carson adds, “We see that all forms of advertiser-led advertising, except ads in newspapers, have also experienced increases in levels of trust and it’s possible that the CGM revolution has forced advertisers to use a more realistic form of messaging that is grounded in the experience of consumers rather than the lofty ideals of the advertisers.” Brands Gaining Global Trust… In Some Regions More Than Others In the two years the biannual study has been conducted, brand sponsorship has seen the greatest increase in levels of trust from 49 percent of Internet consumers in April 2007 to 64 percent in April 2009. Regionally, Latin American countries lead the way with 81 percent of both Colombian and Venezuelan Internet consumers and 79 percent of Brazilians trusting brand sponsorships. In contrast, sponsorships hold the least sway amongst Swedish (33 percent), Latvian (36 percent) and Finnish online consumers (38 percent). In comparison, 72 percent of United States Internet consumers trust brand sponsorships, placing the United States 12th out of the 50 countries represented in the survey. Brand websites, globally the most trusted form of advertiser-led advertising, hold the greatest sway in China (82 percent). Following China are Pakistan (81 percent) and Vietnam (80 percent). However, brand websites tend to be trusted least amongst Swedish (40 percent) and Israeli (45 percent) Internet consumers. In the US, 62 percent of Internet consumers said they trusted brand sponsorships, placing the United States 21st out of the 50 countries surveyed. “ The regional differences provide a clear guide to advertisers as to how they should focus their ad strategy in different countries. It also shows that, despite the authority of word of mouth when it comes to consumer decision-making, advertisers still have a major say in the process. This is backed up by past Nielsen studies which showed that the majority of people posting comments online went to the advertiser website or emailed feedback to the company before they posted. The website, and monitoring feedback through it, is a golden opportunity for advertisers to shape the tone and content of consumer opinion before it reaches the digital masses,” said Carson.
  • http://blog.nielsen.com/nielsenwire/consumer/global-advertising-consumers-trust-real-friends-and-virtual-strangers-the-most/ Recommendations from personal acquaintances or opinions posted by consumers online are the most trusted forms of advertising, according to the latest Nielsen Global Online Consumer Survey of over 25,000 Internet consumers from 50 countries. Ninety percent or consumers surveyed noted that they trust recommendations from people they know, while 70 percent trusted consumer opinions posted online. “ The explosion in Consumer Generated Media over the last couple of years means consumers’ reliance on word of mouth in the decision-making process, either from people they know or online consumers they don’t, has increased significantly,” says Jonathan Carson, President of Online, International, for the Nielsen Company.” However, in this new age of consumer control, advertisers will be encouraged by the fact that brand websites are trusted at that same 70 percent level as online consumer opinions. Carson adds, “We see that all forms of advertiser-led advertising, except ads in newspapers, have also experienced increases in levels of trust and it’s possible that the CGM revolution has forced advertisers to use a more realistic form of messaging that is grounded in the experience of consumers rather than the lofty ideals of the advertisers.” Brands Gaining Global Trust… In Some Regions More Than Others In the two years the biannual study has been conducted, brand sponsorship has seen the greatest increase in levels of trust from 49 percent of Internet consumers in April 2007 to 64 percent in April 2009. Regionally, Latin American countries lead the way with 81 percent of both Colombian and Venezuelan Internet consumers and 79 percent of Brazilians trusting brand sponsorships. In contrast, sponsorships hold the least sway amongst Swedish (33 percent), Latvian (36 percent) and Finnish online consumers (38 percent). In comparison, 72 percent of United States Internet consumers trust brand sponsorships, placing the United States 12th out of the 50 countries represented in the survey. Brand websites, globally the most trusted form of advertiser-led advertising, hold the greatest sway in China (82 percent). Following China are Pakistan (81 percent) and Vietnam (80 percent). However, brand websites tend to be trusted least amongst Swedish (40 percent) and Israeli (45 percent) Internet consumers. In the US, 62 percent of Internet consumers said they trusted brand sponsorships, placing the United States 21st out of the 50 countries surveyed. “ The regional differences provide a clear guide to advertisers as to how they should focus their ad strategy in different countries. It also shows that, despite the authority of word of mouth when it comes to consumer decision-making, advertisers still have a major say in the process. This is backed up by past Nielsen studies which showed that the majority of people posting comments online went to the advertiser website or emailed feedback to the company before they posted. The website, and monitoring feedback through it, is a golden opportunity for advertisers to shape the tone and content of consumer opinion before it reaches the digital masses,” said Carson.
  • http://blog.nielsen.com/nielsenwire/consumer/global-advertising-consumers-trust-real-friends-and-virtual-strangers-the-most/ Recommendations from personal acquaintances or opinions posted by consumers online are the most trusted forms of advertising, according to the latest Nielsen Global Online Consumer Survey of over 25,000 Internet consumers from 50 countries. Ninety percent or consumers surveyed noted that they trust recommendations from people they know, while 70 percent trusted consumer opinions posted online. “ The explosion in Consumer Generated Media over the last couple of years means consumers’ reliance on word of mouth in the decision-making process, either from people they know or online consumers they don’t, has increased significantly,” says Jonathan Carson, President of Online, International, for the Nielsen Company.” However, in this new age of consumer control, advertisers will be encouraged by the fact that brand websites are trusted at that same 70 percent level as online consumer opinions. Carson adds, “We see that all forms of advertiser-led advertising, except ads in newspapers, have also experienced increases in levels of trust and it’s possible that the CGM revolution has forced advertisers to use a more realistic form of messaging that is grounded in the experience of consumers rather than the lofty ideals of the advertisers.” Brands Gaining Global Trust… In Some Regions More Than Others In the two years the biannual study has been conducted, brand sponsorship has seen the greatest increase in levels of trust from 49 percent of Internet consumers in April 2007 to 64 percent in April 2009. Regionally, Latin American countries lead the way with 81 percent of both Colombian and Venezuelan Internet consumers and 79 percent of Brazilians trusting brand sponsorships. In contrast, sponsorships hold the least sway amongst Swedish (33 percent), Latvian (36 percent) and Finnish online consumers (38 percent). In comparison, 72 percent of United States Internet consumers trust brand sponsorships, placing the United States 12th out of the 50 countries represented in the survey. Brand websites, globally the most trusted form of advertiser-led advertising, hold the greatest sway in China (82 percent). Following China are Pakistan (81 percent) and Vietnam (80 percent). However, brand websites tend to be trusted least amongst Swedish (40 percent) and Israeli (45 percent) Internet consumers. In the US, 62 percent of Internet consumers said they trusted brand sponsorships, placing the United States 21st out of the 50 countries surveyed. “ The regional differences provide a clear guide to advertisers as to how they should focus their ad strategy in different countries. It also shows that, despite the authority of word of mouth when it comes to consumer decision-making, advertisers still have a major say in the process. This is backed up by past Nielsen studies which showed that the majority of people posting comments online went to the advertiser website or emailed feedback to the company before they posted. The website, and monitoring feedback through it, is a golden opportunity for advertisers to shape the tone and content of consumer opinion before it reaches the digital masses,” said Carson.
  • http://blog.nielsen.com/nielsenwire/consumer/global-advertising-consumers-trust-real-friends-and-virtual-strangers-the-most/ Recommendations from personal acquaintances or opinions posted by consumers online are the most trusted forms of advertising, according to the latest Nielsen Global Online Consumer Survey of over 25,000 Internet consumers from 50 countries. Ninety percent or consumers surveyed noted that they trust recommendations from people they know, while 70 percent trusted consumer opinions posted online. “ The explosion in Consumer Generated Media over the last couple of years means consumers’ reliance on word of mouth in the decision-making process, either from people they know or online consumers they don’t, has increased significantly,” says Jonathan Carson, President of Online, International, for the Nielsen Company.” However, in this new age of consumer control, advertisers will be encouraged by the fact that brand websites are trusted at that same 70 percent level as online consumer opinions. Carson adds, “We see that all forms of advertiser-led advertising, except ads in newspapers, have also experienced increases in levels of trust and it’s possible that the CGM revolution has forced advertisers to use a more realistic form of messaging that is grounded in the experience of consumers rather than the lofty ideals of the advertisers.” Brands Gaining Global Trust… In Some Regions More Than Others In the two years the biannual study has been conducted, brand sponsorship has seen the greatest increase in levels of trust from 49 percent of Internet consumers in April 2007 to 64 percent in April 2009. Regionally, Latin American countries lead the way with 81 percent of both Colombian and Venezuelan Internet consumers and 79 percent of Brazilians trusting brand sponsorships. In contrast, sponsorships hold the least sway amongst Swedish (33 percent), Latvian (36 percent) and Finnish online consumers (38 percent). In comparison, 72 percent of United States Internet consumers trust brand sponsorships, placing the United States 12th out of the 50 countries represented in the survey. Brand websites, globally the most trusted form of advertiser-led advertising, hold the greatest sway in China (82 percent). Following China are Pakistan (81 percent) and Vietnam (80 percent). However, brand websites tend to be trusted least amongst Swedish (40 percent) and Israeli (45 percent) Internet consumers. In the US, 62 percent of Internet consumers said they trusted brand sponsorships, placing the United States 21st out of the 50 countries surveyed. “ The regional differences provide a clear guide to advertisers as to how they should focus their ad strategy in different countries. It also shows that, despite the authority of word of mouth when it comes to consumer decision-making, advertisers still have a major say in the process. This is backed up by past Nielsen studies which showed that the majority of people posting comments online went to the advertiser website or emailed feedback to the company before they posted. The website, and monitoring feedback through it, is a golden opportunity for advertisers to shape the tone and content of consumer opinion before it reaches the digital masses,” said Carson.
  • At CRUK we are incredibly fortunate to be supported by a generous and very diverse range of supporters, with some 2million+ giving us some form of financial support over the last couple of years - from traditional cash appeals, direct debits, legacy donations, etc. to 750k women taking part in our Race for Life 5k sponsored event and all manner of other activities.
  • http://blog.nielsen.com/nielsenwire/consumer/global-advertising-consumers-trust-real-friends-and-virtual-strangers-the-most/ Recommendations from personal acquaintances or opinions posted by consumers online are the most trusted forms of advertising, according to the latest Nielsen Global Online Consumer Survey of over 25,000 Internet consumers from 50 countries. Ninety percent or consumers surveyed noted that they trust recommendations from people they know, while 70 percent trusted consumer opinions posted online. “ The explosion in Consumer Generated Media over the last couple of years means consumers’ reliance on word of mouth in the decision-making process, either from people they know or online consumers they don’t, has increased significantly,” says Jonathan Carson, President of Online, International, for the Nielsen Company.” However, in this new age of consumer control, advertisers will be encouraged by the fact that brand websites are trusted at that same 70 percent level as online consumer opinions. Carson adds, “We see that all forms of advertiser-led advertising, except ads in newspapers, have also experienced increases in levels of trust and it’s possible that the CGM revolution has forced advertisers to use a more realistic form of messaging that is grounded in the experience of consumers rather than the lofty ideals of the advertisers.” Brands Gaining Global Trust… In Some Regions More Than Others In the two years the biannual study has been conducted, brand sponsorship has seen the greatest increase in levels of trust from 49 percent of Internet consumers in April 2007 to 64 percent in April 2009. Regionally, Latin American countries lead the way with 81 percent of both Colombian and Venezuelan Internet consumers and 79 percent of Brazilians trusting brand sponsorships. In contrast, sponsorships hold the least sway amongst Swedish (33 percent), Latvian (36 percent) and Finnish online consumers (38 percent). In comparison, 72 percent of United States Internet consumers trust brand sponsorships, placing the United States 12th out of the 50 countries represented in the survey. Brand websites, globally the most trusted form of advertiser-led advertising, hold the greatest sway in China (82 percent). Following China are Pakistan (81 percent) and Vietnam (80 percent). However, brand websites tend to be trusted least amongst Swedish (40 percent) and Israeli (45 percent) Internet consumers. In the US, 62 percent of Internet consumers said they trusted brand sponsorships, placing the United States 21st out of the 50 countries surveyed. “ The regional differences provide a clear guide to advertisers as to how they should focus their ad strategy in different countries. It also shows that, despite the authority of word of mouth when it comes to consumer decision-making, advertisers still have a major say in the process. This is backed up by past Nielsen studies which showed that the majority of people posting comments online went to the advertiser website or emailed feedback to the company before they posted. The website, and monitoring feedback through it, is a golden opportunity for advertisers to shape the tone and content of consumer opinion before it reaches the digital masses,” said Carson.
  • http://blog.nielsen.com/nielsenwire/consumer/global-advertising-consumers-trust-real-friends-and-virtual-strangers-the-most/ Recommendations from personal acquaintances or opinions posted by consumers online are the most trusted forms of advertising, according to the latest Nielsen Global Online Consumer Survey of over 25,000 Internet consumers from 50 countries. Ninety percent or consumers surveyed noted that they trust recommendations from people they know, while 70 percent trusted consumer opinions posted online. “ The explosion in Consumer Generated Media over the last couple of years means consumers’ reliance on word of mouth in the decision-making process, either from people they know or online consumers they don’t, has increased significantly,” says Jonathan Carson, President of Online, International, for the Nielsen Company.” However, in this new age of consumer control, advertisers will be encouraged by the fact that brand websites are trusted at that same 70 percent level as online consumer opinions. Carson adds, “We see that all forms of advertiser-led advertising, except ads in newspapers, have also experienced increases in levels of trust and it’s possible that the CGM revolution has forced advertisers to use a more realistic form of messaging that is grounded in the experience of consumers rather than the lofty ideals of the advertisers.” Brands Gaining Global Trust… In Some Regions More Than Others In the two years the biannual study has been conducted, brand sponsorship has seen the greatest increase in levels of trust from 49 percent of Internet consumers in April 2007 to 64 percent in April 2009. Regionally, Latin American countries lead the way with 81 percent of both Colombian and Venezuelan Internet consumers and 79 percent of Brazilians trusting brand sponsorships. In contrast, sponsorships hold the least sway amongst Swedish (33 percent), Latvian (36 percent) and Finnish online consumers (38 percent). In comparison, 72 percent of United States Internet consumers trust brand sponsorships, placing the United States 12th out of the 50 countries represented in the survey. Brand websites, globally the most trusted form of advertiser-led advertising, hold the greatest sway in China (82 percent). Following China are Pakistan (81 percent) and Vietnam (80 percent). However, brand websites tend to be trusted least amongst Swedish (40 percent) and Israeli (45 percent) Internet consumers. In the US, 62 percent of Internet consumers said they trusted brand sponsorships, placing the United States 21st out of the 50 countries surveyed. “ The regional differences provide a clear guide to advertisers as to how they should focus their ad strategy in different countries. It also shows that, despite the authority of word of mouth when it comes to consumer decision-making, advertisers still have a major say in the process. This is backed up by past Nielsen studies which showed that the majority of people posting comments online went to the advertiser website or emailed feedback to the company before they posted. The website, and monitoring feedback through it, is a golden opportunity for advertisers to shape the tone and content of consumer opinion before it reaches the digital masses,” said Carson.
  • http://blog.nielsen.com/nielsenwire/consumer/global-advertising-consumers-trust-real-friends-and-virtual-strangers-the-most/ Recommendations from personal acquaintances or opinions posted by consumers online are the most trusted forms of advertising, according to the latest Nielsen Global Online Consumer Survey of over 25,000 Internet consumers from 50 countries. Ninety percent or consumers surveyed noted that they trust recommendations from people they know, while 70 percent trusted consumer opinions posted online. “ The explosion in Consumer Generated Media over the last couple of years means consumers’ reliance on word of mouth in the decision-making process, either from people they know or online consumers they don’t, has increased significantly,” says Jonathan Carson, President of Online, International, for the Nielsen Company.” However, in this new age of consumer control, advertisers will be encouraged by the fact that brand websites are trusted at that same 70 percent level as online consumer opinions. Carson adds, “We see that all forms of advertiser-led advertising, except ads in newspapers, have also experienced increases in levels of trust and it’s possible that the CGM revolution has forced advertisers to use a more realistic form of messaging that is grounded in the experience of consumers rather than the lofty ideals of the advertisers.” Brands Gaining Global Trust… In Some Regions More Than Others In the two years the biannual study has been conducted, brand sponsorship has seen the greatest increase in levels of trust from 49 percent of Internet consumers in April 2007 to 64 percent in April 2009. Regionally, Latin American countries lead the way with 81 percent of both Colombian and Venezuelan Internet consumers and 79 percent of Brazilians trusting brand sponsorships. In contrast, sponsorships hold the least sway amongst Swedish (33 percent), Latvian (36 percent) and Finnish online consumers (38 percent). In comparison, 72 percent of United States Internet consumers trust brand sponsorships, placing the United States 12th out of the 50 countries represented in the survey. Brand websites, globally the most trusted form of advertiser-led advertising, hold the greatest sway in China (82 percent). Following China are Pakistan (81 percent) and Vietnam (80 percent). However, brand websites tend to be trusted least amongst Swedish (40 percent) and Israeli (45 percent) Internet consumers. In the US, 62 percent of Internet consumers said they trusted brand sponsorships, placing the United States 21st out of the 50 countries surveyed. “ The regional differences provide a clear guide to advertisers as to how they should focus their ad strategy in different countries. It also shows that, despite the authority of word of mouth when it comes to consumer decision-making, advertisers still have a major say in the process. This is backed up by past Nielsen studies which showed that the majority of people posting comments online went to the advertiser website or emailed feedback to the company before they posted. The website, and monitoring feedback through it, is a golden opportunity for advertisers to shape the tone and content of consumer opinion before it reaches the digital masses,” said Carson.
  • http://blog.nielsen.com/nielsenwire/consumer/global-advertising-consumers-trust-real-friends-and-virtual-strangers-the-most/ Recommendations from personal acquaintances or opinions posted by consumers online are the most trusted forms of advertising, according to the latest Nielsen Global Online Consumer Survey of over 25,000 Internet consumers from 50 countries. Ninety percent or consumers surveyed noted that they trust recommendations from people they know, while 70 percent trusted consumer opinions posted online. “ The explosion in Consumer Generated Media over the last couple of years means consumers’ reliance on word of mouth in the decision-making process, either from people they know or online consumers they don’t, has increased significantly,” says Jonathan Carson, President of Online, International, for the Nielsen Company.” However, in this new age of consumer control, advertisers will be encouraged by the fact that brand websites are trusted at that same 70 percent level as online consumer opinions. Carson adds, “We see that all forms of advertiser-led advertising, except ads in newspapers, have also experienced increases in levels of trust and it’s possible that the CGM revolution has forced advertisers to use a more realistic form of messaging that is grounded in the experience of consumers rather than the lofty ideals of the advertisers.” Brands Gaining Global Trust… In Some Regions More Than Others In the two years the biannual study has been conducted, brand sponsorship has seen the greatest increase in levels of trust from 49 percent of Internet consumers in April 2007 to 64 percent in April 2009. Regionally, Latin American countries lead the way with 81 percent of both Colombian and Venezuelan Internet consumers and 79 percent of Brazilians trusting brand sponsorships. In contrast, sponsorships hold the least sway amongst Swedish (33 percent), Latvian (36 percent) and Finnish online consumers (38 percent). In comparison, 72 percent of United States Internet consumers trust brand sponsorships, placing the United States 12th out of the 50 countries represented in the survey. Brand websites, globally the most trusted form of advertiser-led advertising, hold the greatest sway in China (82 percent). Following China are Pakistan (81 percent) and Vietnam (80 percent). However, brand websites tend to be trusted least amongst Swedish (40 percent) and Israeli (45 percent) Internet consumers. In the US, 62 percent of Internet consumers said they trusted brand sponsorships, placing the United States 21st out of the 50 countries surveyed. “ The regional differences provide a clear guide to advertisers as to how they should focus their ad strategy in different countries. It also shows that, despite the authority of word of mouth when it comes to consumer decision-making, advertisers still have a major say in the process. This is backed up by past Nielsen studies which showed that the majority of people posting comments online went to the advertiser website or emailed feedback to the company before they posted. The website, and monitoring feedback through it, is a golden opportunity for advertisers to shape the tone and content of consumer opinion before it reaches the digital masses,” said Carson.
  • http://blog.nielsen.com/nielsenwire/consumer/global-advertising-consumers-trust-real-friends-and-virtual-strangers-the-most/ Recommendations from personal acquaintances or opinions posted by consumers online are the most trusted forms of advertising, according to the latest Nielsen Global Online Consumer Survey of over 25,000 Internet consumers from 50 countries. Ninety percent or consumers surveyed noted that they trust recommendations from people they know, while 70 percent trusted consumer opinions posted online. “ The explosion in Consumer Generated Media over the last couple of years means consumers’ reliance on word of mouth in the decision-making process, either from people they know or online consumers they don’t, has increased significantly,” says Jonathan Carson, President of Online, International, for the Nielsen Company.” However, in this new age of consumer control, advertisers will be encouraged by the fact that brand websites are trusted at that same 70 percent level as online consumer opinions. Carson adds, “We see that all forms of advertiser-led advertising, except ads in newspapers, have also experienced increases in levels of trust and it’s possible that the CGM revolution has forced advertisers to use a more realistic form of messaging that is grounded in the experience of consumers rather than the lofty ideals of the advertisers.” Brands Gaining Global Trust… In Some Regions More Than Others In the two years the biannual study has been conducted, brand sponsorship has seen the greatest increase in levels of trust from 49 percent of Internet consumers in April 2007 to 64 percent in April 2009. Regionally, Latin American countries lead the way with 81 percent of both Colombian and Venezuelan Internet consumers and 79 percent of Brazilians trusting brand sponsorships. In contrast, sponsorships hold the least sway amongst Swedish (33 percent), Latvian (36 percent) and Finnish online consumers (38 percent). In comparison, 72 percent of United States Internet consumers trust brand sponsorships, placing the United States 12th out of the 50 countries represented in the survey. Brand websites, globally the most trusted form of advertiser-led advertising, hold the greatest sway in China (82 percent). Following China are Pakistan (81 percent) and Vietnam (80 percent). However, brand websites tend to be trusted least amongst Swedish (40 percent) and Israeli (45 percent) Internet consumers. In the US, 62 percent of Internet consumers said they trusted brand sponsorships, placing the United States 21st out of the 50 countries surveyed. “ The regional differences provide a clear guide to advertisers as to how they should focus their ad strategy in different countries. It also shows that, despite the authority of word of mouth when it comes to consumer decision-making, advertisers still have a major say in the process. This is backed up by past Nielsen studies which showed that the majority of people posting comments online went to the advertiser website or emailed feedback to the company before they posted. The website, and monitoring feedback through it, is a golden opportunity for advertisers to shape the tone and content of consumer opinion before it reaches the digital masses,” said Carson.
  • At CRUK we are incredibly fortunate to be supported by a generous and very diverse range of supporters, with some 2million+ giving us some form of financial support over the last couple of years - from traditional cash appeals, direct debits, legacy donations, etc. to 750k women taking part in our Race for Life 5k sponsored event and all manner of other activities. Who we are What we did Why we did it We’re fascinated about data, and the small things that make a big difference. Be that user experience to research. Are there certain profiles who respond better and more positively who respond to different methods? We wanted to find that out. We surveyed a sample of 2,702 of people who gave online, across all different types of charities It’s the biggest online collection of people and causes in the world, we have 10 million users, 1 in 5 of UK internet users, so it’s a unique snapshot of online giving habits. Bryan and I thought – great opportunity to generate some insight into the state of online giving, and who the people are who give This is the start – online donors, and we want to find out more about online fundraisers
  • We asked donors – is this your first online donation? Like the CR-UK data, the middle age ranges are comfortable and have done this before. BUT – 55-64 range is the second most comfortable There are a lot of people comfortable in giving and transacting online – are you meeting their needs? If you don’t ask them to give online – I’m sure you’ve read about *silver surfers* but are you doing anything about it? Benchmark your own online donors against this. Why are your own groups not as well represented? Would’ve said 25-34 was the biggest repeat donors – but it’s not – by a long way. Hide graph, then show.
  • What do people in the room think? What’s the traditional model...? Add in blank slide! Not getting into a debate over the battle of the sexes (who earns more), but in terms of profiling and segmentation, have you considered segmenting your ask by gender online?
  • Basic demographic data for the survey. &gt;64 is the only range with more males – why do you think?
  • Just say this – key donation stat – avg is £30
  • What is your donor care strategy – do you differentiate based on age? As people get older, they give more What is the language you use and the channels – offline/online. I don’t think we have the same donor care for online donors as we do for offline – yet Will a clever charity segment a donor care strategy by age. Don’t they have different needs to the younger people? Has anyone done it?
  • While donors over 45 are under-represented in terms of numbers, they are over-represented in terms of value of donation. Put that another way, there are less of them, but each of them is giving more. 45-80 is a big span, tend to give more. But it’s the over 60s who are giving the highest??? 35-54 is worth 45% 25-54 = 62% revenue So what – how does your website work with older people? Are they targeted? Do you advertise on the sites they use? Is your own site older-people friendly. Is your marcomms strategy integrating online and offline.
  • Question – how to make this look ok!?! Older people are significantly more likely to donate more. Men have more of a peak in the &gt;50.
  • Question – how to make this look ok!?! Older people are significantly more likely to donate more. Men have more of a peak in the &gt;50.
  • So what – how does your website work with older people? Are they targeted? Do you advertise on the sites they use? Is your own site older-people friendly. Is your marcomms strategy integrating online and offline.
  • Overwhelming majority of people still respond to emails for online donations. To give you some context – here’s JG’s figures. Most comes from email – looking at the last four weeks, 16% comes from FB. 40% of referrals are direct – email. So you need to think of your audience and the tools they use. There’s been a shift from email to FB, but email still rules as a communication method. 2 years ago, FB was significantly less. Anyone replacing email with FB?
  • Get the most recent charts
  • Last month suggests the opposite - symbiotic relationship between social media and email. September this year – less than one month ago. Think about it – how do you know you’ve got a FB message, or new comment – or a new follower on twitter – it’s by email!
  • When you drill into the ages, the clearer patterns emerge. None of them are that much of a surprise – but do you plan your comms or segment by this data. If you’re not using FB – are you missing out on a huge opportunity. We’re fascinated by FB, so I wanted to show you some facts that would be of interest. List the top sources to the JG site – Direct 40% (email), FB 16%, Google 15%
  • Sources from Facebook to JG. Percentage of referrals from FB home page – 60%. Not interrupting you – it’s in your news feed – what you are interested in Profile is 12% Group is 4% Search is 3% Inbox just 2% If you’re not set up for this, you need to be – it isn’t going away. If you want to engage people online, and you’re not on FB, you’re missing a trick. If you are, and you’re not sending messages, posting to your wall, then you may as well not be on there. 1. /home.php 303,103 59.88% 2. /profile.php 62,070 12.26% 3. /group.php 21,949 4.34% 4. /search/ 19,085 3.77% 5. /inbox/ 12,143 2.40% 6. /photo.php 9,080 1.79% 7. /posted.php 8,015 1.58% 8. /event.php 6,374 1.26% /album.php 5,191 1.03% /inbox/readmessage.php 4,852 0.96%
  • Who’s using FB connect – who knows what it is?
  • Find a charity example too. Not just fundraising – campaigning, can be action, participation, engagement.
  • Who’s using FB connect – who knows what it is?
  • Average time on page…
  • http://blog.nielsen.com/nielsenwire/online_mobile/is-social-media-impacting-how-much-we-email John Smith aged 60 gets the same message, the same ask, the same channel as John Smith aged 30
  • Introduce the case study and how it links – Colin as an example of a new breed of fundraiser, using socmed tolls and networked fundraising/supporter recruitment theory in practice to reach new supporters. Imagine spending 365 days – a full year – undertaking as many challenges as you can to test yourself to the limit. Maybe not everyone&apos;s idea of fun ... but then imagine that across that year, you use those challenges to raise as much money as you can for a very, very good cause. Does that sound better? Add to the mix that you do it in memory of a loved family member, and there aren&apos;t many better reasons, are there?
  • When I launched the 365challenge in August 2008, while I was aware of Facebook, I had rarely used it, and I hadn’t really heard of Twitter. I wanted to use email and the internet as much as possible as I saw this as the way to spread my message. I think somewhere along the way I read, on either/both the CRUK and the JG sites, some tips on using Facebook, so I started to explore this Not having a large group of friends on FB, I saw that I needed to make connections, so started joining groups and sharing thoughts with others who had references things like cancer and CRUK in their writings, and I was able to spread the message slowly this way.
  • When I launched the 365challenge in August 2008, while I was aware of Facebook, I had rarely used it, and I hadn’t really heard of Twitter. I wanted to use email and the internet as much as possible as I saw this as the way to spread my message. I think somewhere along the way I read, on either/both the CRUK and the JG sites, some tips on using Facebook, so I started to explore this Not having a large group of friends on FB, I saw that I needed to make connections, so started joining groups and sharing thoughts with others who had references things like cancer and CRUK in their writings, and I was able to spread the message slowly this way.
  • I’ll not claim that this lead to huge donations or a load of people taking the 365challenge (yet), but it allowed me to spread the word and invite people to engage with me online and to pass on the links to their groups of friends on FB too. Ripples spreading outwards, occasionally touching someone whom I’d never have encountered, but who could now share my message or even come on board and want to join me in raising funds for CRUK by taking their own 365challenges … a number of my 365ers fit this profile. And as they have come on board, they’ve created their own FB groups, and so the ripples continue to spread … Twitter was a different matter. Once I did start playing with it, however, firstly following a few celebrities, then searching for key words like cancer or CRUK, I began to see just what a powerful tool this was … http://www.flickr.com/photos/twenty_questions/2808819998
  • Colin is one in a million – give even the people who wouldn’t think about these things the tools, advice and support they need. Finally, what would have helped me (or maybe got me further along this process sooner than my own efforts did) … maybe more guidance on how FB can be exploited, an explanation of what Twitter is all about and how to use this to connect with like-minded people, guidance on how following someone can give you access to their followers too (okay, they need to follow you back now, but that’ll happen), tips on keeping your message out there – how regular blog updates can be tweeted about so others get to know that you’ve written something new, changing your FB status regularly and using these status updates and tweets to draw people in, teasing them into reading more …
  • Colin is having a brilliant time. This is user delight – people find running a marathon easy compared to raising money. This is a *good* experience – the kind of thing all websites dream of offering, and you can put people like Colin at the heart of your online strategy and focus on providing the best experiences. I began to follow more people, and as a number of them followed me back, here again I was making connections with like-minded folk, who could spread the word for me on the 365challenge. Looking at who people I was following were following opened more doorways and more connections were made. Twitter was a different matter. Once I did start playing with it, however, firstly following a few celebrities, then searching for key words like cancer or CRUK, I began to see just what a powerful tool this was … Twitter connected me with people who have sponsored me, who have taken the 365challenge on themselves and/or who have promoted the 365challenge on my behalf. These are people who I would NEVER have encountered otherwise, and the connections made will be invaluable both to me and the 365challenge and to CRUK, as this concept is going to grow, partly helped by these enthusiastic strangers, many of whom I now count as supporters and friends, some of whom have gone out of their way to join me in some of my adventures.
  • Understanding the new breed of digital donors and how to maximise your fundraising through their networks

    1. 1. Understanding the new breed of digital donors and how to maximise your fundraising through their networks Bryan Miller Head of Strategy & Consumer Insight Cancer Research UK [email_address] @millbry Jonathan Waddingham Charity Champion JustGiving [email_address] @jon_bedford
    2. 2. <ul><li>Bryan Miller </li></ul><ul><li>(Former) Head of Strategy & Consumer Insight at Cancer Research UK </li></ul><ul><li>First Computer: Research Machines 380Z </li></ul><ul><li>Favourite website </li></ul><ul><li>Spezify.com </li></ul><ul><li>Jonathan Waddingham </li></ul><ul><li>Charity Champion at JustGiving </li></ul><ul><li>First Computer: ZX Spectrum </li></ul><ul><li>Favourite website: </li></ul><ul><li>failblog.org </li></ul>
    3. 3. Understanding the new breed of digital donors and how to maximise your fundraising through their networks
    4. 4. Don’t worry We’re all in much the same boat! How best to capitalise on the opportunities offered by social media as part of an effective fundraising strategy is something we’re still working through
    5. 5. Let’s begin… with a (true) story
    6. 6. It all began… Jenni Ware Carolee Hazzard … with a lost purse
    7. 7. Realtime community storytelling
    8. 8. $93 is now $22,000! And looks set to continue growing - thanks to the multiplier effect of social network fundraising
    9. 9. Trader Joe’s also donated over 350lbs of groceries - nice!
    10. 10. <ul><li>Donations continue being made at the Second Harvest site </li></ul><ul><li>but it really doesn’t have anything like the community vibe </li></ul><ul><li>of the 93 Dollar Club Facebook Page </li></ul>
    11. 12. http://flickr.com/photos/kaptainkobold/195999767
    12. 13. The moral of this story? Donors are doing it for themselves!
    13. 14. Donors are doing it for themselves! <ul><li>Second Harvest didn’t approach Carolee to ask her to support them - her Facebook friends suggested them </li></ul><ul><li>Carolee didn’t need to approach Second Harvest to ask them how to fundraise or to ask for promotional materials or advice </li></ul><ul><li>The first Second Harvest knew about it was when the money and food started rolling-in! </li></ul><ul><li>Carolee and her friends probably don’t know it - but they represent a fast emerging ‘new breed’ of digital donors </li></ul>
    14. 15. So… what is our role in all this?
    15. 16. Our traditional role
    16. 17. Within the 4-Cs of social network fundraising Our new role… Community Commodity Cause Impact Content
    17. 18. The first ‘C’ = Community Community <ul><li>The ‘new breed’ of digital donors - like Carolee Hazzard - have their own online communities who they choose to spend time with </li></ul><ul><li>Time spent on Facebook by US consumers was up 700% year on year to April 2009* </li></ul><ul><li>Despite technological advances we still only have 24 hours in each day - so more time spent online in one place means less time to come and visit our charity websites (or do other stuff) </li></ul><ul><li>We need to get used to people actively fundraising for us through their own community networks - but not necessarily wanting to join our community </li></ul>*Source Nielsen: http://bit.ly/1AJ7ni
    18. 19. One social network to rule them all? http://www.buzzpoint.com/
    19. 20. <ul><li>The online world got excited when Facebook hit 250m users in July 2009 </li></ul><ul><li>By September 2009 it was up to 300m </li></ul><ul><li>Various analysts suggests its growth is now slowing considerably - but it’s still around the same ‘population’ as the US! </li></ul>http://img41.yfrog.com/i/facebookwqi.jpg/
    20. 21. <ul><li>All of which means that earlier this month it passed Yahoo! to take second place in the global ranking of sites by Alexa </li></ul><ul><li>(Twitter is currently 13 th ! :-) </li></ul>http://www.alexa.com/topsites
    21. 22. <ul><li>However, on a country-by-country basis things can look very different </li></ul><ul><li>Facebook is only 10th in Holland - where Hyves is where it’s at for social networking </li></ul><ul><li>(Twitter is only 16th;-[) </li></ul>http://www.alexa.com/topsites
    22. 23. <ul><li>You can check the profile of Facebook users in your own country at checkfacebook.com </li></ul>http://www.checkfacebook.com/
    23. 24. One social network to rule them all? http://www.techcrunch.com/2008/06/23/modeling-the-real-market-value-of-social-networks/ Netherlands Hyves, MySpace, Hi5, Facebook Italy MySpace, Badoo, Hi5, Facebook Germany MySpace, Piczo, Facebook, Hi5 France Skyroc, MySpace Facebook Brazil Orkut, Sonico, Multiply, MySpace, Australia Facebook, MySpace, Bebo India Orkut, Facebook, Hi5, MySpace Not quite yet…
    24. 25. The second ‘C’ = Commodity Commodity <ul><li>The rise of free Social Network sites like Facebook, YouTube, etc - plus easy to use online giving sites - means that online fundraising platforms are increasingly a freely available commodity </li></ul><ul><li>The ‘new breed’ of online donors simply choose the sites and tools that work for them - and then get on with their fundraising </li></ul><ul><li>This leaves charities with a feeling of losing control , but there’s no getting around it - it’s just how the new breed want to do it! </li></ul>
    25. 26. The second ‘C’ = Commodity Commodity Vs
    26. 27. The third ‘C’ = Content <ul><li>Great fundraisers are great storytellers - bringing the cause and the opportunity to make a difference to life, through all sorts of media </li></ul><ul><li>This is still a very important role for us going forward - providing ‘portable content’ that supporters can use on their own sites </li></ul><ul><li>But the ‘new breed’ are also telling their own stories - about our work and the efforts they are making to support it </li></ul><ul><li>They may not always say what we expect - or even want - them to say. But, it is them that their community is more likely to listen to - not us! </li></ul><ul><li>Again , we may feel we are losing control - but we need to learn how to handle this concern </li></ul>Content
    27. 28. The third ‘C’ = Content <ul><li>There are times when we can help these supporters tell better stories - particularly when it comes to explaining specialist aspects of our work </li></ul><ul><li>Cancer Research UK creates ‘portable content’ that fundraisers can embed in their profiles, blogs, etc. to help explain the work they’re helping fund </li></ul><ul><li>This also helps provide a degree of brand and messaging control out in the Web 2.0 ‘cloud’ </li></ul>http://myprojects.cancerresearchuk.org/projects/pancreatic-cancer Content
    28. 29. The fourth ‘C’ = Cause Impact <ul><li>This is why we do what we do - to make a real difference in the world around us </li></ul><ul><li>The relationship between our organisations and our donors is a partnership - we can’t do it without them, they can’t do it without us </li></ul><ul><li>While they can get-on doing their own fundraising - they rely on us to use the money their hard work and passion raises to best effect </li></ul><ul><li>So, look for ways to better serve them through the way we communicate the cause impact our partnership has </li></ul><ul><ul><li>improving the way we ‘package’ opportunities to make an impact </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>better measurement and reporting-back on the impact of their efforts </li></ul></ul>Cause Impact
    29. 30. Getting to know the new breed
    30. 31. Getting to know the new breed <ul><li>Insight from Cancer Research UK supporter research undertaken early 2009 as part of supporter segmentation project </li></ul><ul><li>Survey distributed by mail and email to large sample of supporters, chosen to be representative of all key supporter types </li></ul><ul><li>Total response comprised over 30,000 completed surveys </li></ul><ul><li>Survey included questions on both ‘tradigital’ and social media use </li></ul>
    31. 32. Getting to know the new breed Online activities
    32. 33. <ul><li>Email usage only really starts to tail-off at 65+ - and almost one third of 75+ use it </li></ul>
    33. 34. <ul><li>Online shopping peaks across the 18 to 54 age bands </li></ul><ul><li>Less than 1 in 5 75+ supporters shop online </li></ul>
    34. 35. <ul><li>Online banking peaks in the 25-34 age group - with fairly rapid decline beyond that </li></ul>
    35. 36. <ul><li>Overall 40% of our supporters have donated to a charity online </li></ul><ul><li>Again, 25-34 sees the peak - at approaching 60% </li></ul>
    36. 37. <ul><li>Data for ‘Sponsored a Friend Online’ similar to overall online donation </li></ul><ul><li>However the youngest age groups seem significantly less likely to sponsor a friend than just donate online - as does the oldest age group </li></ul>
    37. 38. <ul><li>Online event sign-up relatively equal across <18 through 44 </li></ul><ul><li>Understandably lowest in the 75+ age band </li></ul>
    38. 39. <ul><li>Supporters using social networks reflect the overall UK norm - over 50% under 35 then decline </li></ul><ul><li>But largest growth now being seen in 35 to 54 groups </li></ul>
    39. 40. <ul><li>Overall just 5% of our supporters said they had used social networks to interact with a charity - compared to over 25% overall who have joined a social network </li></ul>
    40. 41. Getting to know the new breed Advocacy
    41. 42. <ul><li>Overall around one third of our supporters say they actively encourage others to support - which is brilliant! </li></ul>
    42. 43. <ul><li>Quite a lot more are happy to talk about their own support for us, but don’t actively encourage others to do the same </li></ul>
    43. 44. <ul><li>And a significant number would consider talking about their support for us </li></ul><ul><li>Interestingly, consideration tails-off in the older age groups </li></ul>
    44. 45. <ul><li>A trend confirmed here - with older donors more likely to display a belief that their giving is private </li></ul>
    45. 46. <ul><li>An even stronger age-related trend to the belief that giving is a private thing shown here </li></ul>
    46. 47. Getting to know the new breed <ul><li>Details of Just Giving research </li></ul><ul><ul><li>People were prompted to take survey after making a donation online </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Donation could have been made to any size charity in any category </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Survey carried out from early August to end September 2009 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2820 people took the survey </li></ul></ul>
    47. 48. Is this your first online donation?
    48. 49. Which gender is giving more?
    49. 50. What’s the spread of ages by gender?
    50. 51. How much do people donate online?
    51. 52. Donation share vs revenue share
    52. 53. Key stats 25% Percentage (in revenue) that comes from donors over 45 who donate more than £50 Percentage (in revenue) that comes from donors over 55 33% Percentage (in revenue) that comes from donors over 65 11%
    53. 54. Donation spread by age and gender
    54. 55. Donation spread by age and gender
    55. 56. How do you help these people? accessible targeted advertise user-friendly integrate online/offline email
    56. 57. What was the source of the donation ask?
    57. 58. Let’s look at the trends...
    58. 59. Is email use increasing or decreasing? http://icanhaz.com/emailstats
    59. 60. Do the tools used vary depending on age?
    60. 61. Facebook – where the new breed lives <ul><ul><li>60% </li></ul></ul>Percentage of Facebook visits from Facebook home page <ul><ul><li>2% </li></ul></ul>Percentage of Facebook visits from Facebook inbox
    61. 62. Who is using Facebook Connect?
    62. 63. Facebook Connect
    63. 64. Who is using Facebook Connect?
    64. 65. Community fundraising through Twitter http://twitter.com/serafinowicz/status/1321093848
    65. 66. Community fundraising through Twitter 14% of referrals on 13 th March to JustGiving were from Twitter www.justgiving.com/peterserafinowicz
    66. 67. Fundraising through Twitter – micro donations 1,106 donations £4.86 average Current total: £5,396.07
    67. 68. So what does this all mean? Different segments require different channels, as well as different messages Ignore your older online donors at your peril Newsfeeds are the single most valuable real estate on Facebook for charities Test online donation prompts by age and gender (as well as RFV) Email is still the king of comms for many people online The new breed of social media fundraisers is growing in importance
    68. 69. The moral of this story? Donors are doing it for themselves!
    69. 70. The 365 Challenge www.365challenge.co.uk & @365er
    70. 71. This is Colin’s story “ In 2007, I was diagnosed with a soft tissue sarcoma and underwent surgery, followed by radiotherapy. Then in 2008, my sister, Brenda Carr, died after a long battle with breast cancer. Following on from this, I knew that I wanted to raise money to support Cancer Research UK, because I felt that they were supporting important work in the fight to overcome cancer.”
    71. 72. Colin’s strategy
    72. 73. Colin’s strategy “ With a group, I found that I could engage with a target audience who had expressed an interest in what I was doing – what any advertiser dreams of, really!”
    73. 74. The ripple effect…
    74. 75. What would’ve helped Colin guidance on how following someone can give you access to their followers too changing your Facebook status regularly and using these status updates and tweets to draw people in, teasing them into reading more … an explanation of what Twitter is all about tips on keeping your message out there – how regular blog updates can be tweeted about so others get to know that you’ve written something new, more guidance on how FB can be exploited
    75. 76. The new breed “ As I posted Tweets about hitting milestones or new blogs, these connections were Re-Tweeting them, and my message spread further and further.” “ These enthusiastic strangers... I now count as supporters and friends”
    76. 77. <ul><li>Contact us </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Bryan Miller </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>@millbry </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>http://givinginadigitalworld.org </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>slideshare.net/bryanmiller </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Jonathan Waddingham </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>@jon_bedford </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>http://charities.justgiving.com </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>slideshare.net/jwaddingham </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>http://icanhaz.com/PFJW </li></ul></ul>

    ×