What Educators Can Learn From the Video Game Industry

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Pre-conference workshop given at Educause 2012 annual event.

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What Educators Can Learn From the Video Game Industry

  1. 1. November 6, 2012
  2. 2. What Educators can Learn fromthe Video Game IndustryBryan FendleyDirector of Academic ComputingUniversity of Arkansas at Monticello November 6, 2012
  3. 3. A short bio
  4. 4. Today’s mission
  5. 5. 1. Developing game literacy2. Identifying instructional design principles found in video games3. Implementing game mechanics within learning environments4. Introducing technologies for implementing game mechanics 5
  6. 6. Rules of play for this workshop
  7. 7. • Two ten minute breaks after 50 minutes of play.• Feel free to use the chat, or ask questions through phone line.• Couple of mini games within the workshop.• Chance for discussion and reflection at the end. 7
  8. 8. Identify the gamified element Game Element 8
  9. 9. Game Element Where does this story begin?
  10. 10. Game Element My quest was started.
  11. 11. Game Element Then, I leveled up.
  12. 12. Sharing what I have learned during my quest.
  13. 13. • Defining games• Gamification• Games and learning• Gaming the classroom• Gamified syllabus• Technology supporting educational gaming• The future of gaming• Where my quest will be taking me next 13
  14. 14. Game Element Ice - breaker
  15. 15. What’s your player type? 15
  16. 16. Bartle’s player types – Achievers – Explorers – Socializers – Killers 16
  17. 17. Generation “G”“Games are the norm for people born after 1971”. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bing_Gordon
  18. 18. Game Element Poll • What percent of youth play games? • What percent of gamers are women? • How old is the average game player?
  19. 19. Game Stats• 97% youth play games• 40% gamers are women• Average game player is 35 years old and has been playing for 12 years Entertainment Software Association’s annual study of game players http://www.theesa.com/facts/gameplayer.asp
  20. 20. What are games really about?• Problem solving• Engagement• More and more also involve a social component
  21. 21. Defining traits of a game• Goal• Rules• Feedback system• Voluntary participation Jane McGonigal, Reality Is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World
  22. 22. Goals• In instructional design we call this “objectives”. 22
  23. 23. Rules• All classes have rules – syllabus. 23
  24. 24. Feedback system• We have many feedback systems.• In video games feedback is instant. 24
  25. 25. Voluntary participation• Technically students are in classes voluntarily, but the reality is they might rather be somewhere else. 25
  26. 26. Let’s not forget “Fun”• Games are fun, although the word fun is subjective. 26
  27. 27. Types of games• Text based games• Alternate Reality Games (ARG)• Mobile games• Virtual worlds• Single player• Massively Multiplayer Online (MMO)• Epistemic• Serious 27
  28. 28. What is gamification?• The application of game mechanics; term is mostly used in marketing, but also applicable to education.
  29. 29. 4 Hallmarks of Gamification• Badges• On boarding• Challenges and quests• Social engagement Game Mechanics defined by Gabe Zichermann in his book “Gamification by Design”
  30. 30. Digital Badges for Learning“Badges can help speed the shift from credentials that simply measure seat time, to ones that more accurately measure competency.” Secretary Duncan, U.S. Department of Education http://www.ed.gov/news/speeches/digital-badges-learning
  31. 31. On boarding
  32. 32. Challenges and quests
  33. 33. Social engagement
  34. 34. What do the video game industry and education have in common?• Demographics• Repeat Customers• Teaching of Complex Skills• Probably more…
  35. 35. How do video games teach?tutorialsvideospeer/network learningtrial and errorpuzzlesgames inside of gamesbuild cultureplayers guidescollect stuff
  36. 36. 15 Instructional designprinciples found in video games1. Identity 10. Situated meaning2. Interaction 11. Pleasantly frustrating3. Production 12. System thinking4. Risk taking 13. Explore, think laterally, rethink goals5. Customization 14. Smart tools and distributed knowledge6. Agency 15. Cross functional teams7. Well ordered problems James Paul Gee identified15 instructional design principles in his paper:8. Challenge and consolidation “Good Video Games and Good Learning”9. “Just in time” and “On demand”
  37. 37. Identity James Paul Gee identified15 instructional design principles in his paper: “Good Video Games and Good Learning”
  38. 38. Interaction James Paul Gee identified15 instructional design principles in his paper: “Good Video Games and Good Learning”
  39. 39. Production James Paul Gee identified15 instructional design principles in his paper: “Good Video Games and Good Learning”
  40. 40. Risk taking James Paul Gee identified15 instructional design principles in his paper: “Good Video Games and Good Learning”
  41. 41. Customization James Paul Gee identified15 instructional design principles in his paper: “Good Video Games and Good Learning”
  42. 42. Agency James Paul Gee identified15 instructional design principles in his paper: “Good Video Games and Good Learning”
  43. 43. Well ordered problems James Paul Gee identified15 instructional design principles in his paper: “Good Video Games and Good Learning”
  44. 44. Challenge and consolidation James Paul Gee identified15 instructional design principles in his paper: “Good Video Games and Good Learning”
  45. 45. “Just in Time” and “On Demand” James Paul Gee identified15 instructional design principles in his paper: “Good Video Games and Good Learning”
  46. 46. Situated meanings James Paul Gee identified15 instructional design principles in his paper: “Good Video Games and Good Learning”
  47. 47. Pleasantly frustrating James Paul Gee identified15 instructional design principles in his paper: “Good Video Games and Good Learning”
  48. 48. System thinking James Paul Gee identified15 instructional design principles in his paper: “Good Video Games and Good Learning”
  49. 49. Explore, think laterally, rethink goals James Paul Gee identified15 instructional design principles in his paper: “Good Video Games and Good Learning”
  50. 50. Smart tools and distributed knowledge James Paul Gee identified15 instructional design principles in his paper: “Good Video Games and Good Learning”
  51. 51. Cross functional teams James Paul Gee identified15 instructional design principles in his paper: “Good Video Games and Good Learning”
  52. 52. Performance before competence James Paul Gee identified15 instructional design principles in his paper: “Good Video Games and Good Learning”
  53. 53. Boss battlesProgression loop 53
  54. 54. Flowchallenge skill From Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi 54
  55. 55. Conditions of flow• Clear goals• Immediate feedback• Skills match challenge• Deep concentration• Problems forgotten• Control is possible• Self-Consciousness disappears• Altered time• Intrinsically rewarding Gregory, E. (2008). Understanding Video Gaming’s Engagement: Flow and Its Application to Interactive Media. Media Psychology Review. Vol. 1(1) 55
  56. 56. Technologies for implementinggame mechanics• LMS• Game development platforms 56
  57. 57. Syllabus for a gamed classroom Spring 2012The Multiplayer Classroom, DesigningCoursework as a GameBy Lee Sheldon
  58. 58. From my syllabus Grading Policy This course will function like a role playing game, where you work for WeevilTech Game Studio. I will be your boss. Your grades will be assigned like experience points, you level up to get a better grade. Everybody starts with zero points. Your goal should be to become a full time employee for WeevilTech Game Studio, by successfully completing all projects and attending and participating in all virtual project meetings. We have roughly 15 weeks for this course. We will cover the first eight chapters of the book. There will be a test and assignment for each chapter. We will have meetings twice a week called “SCRUM” meetings. Discussion boards will be used for the meeting. You will be graded for your participation in these meetings. There will be a final project in this class, and a short 1000 word essay. END OF COURSE TEAM PROJECT 1. The teams will be selected randomly 2. We will develop a game with a UAM theme 3. The required format and delivery of the project materials will be determined 5. The grade will be given on a 100 point scale
  59. 59. From my syllabus Scoring System for Class Grades Level Xp points Letter Grade Employee 2640-3300 A Intern 1980-2639 B Rookie 1320-1979 C n00b 660-1319 D Nublet 0-559 F Point Distribution 8 exams 100 pts each 800 8 weekly assignments 100 pts each 800 15 pre sprint meetings 50 pts each 750 15 post sprint meetings 50 pts each 750 Final Project 100 pts each 100 Final Paper 100 pts each 100 Total Points 3300
  60. 60. SAMR by PuenteduraTechnologies at this twolevels fall into thetransformation categoryTechnologies at this twolevels fall into theenhancement category http://hippasus.com/resources/tte/ 60
  61. 61. It’s not all roses• Some educators worry that teachers haven’t been sufficiently trained to integrate video games into schools.http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/09/25/education-nation-why-educ_n_1912506.html
  62. 62. Developing your own games 62
  63. 63. Institutional concerns 63
  64. 64. The future of gaming 64
  65. 65. Identify the gamified element 65
  66. 66. Each time you see one of these “GameElement” symbols, take note. Game ElementAt the end of the workshop, we will see howmany game elements used during the workshopthat we can identify. 66
  67. 67. Game Element Where does this story begin?
  68. 68. Game Element My quest was started
  69. 69. Game Element Then, I leveled up
  70. 70. Game Element Ice - breaker
  71. 71. Where will my quest taking me next?
  72. 72. Thank you for participating!• GamedLearning.com• Twitter: @GamedLearning

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