Patrick Sorgeloos: Aquaculture nutrition: addressing the long-term sustainability of the sector

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Patrick Sorgeloos: Aquaculture nutrition: addressing the long-term sustainability of the sector

  1. 1. Brussels Development Briefing n.32 Fish-farming the new driver of the blue economy? 3rd July 2013 http://brusselsbriefings.net Aquaculture nutrition and long-term sustainability of the sector. Patrick Sorgeloos, University of Ghent, Belgium
  2. 2. Aquaculture nutrition and long-term sustainability of the sector Patrick Sorgeloos, Ghent University, Belgium Fish-farming: the new driver of the blue economy? Brussels Policy Briefing No 32 – July 3, 2013
  3. 3. resulting in new concepts & products for a sustainable aquaculture from an empiricial approach towards a knowledge-based bio-industry
  4. 4. “Aquaculture is probably the fastest growing food-producing sector, and currently accounts for almost 50% of the world’s food fish and is perceived as having the greatest potential to meet the growing demand for aquatic food.” “Given the projected population growth over the next two decades, it is estimated that by 2030 at least an additional 40 million tons/year of aquatic food will be required to maintain the current per caput consumption.”
  5. 5. Courtesy Harache
  6. 6. The fish meal / fish oil contradiction Full independence from fisheries stocks for LIPID AND PROTEIN INGREDIENTS in aquaculture feeds
  7. 7. EXTRACTIVE aquaculture nutrient recycling FED aquaculture
  8. 8. FOOD aquaculture Asia, esp. China - long history - large production - integrated farming FOOD versus BUSINESS aquaculture BUSINESS aquaculture Recent developments (since 1960s) • Japan, later Europe, America’s, etc • successful new industry • monoculture
  9. 9. FOOD aquaculture BUSINESS aquaculture Asia, esp. China - long history - large production - integrated farming Recent developments (since 1960s) • Japan, later Europe, America’s, etc • successful new industry • monoculture FOOD versus BUSINESS aquaculture
  10. 10. PANGASIUS CATFISH FARMING IN VIETNAM > 1,000,000 TONS/YEAR Success stories in business aquaculture
  11. 11. 17.5 31.2 41.5 60 80 100 172 232 286 340 380 500 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2005 Annualyield(103ton) Year CHINESE MITTEN CRAB Eriocheir sinensis annual production yields Success stories in food aquaculture
  12. 12. integration of culture of different trophic levels MACROALGAE MOLLUSCS FINFISH
  13. 13. 8 km
  14. 14. resulting in new concepts & products for a sustainable aquaculture from an empiricial approach towards a knowledge-based bio-industry
  15. 15. - Complete independence from natural stocks through DOMESTICATION - Improved / more cost-effective SEED PRODUCTION - Better targeted SPECIES SELECTION - Development of more efficient stocks through SELECTIVE BREEDING - More MICROBIAL MANAGEMENT for more sustainable production - Better understanding of IMMUNE SYSTEMS in vertebrates and invertebrates - More INTEGRATED PRODUCTION SYSTEMS for plant and animal farming - COASTAL AND OFF-SHORE FARMS of food and energy - Full independence from fisheries stocks for LIPID AND PROTEIN INGREDIENTS in aquatic feeds - More attention for INTEGRATION of restocking activities with FISHERIES management - SOCIETAL LEVERAGE: - multi-stakeholder interaction - international cooperation on a win-win basis
  16. 16. Microbes “run the world”
  17. 17. 70 % of all farmed fish are produced in ponds What is the role of the microflora ? Recent documentation: 30 % N contribution from bio flocs ! BIO FLOCS more MICROBIAL MANAGEMENT for more sustainable production
  18. 18. Volume of bioflocs formed per day in differen C/N regimes C/N 10 C/N 50
  19. 19. molluscs Artemia biomass Biofloc consumers
  20. 20. from Cunningham, “Knowledge Based Bio-Economy towards 2020” Brussels, September 14, 2010 Oceans 70% Crops 5% Pasture 7% Forest 9% Other 9% (cities 1.5%) Global resources
  21. 21. Global primary production and food supply total bioproduction contribution to food supply terrestrial marine from Field et al. (1998) and Duarte et al. (2009) plants & animals fisheries & aquaculture plants & animals proteins quantity 16 % of proteins 2 % in quantity
  22. 22. - full independence from fishmeal and fish oil is not the only priority -

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