Literacy & Learning

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My 081710 presentation for ELSAC

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  • William - DID science and engineering – but he could do it because he could make sense of words, symbols, and visualizations!”..on average, scientists read for 553 hours per year or 23% of total work time. When the activities of speaking and writing are included as well, the scientists in the study spent on average of 58% of their total working time in communication or working in the coordination space. More iportantly, scienits and engineers were found to consider reading as essential to their work and as their primary source of creative simulation. Thus the dominant practice in science and engineering is not “hands-on” manipulation of the material world bur rather a “inds-on” social and cognitive engagement with ideas, evidence and argument. Reading for instance is an act of inqiry into meaning – an attempt to construct sesnse from multiple forso representation used in science – words, symbols, mathematics, charts, graphs and visualizations..”
  • Mathematical ecologyMathematical representations of ecological systems
  • "Adolescents entering the adult world in the 21st century will read and write more than at any other time in human history. They will need advanced levels of literacy to perform their jobs, run their households, act as citizens, and conduct their personal lives.”-- Richard Vaca Content Area Reading: Literacy and Learning Across the Curriculum
  • Don’t forget – prereading! What do YOU think this story is about?
  • People are not blank slates!Knowledge in context and organizedmetacognition
  • People are not blank slates!Knowledge in context and organizedmetacognition
  • Content is understood in the context that it is learned.genuine learning can only occur within a context that is meaningful and relevant to the learner. —Paulo Freire, Pedagogy of the Oppressed
  • Randy Berndt
  • Wikipedia is pretty cool – and relatively accurate (more than many print encyclopedias – especially for mature articles)How many of your students have used it?How many of you have used it?How many of you have asked your students to create content for it?
  • http://weblogs.pbspaces.com/mrskolbert/2010/05/19/science-explanations-in-plain-english/
  • Randy Berndt
  • Literacy & Learning

    1. 1. Helping students learn through<br /><ul><li>Literacy,
    2. 2. Technology, and
    3. 3. Authentic projects.</li></ul> Eric Brunsell<br /> University of Wisconsin - Oshkosh<br />
    4. 4. Why literacy <br />in the <br />content areas?<br />How do students learn?<br />
    5. 5. Why literacy <br />in the <br />content areas?<br />Playing<br />with a <br />Purpose*<br />How do students learn?<br />*Props to @MrTRice_Science<br />
    6. 6. Image Source: Duke Yearlook’sFlickrPhotostream<br />
    7. 7. Stoopid!<br />Image Source: Duke Yearlook’sFlickrPhotostream<br />
    8. 8. Literacy is an active phenomenon. Its power lies not in a received ability to read and write, but rather in an individual’s capacity to put those skills to work in shaping the course of his or her own life.<br /> —Paulo Freire<br />Pedagogy of the Oppressed <br />Kamkwamba’s Story<br />
    9. 9.
    10. 10. ”..on average, scientists read 23% of total work time. When the activities of speaking and writing are included as well, the scientists in the study spent on average of 58% of their total working time… scientists and engineers were found to consider reading as essential to their work and as their primary source of creative simulation. <br />Thus the dominant practice in science and engineering is not “hands-on” manipulation of the material world but rather a “minds-on” social and cognitive engagement with ideas, evidence and argument. <br />Reading for instance is an act of inquiry into meaning – an attempt to construct sense from multiple forms of representation used in science – words, symbols, mathematics, charts, graphs and visualizations..”<br />National Academies of Science: Framework for New Science Education Standards<br />
    11. 11. As a mathematician, literacy skills are very important. I think one of the most important of these skills is critical reading. It is very possible for us to spend a day or more on one page in a paper we are reading. When we read papers, we do so with pencil in hand and frequently pause in our reading to verify the mathematics and check our own understanding. Often this involves reading other sources and creating examples. <br /> --Dr. Amy Parrott<br />Department of Mathematics<br />University of Wisconsin Oshkosh<br />
    12. 12. Top 5<br />21st Century Skill<br />ACT National Curriculum Survey 2009 Results<br />Image Source: See-ming Lee’s Flickrphotostream<br />
    13. 13. College professors don’t tech it.<br />High School teachers <br />don’t teach it.<br />ACT National Curriculum Survey 2009 Results<br />
    14. 14. ACT National Curriculum Survey 2009 Results<br />
    15. 15. Image Source: tjuck_el'sFlickrphotostream<br />
    16. 16. Why literacy <br />in the <br />content areas?<br />How do students learn?<br />
    17. 17.
    18. 18. Fish is Fish<br /> by Leo Lionni<br />Donavan & Bransford (2005) How students learn history, mathematics and science in the classroom, National Academies Press, Washington D.C.<br />
    19. 19. Fish is Fish, by Leo Lionni<br />
    20. 20. Donavan & Bransford (2005) How students learn history, mathematics and science in the classroom, National Academies Press, Washington D.C.<br />Principles of Learning<br />Preconceptions<br />Context & Organization<br />Metacognition<br />Fish is Fish, by Leo Lionni<br />
    21. 21. Knowledge, we suggest, similarly indexes the situation in which it arises and is used. The embedding circumstances efficiently provide essential parts of its structure and meaning. So knowledge, which comes coded by and connected to the activity and environment in which it is developed, is spread across its component parts, some of which are in the mind and some in the world much as the final picture on a jigsaw is spread across its component pieces.<br />Brown, Collings, and Duguid. (1989) <br />
    22. 22. Knowledge, we suggest, similarly indexes the situation in which it arises and is used. The embedding circumstances efficiently provide essential parts of its structure and meaning. So knowledge, which comes coded by and connected to the activity and environment in which it is developed, is spread across its component parts, some of which are in the mind and some in the world much as the final picture on a jigsaw is spread across its component pieces.<br />X<br />N<br />CONTE T<br />CONTE T<br />Brown, Collings, and Duguid. (1989) <br />
    23. 23. Knowledge, we suggest, similarly indexes the situation in which it arises and is used. The embedding circumstances efficiently provide essential parts of its structure and meaning. So knowledge, which comes coded by and connected to the activity and environment in which it is developed, is spread across its component parts, some of which are in the mind and some in the world much as the final picture on a jigsaw is spread across its component pieces.<br />Authenticity<br />problem…process...audience<br />Brown, Collings, and Duguid. (1989) <br />
    24. 24. Knowledge, we suggest, similarly indexes the situation in which it arises and is used. The embedding circumstances efficiently provide essential parts of its structure and meaning. So knowledge, which comes coded by and connected to the activity and environment in which it is developed, is spread across its component parts, some of which are in the mind and some in the world much as the final picture on a jigsaw is spread across its component pieces.<br />Empowerment<br />trust & risk-taking<br />Brown, Collings, and Duguid. (1989) <br />
    25. 25. Knowledge, we suggest, similarly indexes the situation in which it arises and is used. The embedding circumstances efficiently provide essential parts of its structure and meaning. So knowledge, which comes coded by and connected to the activity and environment in which it is developed, is spread across its component parts, some of which are in the mind and some in the world much as the final picture on a jigsaw is spread across its component pieces.<br />Content Rich<br />Brown, Collings, and Duguid. (1989) <br />
    26. 26. Why literacy <br />in the <br />content areas?<br />Playing<br />with a <br />Purpose*<br />How do students learn?<br />*Props to @MrTRice_Science<br />
    27. 27. Brunsell, E. and Cimino, C. (2009) Investigating the impact of a weekly weblog assignment on the learning environment in a secondary biology course. In Education, 15(2)<br />Flickr: jepoirrier'sphotostream<br />Flickr: jepoirrier's photostream<br />
    28. 28. More than a Shiny Object?<br />In the initial survey, only 33% of students had a positive outlook on classroom blogging. <br />JayRazz’sFlickrphotostream<br />
    29. 29. Flickr: jepoirrier'sphotostream<br />Flickr: jepoirrier's photostream<br />
    30. 30. Flickr: jepoirrier'sphotostream<br />
    31. 31. “<br />94% of students used resources NOT provided by the teacher as they participated in blog assignments<br />Mr_Stein'sphotostream<br />
    32. 32. Face-to-Face Participation<br />Week 8<br />72%<br />Week 1<br />17%<br />Whiskeygonebad’sFlickrphotostream<br />
    33. 33. Face-to-Face Participation<br />“After getting used to talking to everyone on the blog it didn’t seem like such a big deal to give an answer in class.” <br />Week 8<br />72%<br />Week 1<br />17%<br />“In the beginning of the class I was afraid to raise my hand and look stupid. The blog assignments made me feel more confident each week so I was no longer afraid to look stupid.” <br />Whiskeygonebad’sFlickrphotostream<br />
    34. 34. More than a Shiny Object?<br />By the fifth week of completing blog assignments, all but one student (97%) had positive perceptions of the project and that one was indifferent. <br />JayRazz’sFlickrphotostream<br />
    35. 35. Image Source: hekeinjapan’sFlickrphotostream<br />
    36. 36. Image Source: hekeinjapan’sFlickrphotostream<br />
    37. 37. Science in Plain English…<br />
    38. 38. TALONS Socials Wiki 2009 – 2010<br />This living record of the TALONS' study of history<br />
    39. 39.
    40. 40. CHRISTIAN LONG<br />The Question<br />What happens when 80 10th grade students watch, analyze, and reflect upon 640+ TED Talks in pursuit of the answer to the question, <br />"What Matters (To Us)"?<br />Students:<br /><ul><li>Watch, listen and analyze
    41. 41. Reflect and write
    42. 42. Present their ideas in multiple ways</li></li></ul><li>
    43. 43. Playing with Purpose<br />Authenticity<br /> Empowerment<br /> Content Rich<br />Image Source: Old Shoe Woman’s Flickrphotostream<br />
    44. 44. What questions do you have?<br />
    45. 45. I tried…and I made it.<br /> -- William Kamkwamba<br />

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