Nuclear Medicine

302 views

Published on

Published in: Health & Medicine, Education
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Nuclear Medicine

  1. 1. Why Children’s? Children Aren’t Just Small Adults At Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, we know children aren’t just small adults. Injuries and diseases do not affect a child’s growing body the same as an adult. State-of-the-art equipment and precise protocols, specially configured for children, are needed to accurately diagnose problems and minimize radiation exposure. Every patient at Children’s, from a newborn to a high school athlete, receives specialized support and care. Our commitment to excellence is highlighted by Children’s being ranked among U.S.News & World Report’s top pediatric hospitals and one of the top 10 children’s hospitals nationwide by Child magazine. National Leader Children’s is a national leader in pediatric radiology, performing more than 200,000 procedures a year. We offer a complete range of services for the evaluation of pediatric disease including ultrasound, fluoroscopy, X-ray, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), nuclear medicine, bone densitometry and interventional radiology. Our nuclear medicine programs are accredited by the American College of Radiology. Experts in Pediatric Radiology Radiologists at Children’s are board certified with additional training in pediatric imaging and are always available for consultation with your child’s doctor. Images are routinely reviewed before your child leaves. This ensures all needed images are obtained and are of high quality. Board-certified pediatric sedation doctors at Children’s provide safe, individualized expert care to patients. Care Designed for Children Our technologists, nurses and child life specialists interact with children every day and understand their special needs and how to help them if they are scared. Our child-friendly facilities are less intimidating, customized for kids and ideal for imaging children. State-of-the-art Technology Smaller body parts are more difficult to distinguish on an image than adults, and require state-of-the-art technology. Children’s has advanced nuclear medicine testing equipment in order to reduce the length of the exam. Additionally, radiologists at Children’s are experts in making adjustments to nuclear medicine imaging protocols so radiation doses are significantly reduced compared to adult studies. What is a Nuclear Medicine Test? Nuclear medicine testing is a method of diagnostic imaging that uses very small amounts of radioactive material. The child is injected with, or swallows, a liquid that contains a radioactive substance, which collects in the part of the body to be imaged. Sophisticated instruments detect the radioactive substance in the body and process that information into an image. This allows the pediatric radiologist to make a diagnosis based on the images taken. You may stay with your child during the nuclear medicine test. Brothers, sisters and pregnant mothers will not be allowed in the room. Who Performs the Test? A nuclear medicine technologist is a person trained in these special imaging techniques. Nuclear Medicine Exam:________________________________________________ Mon. Tues. Wed. Thurs. Fri. Sat. Date:_____________________ Time:_____________________ Children’s at Egleston Children’s at Scottish Rite The Children’s Medical Office Building (Located at Children’s at Scottish Rite) Please plan to arrive at:_____________________ ACC R EDITED FACIL ITY
  2. 2. Who Looks at the Pictures? A pediatric radiologist, a doctor specially trained in children’s X-rays, takes the pictures and checks the images to make sure they are of good quality. Before Your Arrival Please bring your child’s medications to the nuclear medicine appointment. You will be asked to provide a list of your child’s medications and information regarding your child’s injury or illness prior to the exam. This information helps us to better care for your child. Are There any Risks? Radiation in general is a risk. However, the amount of radiation used to take the pictures is the smallest amount possible to get the best images. The amount of radioisotope used (injected or swallowed) is so small that it poses no great health risk. The dose given is based on your child’s size and weight. A parent or legal guardian must be present to give permission for the procedure and the use of radioisotope. If there is a chance the parent or legal guardian is pregnant, we ask that she not be in the exam room—even when wearing a lead apron. What Happens After the Test? – The technologist may review your child’s pictures to make sure the images are high quality and that additional testing is not needed. – The technologist will give you any special instructions and tell you when your child can leave. – If your child is sedated, he will need to stay at the hospital until he is awake and can eat and drink. Wake up times will vary from child to child. – After the test your child may eat and drink as usual, unless your child’s doctor tells you not to feed him. When do I get Results? – The radiologist will review the pictures and send a report to your child’s doctor. – If there is a serious problem that requires treatment, your child’s doctor will be notified before you leave the Radiology department. – Your child’s doctor will contact you with the test results in about two to three business days. Results for some more complicated exams may take up to 14 business days. – Call your child’s doctor if you have not heard any test results after three business days. What are the Most Common Nuclear Medicine Tests? Bone Scan A bone scan uses a special camera to take pictures of your child’s bones. HOW ARE PICTURES TAKEN FOR A BONE SCAN? The nuclear medicine technologist (a person trained in taking these special pictures) will bring you and your child into the exam room. – Your child will need to change into a hospital gown. – We want to take the fewest number of images as quickly as possible, so we may ask you to help hold your child. – Before the test begins, a small I.V. (a needle put into a vein in your child’s hand, arm or foot) will be started. – A special substance called a radioisotope (tiny amounts of a radioactive liquid) is given through the I.V. – It takes two to three hours for the radioactive material to collect in the bones. Pictures will be taken immediately after the injection and up to three hours after the injection is given. – When it is time for the test, your child will lie down on a special table with a safety belt over him. The nuclear medicine camera is over the table and comes close to, but does not touch, your child. – Your child needs to lie still for the test. There are CDs available for your child to listen to or your child can watch a video or TV while having the test. PREPARATIONS Children should not have any tests involving barium for two days prior to the bone scan. If your child is age 4 or younger, sedation may be required for the exam. If sedation is required, be sure to follow these feeding instructions: – Six hours before exam: No milk, formula, solid food or orange juice. May have clear liquids such as water, apple juice without pulp, Pedialyte® , Popsicles® and Jell-O® without fruit – Four hours before exam: No breast milk, clear liquids only. Clear liquids include water, apple juice without pulp, Pedialyte® , Popsicles® and Jell-O® without fruit – Two hours before exam: Nothing by mouth (No food, gum, hard candy or liquids) Children’s is a national leader in pediatric radiology.
  3. 3. DMSA Renal Scan A DMSA renal scan uses a special camera to take pictures of your child’s kidneys. HOW ARE PICTURES TAKEN FOR A DMSA RENAL SCAN? The nuclear medicine technologist (a person trained in taking these special pictures) will bring you and your child into the exam room. – Your child will need to change into a hospital gown. – Before the test begins, a small I.V. (a needle put into a vein in your child’s hand, arm or foot) will be started. – A special substance called a radioisotope (tiny amounts of a radioactive liquid) is given through the I.V. – Sometimes, pictures cannot be taken until two to three hours after the radioisotope is given. If your child needs to wait for the scan, you and your child may leave the hospital. Your child may not eat during this time. The technologist will tell you when to come back for the test. – When it is time for the test, your child will lie down on a special table with a safety belt over him. The nuclear medicine camera is over the table and comes close to, but does not touch, your child. – Your child needs to lie still for the test. The pictures take about 40 minutes to complete, but can take longer based on your child’s needs. There are CDs available for your child to listen to or your child can watch a video or TV while having the test. PREPARATIONS Children should not have any test involving barium for two days prior to the DMSA renal scan. If your child is age 4 or younger, sedation may be required for the exam. If sedation is required, be sure to follow these feeding instructions: – Six hours before exam: No milk, formula, solid food or orange juice. May have clear liquids such as water, apple juice without pulp, Pedialyte® , Popsicles® and Jell-O® without fruit – Four hours before exam: No breast milk, clear liquids only. Clear liquids include water, apple juice without pulp, Pedialyte® , Popsicles® and Jell-O® without fruit – Two hours before exam: Nothing by mouth (No food, gum, hard candy or liquids) Meckel’s Scan A Meckel’s scan uses a special camera to look at your child’s bowels (intestines). A Meckel’s scan helps doctors check for a Meckel’s diverticulum—an abnormal sac found in the lower part of the bowel that may cause blockage or bleeding. HOW ARE PICTURES TAKEN FOR A MECKEL’S SCAN? The nuclear medicine technologist (a person trained in taking these special pictures) will bring you and your child into the exam room. – Your child will need to change into a hospital gown. – Before the test begins, a small I.V. (a needle put into a vein in your child’s hand, arm or foot) will be started. – A special substance called a radioisotope (tiny amounts of a radioactive liquid) is given through the I.V. – When it is time for the test, your child will lie down on a special table with a safety belt over him. The nuclear medicine camera is over the table and comes close to, but does not touch, your child. – Your child needs to lie still for the test. The test takes about 30 minutes to complete, but can take longer based on your child’s needs. There are CDs available for your child to listen to or your child can watch a video or TV while having the test. PREPARATIONS All patients should have nothing to eat or drink four hours prior to the exam. If your child is age 4 or younger, sedation may be required for the exam. If sedation is required, be sure to follow these feeding instructions: – Six hours before exam: No milk, formula, solid food or orange juice. May have clear liquids such as water, apple juice without pulp, Pedialyte® , Popsicles® and Jell-O® without fruit – Four hours before exam: Nothing by mouth (No food, gum, hard candy or liquids) Hepatobiliary (HIDA) Scan A HIDA scan uses a special camera to take pictures of your child’s gallbladder, liver and bile ducts. HOW ARE PICTURES TAKEN FOR A HIDA SCAN? The nuclear medicine technologist (a person trained in taking these special pictures) will bring you and your child into the exam room. – Your child will need to change into a hospital gown. – Before the test begins, a small I.V. (a needle put into a vein in your child’s hand, arm or foot) will be started. – A special substance called a radioisotope (tiny amounts of a radioactive liquid) is given through the I.V. – When it is time for the test, your child will lie down on a special table with a safety belt over him. The nuclear medicine camera is over the table and comes close to, but does not touch, your child. – Your child needs to lie still for the test. The test takes about one to two hours to complete, but can take longer based on your child’s needs. There are CDs available for your child to listen to or your child can watch a video or TV while having the test. PREPARATIONS – Children should have nothing to eat or drink for six hours prior to the test. – No opiate containing medications (pain medications) for one day prior to the test (call the Radiology department with questions). – No test involving barium for two days prior to the exam. If your child is age 4 or younger, sedation may be required for the exam. If sedation is required, be sure to follow these feeding instructions: – Six hours before exam: Nothing by mouth (No food, gum, hard candy or liquids)
  4. 4. Gastric Emptying/Gastroesophageal (GE) Reflux Study A gastric emptying/GE reflux study uses a special camera to take pictures of your child’s stomach and throat. It checks to see if the stomach is emptying as it should and if any food is going back up (refluxing) into the throat. WHAT TO DO BEFORE THE TEST? – Bring your child’s favorite food and drink from home to give your child for the test. For infants, bring formula or juice. – A special substance called a radioisotope (tiny amounts of a radioactive liquid) is added to the food or drink for your child to swallow. The medicine has no taste or smell. HOW ARE PICTURES TAKEN FOR A GASTRIC EMPTYING/GE REFLUX STUDY? The nuclear medicine technologist (a person trained in taking these special pictures) will bring you and your child into the exam room. – Your child will need to change into a hospital gown. – Once your child takes the radioisotope, your child will lie down on a special table with a safety belt over him. The nuclear medicine camera is over the table and comes close to, but does not touch, your child. – Your child needs to lie still for the test. The pictures may take two hours to complete, but can take longer based on your child’s needs. There are CDs available for your child to listen to or your child can watch a video or TV while having the test. – Sometimes, your child may need to wait an hour and then have more tests. Make sure your child does not eat or drink during this time. When your child comes back for the test, it will take several minutes to complete. PREPARATIONS – Children should have nothing to eat or drink six hours prior to the exam. – No test involving barium two days prior to the exam. If your child is age 4 or younger, sedation may be required for the exam. If sedation is required, be sure to follow these feeding instructions: – Six hours before exam: Nothing by mouth (No food, gum, hard candy or liquids) Nuclear Cystogram A nuclear cystogram is a test done to check for vesicoureteral reflux (reflux from the bladder back to the ureter). HOW ARE PICTURES TAKEN FOR A NUCLEAR CYSTOGRAM STUDY? The nuclear medicine technologist (a person trained in taking these special pictures) will bring you and your child into the exam room. – Your child will need to change into a hospital gown. – Your child will lie down on a special table with a safety belt over him. The nuclear medicine camera is over the table and comes close to, but does not touch, your child. – The technologist will insert a urinary catheter into your child’s bladder. – The technologist will hook up a bag of saline to the urinary catheter and inject a radioisotope (tiny amounts of a radioactive liquid), along with the saline, into the catheter running into your child’s bladder. – The bladder is filled with the saline and radioisotope until full and then drained back into the saline bag by gravity. This process of filling the bladder with saline and radioisotope is performed one more time before the catheter is removed. Then your child will empty his bladder (urinate) into a container. – Pictures of your child’s bladder are taken during the filling and draining process described above. – Your child needs to lie still for the test. The pictures may take an hour to complete, but can take longer based on your child’s needs. There are CDs available for your child to listen to or your child can watch a video or TV while having the test. PREPARATIONS No preparations necessary. How Can I Help My Child? Studies show that children cope better with medical procedures when they are well prepared ahead of time. Parents are better able to help their children when they are prepared as well. If possible, make arrangements in advance for the care of any brothers or sisters on the day of the test. You will want to focus on caring for the child who is having the tests. Infants Although you cannot explain the test to your baby, you can help your baby feel more secure during the test if you: – Bring a special blanket, toy or pacifier. – Comfort your baby with your presence and voice. – Bring along a bottle of juice or formula to feed your baby after all tests are done. Toddlers and Preschool-age Children Young children can become anxious about having a test done, so the best time to talk with your child is right before the test. – On the day of the test, tell your child that he will be having some “pictures” taken, so your child’s doctor can help him feel better. – Use simple words and be honest with your child. – If it is going to be uncomfortable (to hold still in a specific position) or hurt, talk with your child about it and let your child know it is OK to cry. – Let your child know that it is important for him to remain still while the pictures are being taken. – Let your child know that you will stay with him as much as possible during the test. – When you come to the hospital, bring a favorite book, toy or blanket for your child. You may also bring along a snack for after the test.
  5. 5. How Can I Help My Child? (continued) School-age Children School-age children have good imaginations and may frighten themselves by imagining something much worse than the actual test. – One or two days before the test, tell your child that he is going to the hospital to have some “pictures” taken of his body. – Use simple words. Be honest with your child and explain exactly what will happen. – If it is going to be uncomfortable (to hold still in a specific position) or hurt, talk with your child about it and let your child know it is OK to cry. – Let your child know that it is important for him to remain still while the pictures are being taken. – Let your child know that you will stay with him as much as possible during the test. – When you come to the hospital, bring along a favorite, book, toy or game for your child. You may also bring along a snack for after the test. Preregistration To help make sure your insurance requirements have been met, and to speed your registration process, you may choose to preregister. Preregistration is available online 24 hours a day, seven days a week at www.choa.org/radiology. Once the form is completed and submitted, you should hear from a preregistration representative within one business day. You can also call our preregistration hotline at 404-785-5605. Pre-authorization Most insurance plans require that your child’s doctor obtains pre-authorization (sometimes referred to as pre-certification) for nuclear medicine exams. To ensure that your child’s exam can be completed on the appointment date, please consider checking with your child’s doctor or insurance plan to ensure that the authorization has been completed. Children’s is Growing for You Children’s is currently undergoing a $344 million expansion. Children’s is nearly doubling in space to address the rapid growth in Atlanta’s pediatric population and the needs of Georgia’s children. Please add an extra 15 minutes to your commute for parking when visiting our hospital campuses due to high patient volume and construction activities. Parking There is a charge for parking at Children’s. Discounted coupons are available for those who anticipate multiple visits. Valet service is offered at Children’s at Scottish Rite. Appointments Call the Children’s Radiology scheduling centers for an appointment: Children’s at Egleston 404-785-6078 Children’s at Scottish Rite 404-785-2787 Please call Children’s at Scottish Rite for appointments at the Children’s Medical Office Building. Our scheduling centers are open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday to Friday. If you need to cancel, reschedule or confirm an appointment, please call the scheduling center. If canceling or rescheduling, please call at least three business days prior to the scheduled appointment. This will allow us the opportunity to give your appointment to another patient. If you are running late, please call the scheduling center. Every effort will be made to keep your appointment on the same day; however, it may be necessary to reschedule your appointment. Please refer to www.choa.org/radiology for any additional information regarding our services. Some physicians and affiliated healthcare professionals who perform services at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta are independent providers and are not our employees.
  6. 6. Children’s at Egleston From I-85 North: – Take Exit 89 (North Druid Hills Road) – Turn right onto North Druid Hills Road and drive east for a .5 mile – Turn right onto Briarcliff Road (42 South) – Drive 2 miles and turn left onto Clifton Road – Travel about 1.5 miles on Clifton Road – You will pass the Children’s Cystic Fibrosis Center on your left – Just past Haygood Drive, turn left into the Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta Emergency driveway – Follow the signs to visitor parking From I-85 South: – Take Exit 89 (North Druid Hills Road) – Turn left onto North Druid Hills Road and drive east for a .5 mile – Turn right onto Briarcliff Road (42 South) – Drive 2 miles and turn left onto Clifton Road – Travel about 1.5 miles on Clifton Road – You will pass the Children’s Cystic Fibrosis Center on your left – Just past Haygood Drive, turn left into the Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta Emergency driveway – Follow the signs to visitor parking Children’s at Egleston: – Once you arrive, you may park in visitor parking located behind the hospital. Please exit visitor parking by taking the visitor parking elevator down to the ground floor. – An information desk is located on the ground floor for your convenience. – Once exiting the visitor parking elevators, take a right and follow the signs to Admissions. – Admissions is located on the first floor and can be accessed by taking the patient elevators located on the ground floor. – Once you exit the elevator on the first floor, take a left. Admissions will be on your right. Your child will be registered in Admissions and then directed to the Radiology department. ©2006Children’sHealthcareofAtlanta,Inc.Allrightsreserved./RAD920309.mw.8/06 Glenridge Connector Johnson Ferry Road JohnsonFerryRoad Peachtree -DunwoodyRoad Peachtree-DunwoodyRoad GlenridgeDriveGlenridgeConnector MeridianMarkRoad 400 285 400 285 Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta at Scottish Rite To I-285 West Exit 26 Exit 4A Glenridge Connector Exit 28 Peachtree-Dunwoody Rd. Exit 3 1001 Johnson Ferry Road N S W E Children’s at Scottish Rite From I-285 East: – Take Exit 26 (Glenridge Drive) – Turn right onto Glenridge Drive – Turn left onto Johnson Ferry Road – Turn right on Meridian Mark Road – The Main Entrance to the hospital is on the left From I-285 West: – Take Exit 28 (Peachtree-Dunwoody Road) – Turn left onto Peachtree-Dunwoody Road – Turn right on Johnson Ferry Road – Turn left on Meridian Mark – The Main Entrance to the hospital is on the left From GA-400 North: – Take Exit 4A (Glenridge Connector) – Turn right onto Glenridge Connector – Turn left at Meridian Mark Road – The Main Entrance to the hospital is on the right From GA-400 South: – Take Exit 3 (Glenridge Connector) – Turn right onto Glenridge Connector – Turn left at Meridian Mark Road – The Main Entrance to the hospital is on the right Children’s at Scottish Rite: – Once you arrive, you may use the valet service or park in visitor parking. – Please follow the wooden covered walkway until you reach the information desk located in the hospital lobby. – Please report to Radiology registration located at the main entrance of the hospital. – Once you enter the building, turn right into Radiology registration. The Children’s Medical Office Building (Located at Children’s at Scottish Rite): – Once you arrive at Children’s at Scottish Rite, you may use the valet service or park in the visitor parking lot. – Please follow the brick covered walkway to the large brick building located directly across the street from the hospital. – The Children’s Medical Office Building is located next to the hospital. – Radiology is located on the first floor of the Children’s Medical Office Building. When you enter the building, walk past the elevators and take a right. – The Radiology department is located at the end of the hall, Suite 180. N orth Druid Hills Road BriarcliffRoadBriarcliffRoad Lav istaRoad Clifton Road Haygood DriveG atewoo d Ave. H ouston M illRoad Clairmont R oad Buf ord H w y. North Decatur Road Ponce De Leon Ave. Lavista Road 285 85 Exit 89 North Druid Hills Rd. Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta at Egleston 1405 Clifton Road NE 85 N S W E Children need Children’s®

×