Getting and Using Current Career Data to Help Students ...

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  • As the School-to-Career Coordinator for the Wake County Public School System, it is my responsibility to make sure that every student has explored all of their career options and has some kind of career direction when they graduate from high school.
    The job market has changed considerably from when we graduated from high school. Many of the careers our current students will have - have not even been thought of yet, which makes career preparation an even bigger challenge.
    This PowerPoint presentation will be available online for you to use. See the web addresses on the handout.
  • The job market has changed considerably from when we graduated from high school. Many of the careers our current students will have - have not even been thought of yet, which makes career preparation an even bigger challenge.
    We get most of our career guidance from our parents. Do our student's parents keep up with the rapidly changing job market?
  • What is D3M?
    The education system wants us to make decisions based on data, not a warm feeling. If we don’t have data to support the work we are doing, then we might just be wasting our time.
  • Advances in technology creates more skilled jobs and eliminates unskilled jobs.
  • http://stats.bls.gov/emp/optd/optd001.pdf
    Chapter I. Education and Training Classification Systems
    754 detailed occupations
    12.8% - high school degree or less, down from 13.2 percent in 2004.
    45.4% - high school/some college, down from 46.7 percent in 2004.
    12.4% - college degree or higher, up from 11.6 percent in 2004
  • Minimum education required for all jobs in NC projected to 2012.
    These are for all jobs that get a paycheck, not for contracted positions, or small business owners who do not write themselves a paycheck.
  • This is where our students say they are going after high school. Most say they are going to a four-year college.
  • Percentages are both # jobs projected in 2012, and #job openings each year from 2002 to 2012.
    Are we encouraging our students to get in education that will prepare them for a non-existent job?
  • What job in NC requires the most new workers projected through 2012?
    occupations with the most annual openings
    Which of these jobs require a 4-year degree?
    You’ll notice that many of these are in low skill jobs that have high turnover
    Notice the two classifications of nurses that have a high number of openings each year.
  • What job in USA requires the most new workers projected through 2012?
    occupations with the most annual openings
    Which of these jobs require a 4-year degree?
  • Jobs to stay away from.
    Mechanization has eliminated many of these jobs.
    Some have negative demand, meaning many will be laid off form these positions over the next few years. If you know anyone in these jobs, help them get back into school.
  • Jobs to stay away from.
    Mechanization has eliminated many of these jobs.
    Some have negative demand, meaning many will be laid off form these positions over the next few years. If you know anyone in these jobs, help them get back into school.
  • Has a four year degree, and has been mowing lawns for a year.
  • Many of our four-year graduates cannot find a job in their field.
  • Half of the students we are sending to four-year colleges are not graduating. And half of those who do graduate cannot find a job.
    National Center for Education statistics, U.S. Department of Education (nces.ed.gov)
    “Enrollment in Postsecondary Institutions, Fall 2004; Graduation Rates, 1998 & 2001 Cohorts; and Financial Statistics, Fiscal Year 2004”
    http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2006/2006155.pdf
  • Our university graduates are coming back to get the specific education they need for a job.
    I’m not saying that four-year degrees are not important… But for career purposes, (especially entry-level) it may not matter.
    It’s important to tell our students about life-long learning. Gone are the days where the first part of your life was learning and the rest of you life is doing. Now the learning and doing go together forever.
  • Community Colleges, not four-year colleges, are the key to educating the next generation of workers.
  • Our mission is to prepare our students for a career. It’s not enough to give them 12 years of reading, writing, and arithmetic.
    We have to look 5 to 10 years down the road to help our students plan their future. This means keeping up with the latest career trends, as well as teaching the students what it means to have a job.
  • This is the new version that will go to press as soon as I get some funds.
    Find a PDF copy online at www.nccareeroutlook.com
  • I gathered career data from the Employment Security Commission to show our students where the jobs will be when they graduate years from now.
    I found that this was an invaluable resource for our business volunteers. Most of them are too busy doing their jobs to look into the future as I have.
    We can spot the job trends and let the whole community know so they can predict where businesses, employees, and educators need to be years down the road.
    -Fastest Growing Occupations in North Carolina - (average annual growth rate in NC)
    Most Annual Openings in North Carolina - (total openings in NC each year)
    - Careers with the Most Annual Openings based on minimum educational requirements
  • Many good jobs can be had right out of high school. Many of these have room for advancement.
  • High demand jobs in NC that require a 2-year associate degree.
    Getting your foot in the door with one of these entry level jobs can lead to other jobs. Some employers will even pay for the education you need to advance.
    Look at all of the health professionals!
    Go to school for two years an start making some good money.
    All of these can relate to the Health industry.
    First-year teachers in Wake County make $29,673.80
    With a Master’s degree, that’s $32,790.20
    A teacher would have to work about 20 years to make that kind of money.
  • If you insist on getting a four-year degree, Education would be a safe bet.
    Unfortunately, more schooling does not always mean more money.
    A Dental Hygienist with only two years of education, makes more money the first year than many of these jobs that require 4-year degree.
  • And only half of those four-year degree graduates are finding a job in the area they just trained for.
  • After about 10 years of college, someone with a doctorate degree in education would start their career as a college professor at $xxx, which is a much lower starting salary than many of the jobs requiring a two year degree.
  • 2-year associate degree required
    What is the return on the investment in education?
    Look at all of the health professionals!
    Go to school for two years an start making some good money.
  • The majority of the Handbook is organized by career pathways.
    New this year is the Standard Occupation Classification codes.
  • North Carolina’s Career Pathways
    www.nccareeroutlook.com/career_pathways/
  • An example of the Health Sciences Career Pathway page.
    The blue jobs are in high demand
    Green jobs are moderate demand
    Red jobs are low or negative demand.
    There are lots of blue jobs in Health Sciences!
  • The top of the Industrial Technologies Career Pathway page.
    Lots of red careers due to mechanization of many repetitive industrial tasks.
    Camera repairers are in low demand since most cameras are disposable. It costs $100 just to get someone to diagnose your camera, so it’s better to just throw it away and buy another.
  • Why do we do this?
    This career data in the NC Career Outlook Handbook is invaluable for everyone!
  • The new Career Outlook Handbook is available as a PDF file on line. Not only that, the whole book has been made interactive.
    Find it at www.nccareeroutlook.com
    See the websites listed on your handout to get a copy, and to get a copy of this PowerPoint presentation.
  • Here is an example of the Commercial and Artistic Production Technologies Career Pathway web page. It’s the same chart in the printed version, with the same color codes. But if you click on the SOC code, it takes you to more information about that career.
    Let’s select the Audio and Video Equipment Technicians.
  • So where did all this data come from?
    It came from our NC Employment Security Commission. Unfortunately, they have so much data, which can make it hard to find exactly what you are looking for. And the data in the Career Outlook Handbook comes from several different data charts.
    Start by selecting the Labor Market Information.
  • First we will look at the wages in North Carolina
  • You can look at average wages by state, county, or a variety of other regional areas.
  • Select a major occupation group.
    Management Occupations
  • This breaks it down to the individual jobs and shows the estimated employment, and three sets of wages. You can change the display from hourly wages to annual wages.
  • And Planning Regions are another way to divide the state.
    Figure out where most of your students will be looking for jobs and find the geographic divisions that work best for you.
  • Now we turn to the Labor Market Projections.
  • Choose the entire state of a Workforce Development Board, which is usually a multi-county area.
  • The next chart shows the Employment by Occupational Group.
    Then by selecting an occupation group, like Architecture and Engineering Occupations,
  • You get down to the individual job level with statistics for 2002 employment, 2012 projected employment, and the annual change, which is where my color codes come from.
  • The next chart is the Annual Openings by Occupational Group.
    This shows a difference between the annual openings due to growth, or new jobs, and the number of job openings due to people retiring or leaving that job.
  • Fastest growing occupations by job growth.
    These are the occupations with the highest number of job openings over the 10-year period. These are the high-demand jobs.
    Notice that many of these charts allow you to export the data to Excel.
  • Next are the jobs to stay away from.
  • And this is the list of fastest growing occupations by percentage of growth. Some may not have high numbers of workers, but the percentage of those workers is growing fast.
  • Last we have the Occupational Employment and Average Job Needs.
    This shows the current employment, projected employment, annual change, and the average education required for each occupation.
    You can select an Occupation Group
  • There is a lot more data at the Employment Security Commission. Take some time to look around.
    Employment Commission, Workforce Commission, etc.
  • www.projectionscentral.com/
  • www.projectionscentral.com/projections.asp
  • Another way to look at careers is to look at which occupations are esteemed by society. Should this make a difference in our career choice. For some it might matter.
  • Our mission is to help our students find the right career. It’s not enough to just give them 12 years of reading, writing, and arithmetic.
    We have to look 5 to 10 years down the road to help our students plan their future. This means keeping up with the latest career trends, as well as teaching the students what it means to have a job.
    Get them to look at the growing industries, which have jobs that are in high demand.
    Look at the return on the investment of education verses wages.
    Look for jobs that have a pathway to higher jobs.
    We need to get past the generation of employees who do not like their jobs and only go to work to earn the money to support their hobbies and interests. Wouldn’t it be nice if people could get paid to do the thing they are most passionate about? With our guidance they can.
  • What’s our attitude towards work?
    Are you working for the weekend?
    How do you feel about Mondays?
  • Have you ever know anyone more passionate about their job (than Steve Irwin)? Wouldn’t it be great if our kids could all find a career that they are passionate about? Not just a job that pays for their weekend activities, but a job that gives them a sense of purpose? What if that sense of purpose led to a thirst for knowledge? A desire for life-long education. A desire to share that passion with others.
  • Getting and Using Current Career Data to Help Students ...

    1. 1. Getting and Using CurrentGetting and Using Current Career Data to Help StudentsCareer Data to Help Students Prepare for Careers that willPrepare for Careers that will be in Demand whenbe in Demand when they Graduatethey Graduate Chris DroesslerChris Droessler School-to-Career CoordinatorSchool-to-Career Coordinator Wake County Public School SystemWake County Public School System Raleigh, North CarolinaRaleigh, North Carolina
    2. 2. If we really want to prepareIf we really want to prepare our students for successfulour students for successful careers, we need to know allcareers, we need to know all we can about the rapidlywe can about the rapidly changing job market.changing job market. C DroesslerC Droessler
    3. 3. DD33 MM Making decisions based on real data,Making decisions based on real data, -- not -not - “because we’ve always done it that way.”“because we’ve always done it that way.” Data-Driven Decision MakingData-Driven Decision Making
    4. 4. This slide was removed after the presentationThis slide was removed after the presentation was made and replaced with the followingwas made and replaced with the following slide. Apparently many scholars are quotingslide. Apparently many scholars are quoting these same data charts from the same badthese same data charts from the same bad source.source. If you see three pie charts comparingIf you see three pie charts comparing unskilledunskilled,, skilledskilled, and, and professionalprofessional laborlabor changes from 1950 to 1991 to 2000, bechanges from 1950 to 1991 to 2000, be suspect. The data source might be listed assuspect. The data source might be listed as the Department of Labor or the Bureau ofthe Department of Labor or the Bureau of Labor Statistics.Labor Statistics. Data have apparently never been kept byData have apparently never been kept by those agencies using these categories.those agencies using these categories.
    5. 5. Jobs in 2014 (USA)Jobs in 2014 (USA) U.S. Department of Labor - Bureau of Labor Statistics http://stats.bls.gov/emp/optd/optd001.pdf high schoolhigh school degree or lessdegree or less high school/high school/ some collegesome college college degreecollege degree or higheror higher 12.8%12.8% 45.4%45.4% 12.4%12.4%
    6. 6. Bachelor’s degree Bachelor + work exp. Master’s degree Doctorate degree Professional 1,2 year college Associate degree short OJT mod. OJT long OJT work exp. 2012 Projected NC Employment:2012 Projected NC Employment: Education RequiredEducation Required NC Employment Security Commission
    7. 7. 2004 NC High School Graduate Intentions2004 NC High School Graduate Intentions Public SeniorPublic Senior InstitutionsInstitutions Private SeniorPrivate Senior InstitutionsInstitutions Community and Technical Colleges Private Junior Colleges Trade and Business Schools Military Employment Other NC Public Schools Statistical Profile 2005
    8. 8. Postsecondary Intentions vs. RealityPostsecondary Intentions vs. Reality Graduate IntentionsGraduate Intentions Education RequiredEducation Required 4 year 4 year 1-2 year 1-2 year OJT OJT 47.4% 35.9% 13% 9% 63.8% 19%
    9. 9. Fastest Growing Occup. in NCFastest Growing Occup. in NC (Total New Positions Projected from 2002 - 2012)(Total New Positions Projected from 2002 - 2012) 23,10023,100 Registered NursesRegistered Nurses 22,04022,040 CashiersCashiers 21,60021,600 Retail SalespersonsRetail Salespersons 17,29017,290 Waiters and WaitressesWaiters and Waitresses 16,62016,620 Combined Food Preparation and Serving WorkersCombined Food Preparation and Serving Workers 14,64014,640 Nursing Aides, Orderlies, and AttendantsNursing Aides, Orderlies, and Attendants 14,22014,220 Truck Drivers, Heavy and Tractor-TrailerTruck Drivers, Heavy and Tractor-Trailer 13,98013,980 Customer Service RepresentativesCustomer Service Representatives 13,04013,040 General and Operations ManagersGeneral and Operations Managers 12,31012,310 Janitors and Cleaners, Except MaidsJanitors and Cleaners, Except Maids 10,78010,780 First-line Supervisors/Managers - Retail SalesFirst-line Supervisors/Managers - Retail Sales 10,17010,170 Home Health AidesHome Health Aides 9,030 Office Clerks, General
    10. 10. Fastest Growing Occup. in USAFastest Growing Occup. in USA (Total New Positions Projected from 2002 - 2012)(Total New Positions Projected from 2002 - 2012) 623,510623,510 Registered NursesRegistered Nurses 602,600602,600 Postsecondary TeachersPostsecondary Teachers 598,910598,910 Retail SalespersonsRetail Salespersons 460,250460,250 Customer Service RepresentativesCustomer Service Representatives 454,320454,320 Combined Food Preparation and Serving WorkersCombined Food Preparation and Serving Workers 454,270454,270 CashiersCashiers 410,570410,570 Janitors and Cleaners, Except MaidsJanitors and Cleaners, Except Maids 376,030376,030 General and Operations ManagersGeneral and Operations Managers 367,390367,390 Waiters and WaitressesWaiters and Waitresses 343,000343,000 Nursing Aides, Orderlies, and AttendantsNursing Aides, Orderlies, and Attendants 337,600337,600 Truck Drivers, Heavy and Tractor-TrailerTruck Drivers, Heavy and Tractor-Trailer 324,650324,650 Receptionists and Information ClerksReceptionists and Information Clerks 317,690 Security Guards www.projectionscentral.com/
    11. 11. Fastest Declining Occup. in NCFastest Declining Occup. in NC (Total New Positions Projected from 2002 - 2012)(Total New Positions Projected from 2002 - 2012) -11,860 Farmers and Ranchers -7,280 Textile Winding, Twisting, Machine Setters, Operators -6,200 Sewing Machine Operators -5,280 Textile Knitting / Weaving Machine Setters, Operators -2,580 Textile Bleaching & Dyeing Machine Operators -2,280 Textile, Apparel, & Furnishings Workers, all other -1,560 Industrial Machinery Mechanics -1,460 Inspectors, Testers, Sorters, Samplers & Weighers -1,100 Farm, Ranch, and Other Agricultural Managers -990 Upholsterers -970 Order Clerks -970 Textile Cutting Machine Setters, Operators, Tenders -900 Helpers--Production Workers -810 Farming, Fishing, and Forestry Workers, all other
    12. 12. Fastest Declining Occup. in USAFastest Declining Occup. in USA (Total New Positions Projected from 2002 - 2012)(Total New Positions Projected from 2002 - 2012) -207,570 Farmers and Ranchers -98,950 Sewing Machine Operators -89,920 Word Processors and Typists -68,060 Stock Clerks and Order Filers -56,530 Secretaries, except Legal, Medical, and Executive -51,310 Electrical and Electronic Equipment Assemblers -30,420 Computer Operators -27,980 Telephone Operators -26,420 Postal Service Mail Sorters, Processors -23,340 Loan Interviewers and Clerks -21,310 Data Entry Keyers -21,090 Telemarketers -20,440 Textile Knitting & Weaving Mach. Setters, Operators -19,850 Textile Winding, Twisting, Drawing Out Mach. Setters www.projectionscentral.com/
    13. 13. 56% of bachelor’s-seeking students get degree in 6 years (35% in 4 years) National Center for Education Statistics, U.S. Department of Education (nces.ed.gov)
    14. 14. It makes you think?It makes you think? What happens to ourWhat happens to our 4-year program dropouts?4-year program dropouts? Did we send them toDid we send them to the wrong school?the wrong school? 25% of all students at25% of all students at Wake Tech Community CollegeWake Tech Community College have a 4-year degree.have a 4-year degree.
    15. 15. ““We need to foster aWe need to foster a flexible educationflexible education systemsystem--one that--one that integrates work andintegrates work and trainingtraining and that serves the needs both ofand that serves the needs both of experienced workers at different stages inexperienced workers at different stages in their careers and oftheir careers and of students embarkingstudents embarking onon their initial course of study.their initial course of study. CommunityCommunity collegescolleges, for example, have become, for example, have become important providers of job skills trainingimportant providers of job skills training notnot just for students who may eventually movejust for students who may eventually move on to a four-year college or university but foron to a four-year college or university but for individuals with jobs--particularly olderindividuals with jobs--particularly older workers seeking to retool or retrain.”workers seeking to retool or retrain.” Alan Greenspan,Alan Greenspan, Chairman, Federal ReserveChairman, Federal Reserve April 11th, 2000April 11th, 2000
    16. 16. Jobs for Everyone!Jobs for Everyone! What we look for in our crystal ball:What we look for in our crystal ball: •• Fastest growing occupationsFastest growing occupations •• Most annual openingsMost annual openings •• High demand occupationsHigh demand occupations •• Education requiredEducation required •• Jobs with potential for advancementJobs with potential for advancement •• Future-proof occupationsFuture-proof occupations
    17. 17. Career Outlook Handbo ok
    18. 18. NC Career Outlook HandbookNC Career Outlook Handbook • Fastest growing occupations in North CarolinaFastest growing occupations in North Carolina • Most annual openings in North CarolinaMost annual openings in North Carolina • Most annual openings based on minimumMost annual openings based on minimum educational requirements:educational requirements: • Vocational degreeVocational degree • Associate degreeAssociate degree • Bachelor degreeBachelor degree • High demand listed by:High demand listed by: • Education requirementsEducation requirements • Starting salariesStarting salaries
    19. 19. On the Job Training RequiredOn the Job Training Required (2002 NC Starting Salaries - 2012 High Demand)(2002 NC Starting Salaries - 2012 High Demand) $25,830 mod. OJT Cargo and Freight Agents $25,420 mod. OJT Sales Representatives, Services, all other $23,100 mod. OJT Truck Drivers, Heavy and Tractor-Trailer $22,970 long OJT Recreational Vehicle Service Technicians $22,790 mod. OJT Dental Assistants $22,730 long OJT HVACR Mechanics and Installers $22,500 short OJT Sailors and Marine Oilers $22,490 long OJT Telecom. Line Installers and Repairers $22,490 long OJT Welders, Cutters, Solderers, and Brazers $22,460 mod. OJT Drywall and Ceiling Tile Installers $22,400 long OJT Reinforcing Iron and Rebar Workers $22,300 long OJT Audio and Video Equipment Technicians $22,230 mod. OJT Tapers $21,630 long OJT Motorcycle Mechanics
    20. 20. Associate Degree RequiredAssociate Degree Required (2002 NC Starting Salaries - 2012 High Demand)(2002 NC Starting Salaries - 2012 High Demand) $46,110 Nuclear Medicine Technologists $45,430 Dental Hygienists $44,030 Radiation Therapists $42,840 Diagnostic Medical Sonographers $38,860 Registered Nurses $38,180 Computer Specialists, all other $35,050 Respiratory Therapists $34,030 Radiologic Technologists and Technicians $32,850 Electro-Mechanical Technicians $31,310 Physical Therapist Assistants $27,650 Computer Support Specialists $27,290 Occupational Therapist Assistants $26,830 Biological Technicians
    21. 21. Bachelor Degree RequiredBachelor Degree Required (2002 NC Starting Salaries - 2012 High Demand)(2002 NC Starting Salaries - 2012 High Demand) $55,520 Computer Software Engineers, Systems $53,920 Physician Assistants $50,810 Computer Software Engineers, Applications $47,550 Health Diagnosing & Treating Practitioners $46,110 Biomedical Engineers $44,780 Environmental Engineers $44,750 Computer Systems Analysts $44,080 Occupational Therapists $41,770 Network Systems & Data Comm. Analysts $41,540 Network & Computer Systems Administrators $40,720 Sales Engineers $39,800 Social Workers, all other $39,310 Logisticians
    22. 22. Doctorate Degree RequiredDoctorate Degree Required (2002 NC Starting Salaries - 2012 High Demand)(2002 NC Starting Salaries - 2012 High Demand) $52,770 Physicists $48,300 Medical Scientists, except Epidemiologists $25,650-$47,070 College/University Professor $38,012 College/University Professor (average)
    23. 23. Associate Degree RequiredAssociate Degree Required (2002 NC Starting Salaries - 2012 High Demand)(2002 NC Starting Salaries - 2012 High Demand) $46,110 Nuclear Medicine Technologists $45,430 Dental Hygienists $44,030 Radiation Therapists $42,840 Diagnostic Medical Sonographers $38,860 Registered Nurses $38,180 Computer Specialists, all other $35,050 Respiratory Therapists $34,030 Radiologic Technologists and Technicians $32,850 Electro-Mechanical Technicians $31,310 Physical Therapist Assistants $27,650 Computer Support Specialists $27,290 Occupational Therapist Assistants $26,830 Biological Technicians
    24. 24. NC Career Pathway ChartsNC Career Pathway Charts Careers organized by 11 NC Career PathwaysCareers organized by 11 NC Career Pathways • Minimum education requiredMinimum education required • Number of workers in NCNumber of workers in NC • Average starting salaryAverage starting salary • Average salaryAverage salary • Growth outlookGrowth outlook • SOC codesSOC codes
    25. 25. NC Career PathwaysNC Career Pathways Agricultural and Natural Resources TechnologiesAgricultural and Natural Resources Technologies Arts and SciencesArts and Sciences Biological and Chemical TechnologiesBiological and Chemical Technologies Business TechnologiesBusiness Technologies Commercial and Artistic Production TechnologiesCommercial and Artistic Production Technologies Construction TechnologiesConstruction Technologies Engineering TechnologiesEngineering Technologies Health SciencesHealth Sciences Industrial TechnologiesIndustrial Technologies Public Service TechnologiesPublic Service Technologies Transport Systems TechnologiesTransport Systems Technologies
    26. 26. Why?Why? • StudentsStudents - Learn which careers will have openings- Learn which careers will have openings when they are ready to join the workforce.when they are ready to join the workforce. • ParentsParents - Help their children decide which career to- Help their children decide which career to pursue.pursue. • TeachersTeachers - Know which careers are in high demand- Know which careers are in high demand so they can relate their teachings to careers.so they can relate their teachings to careers. (Relevance)(Relevance) • BusinessesBusinesses - Give business people the data they- Give business people the data they need to discuss careers with our students.need to discuss careers with our students. (Relationships)(Relationships) Milwaukee Room @ 3:15 TodayMilwaukee Room @ 3:15 Today
    27. 27. www.www.nnccccareerareerooutlook.comutlook.com
    28. 28. www.projectionscentral.com/
    29. 29. Our MissionOur Mission Help our students find the right career:Help our students find the right career: • High demand occupations in growingHigh demand occupations in growing industriesindustries • ROI - Education vs. SalaryROI - Education vs. Salary • Jobs with potential for advancementJobs with potential for advancement • Future-proof occupationsFuture-proof occupations • Transferable skillsTransferable skills • Job satisfactionJob satisfaction
    30. 30. Everybody’s Working For The Weekend (Loverboy) Take This Job And Shove It (Johnny Paycheck) Rainy Days And Mondays Always Get Me Down (Carpenters) I Don’t Like Mondays (Boomtown Rats) Don’t Talk To Me About Work (Lou Reed ) The Work Song (Billy Squier) Goin’ To Work (Martina McBride ) Off To Work (Chicago) I’ve Been Working On The Railroad (John Denver) I Don’t Wanna Work That Hard (Blaine Larsen) Seven Day Weekend (Abc) The Weekend Song (Alanis Morissette) Living For The Weekend (Hard-Fi)
    31. 31. Passion and PurposePassion and Purpose
    32. 32. Thanks for coming!Thanks for coming! www.wcpss.net/school_to_career

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