Fri.01.Stiles.ppt

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  • <number>
  • This doesn’t include national laboratories, universities, hospitals, government facilities, etc.
  • !
  • And companies are preparing license applications for more than 30 new nuclear power plants in this country alone—more around the world.
    Tremendous opportunities
  • .
  • Fri.01.Stiles.ppt

    1. 1. Careers in Nuclear Science and Technology Lisa Stiles Dominion Resources Services Project Leader – Strategic Staffing and Knowledge Management
    2. 2. Overview • A Career Roadtrip • Major Fields • More opportunities • What We Need from You • Resources
    3. 3. My Career Roadtrip
    4. 4. Major Fields • Commercial Power • Nuclear Navy • Nuclear Medicine • Research
    5. 5. Commercial Power
    6. 6. Commercial Power 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 18-22 23-27 28-32 33-37 38-42 43-47 48-52 53-57 58-62 63-67 67+ Age Range Employees 2003 2005 2007 Source: 2007 NEI Pipeline Survey Preliminary Results
    7. 7. Commercial Power • Up to 15,600 nuclear utility workers may be eligible for retirement in the next 5 years • Vendors, suppliers, government agencies are in the same boat! • And that’s just to keep the current fleet running • What does that mean to your students?
    8. 8. Salary Examples Nuclear Engineer I $62,000 Radiation Protection technician $36,000 (entry level) Radiation Protection technician $41,000 (step 2) Reactor Operator Trainee $37,000 Licensed Reactor Operator $64,000
    9. 9. Commercial Power • Engineers – nuclear, electrical, chemical, mechanical, materials, and civil/structural • Professionals – health physicists, RP technicians, chemists, accountants, instrumentation and control technicians, IT experts, business management, fire protection, industrial safety, security and training instructors • Skilled Trades – electricians, welders, mechanics, pipe fitters, machinists, carpenters, millwrights and heavy equipment operators.
    10. 10. Just a Few Examples • Core designers – Model the neutronic characteristics – Predict how the core will react to various operating conditions. – Optimize the parameters to safely produce electricity.
    11. 11. Just a few examples • Spent fuel management – Evaluate fuel for dry storage – Design dry storage facilities – Design and test dry storage cask designs to withstand: • Tornado winds and missiles • Earthquake • Drop • Tipover • Cold weather • Fire
    12. 12. Just a few examples • Health Physicists and technicians – Protect personnel – Protect the facility – Protect the public – Protect the environment
    13. 13. Just a few examples • Operators – Operate the equipment • Turn the valves • Read the instruments • Push the buttons and the switches – Make the megawatts! – Trained to predict, understand and respond
    14. 14. Pathways • High school→trainee • Skilled craft apprenticeship with labor union • Professional Certificate or Associate’s Degree at Technical School or Community College • Bachelor’s (or higher) degree • Navy Nuclear experience
    15. 15. High school→trainee • Usually requires pre-employment testing. Details and links to example tests at http://www.dom.com/jobs/tests.jsp#admin_support • Good math and science skills (passed Algebra 2 plus one of Physics, Chemistry, or Biology) • Pros – Immediate employment (with benefits) and on-the-job training • Cons – On-the-job training will generally take longer to get to “certificate” status – Usually will not receive credit towards a degree
    16. 16. Skilled Craft Apprenticeship • Usually requires passing an assessment test (good math and science skills plus mechanical aptitude) • Defined pay, benefits and advancement structure
    17. 17. Skilled Craft Apprenticeship • Apply with local union boards where applicable – IBEW at www.ibew.org – Utility Workers Union, http://uwua.net/ – Others include AFL-CIO Building and Construction Trades, Metal Trades, Sheet Metal Workers International Association, United Association of Journeymen and Apprentices of the Plumbing and Pipe Fitting Industry
    18. 18. Certificate or AAS Degree • Typically 2-year programs • Good math and science skills (Passed Algebra 2 plus one of Physics, Chemistry or Biology) • Credits usually transferable toward a 4- year degree • After completion, may choose to enter workforce or continue for a bachelor’s degree
    19. 19. Certificate or AAS Degree • Increasing opportunities for scholarships and paid internships • Examples – Linn State Technical College http://www.atc.org/atc04.htm – Central Virginia Community College http://www.cv.cc.va.us/Workforce/NSF/default.asp – Three Rivers Community College http://www.universities.com/On- Campus/Three_Rivers_Community_College__Norwich _CT_Associate_degree_Nuclear__Nuclear_Power_Tec hnology__T_165507.html
    20. 20. Engineering degree • Nuclear, electrical, chemical, mechanical, materials, and civil/structural • Nuclear and health physics programs at http:// www.nei.org/index.asp?catnum =2&catid=289
    21. 21. Engineering Degree • Scholarships, Fellowships, and Internships at http://www.nei.org/inde x.asp? catnum=2&catid=210 • At least Trigonometry (Calculus preferred) plus Chemistry and/or Physics
    22. 22. Nuclear Navy • Highly selective program for both officers and enlisted personnel – Sophomore year in college can enter the Nuclear Propulsion Officer Candidate Program (NUPOC). Monthly stipend of $2,600-$4,100 and a $15,000 selection bonus • Rigorous training – 6 months at Nuclear Power School – 6 months at Nuclear Prototype School
    23. 23. Nuclear Navy • HUGE retention bonuses ($75,000!) • Many skills translate directly to the commercial industry • http://www.navy.com/
    24. 24. Nuclear Medicine • Physician – Medical School plus at least 3 years training • Technologist – Wide variety of positions – 4-year degree, Post-BS Certificate (1 year training), 2-year Associates Degree
    25. 25. Nuclear Medicine • Pharmacist – 4-year degree plus specialized nuclear training – Average about $85,000 • Physicist – Advanced degree required (usually physics, medical physics, biophysics, computer engineering, electrical engineering or biomedical engineering)
    26. 26. Research and Academia • Increase in funding for research in nuclear science & technology – DOE – GNEP – NASA • New and exciting applications of nuclear science and technology
    27. 27. Research and Academia • New reactor designs • Fission research • Fusion • Recycling and transmutation • Advances in nuclear medicine • Space technology
    28. 28. Other Opportunities • Space Technology • Environmental Applications • Industrial Applications
    29. 29. What We Need from You • Tell us how we can help you get students excited about math, science and technical careers in general and Nuclear in particular! • Tell your students about the plentiful and diverse opportunities for exciting, rewarding and well-paying careers in nuclear science and technology
    30. 30. What We Need from You • Tell your interested students to – Do well in school (and stay out of trouble) – Take math and science • Algebra 2 plus one of Physics, Chemistry, or Biology for technician trainees • Trigonometry (Calculus preferred) plus at least 3 years of science for engineering students – Consider summer opportunities like the University of Missouri-Rolla Nuclear Engineering summer camp for rising high school juniors and seniors
    31. 31. University of Missouri-Rolla Nuclear Engineering Summer Camp ANS-VA Section Scholarships
    32. 32. More Resources • Center for Energy Workforce Development (CEWD) – www.cewd.org – Get Into Energy website for students • Includes career assessment, descriptions of jobs, interactive portions • http://www.cewd.org/ • Nuclear Energy Institute – Home page www.nei.org – Career Center http://www.nei.org/index.asp?catnum=1&catid=7 – Blog http://neinuclearnotes.blogspot.com/ – Carol Berrigan at 202.739.8050
    33. 33. More Resources • American Nuclear Society – Home page www.ans.org – Career Center http://www.ans.org/pi/edu/students/careers/ • Health Physics Society – Home page www.hps.org – Career Center http:// www.hps.org/publicinformation/hpcareers.html • Society of Nuclear Medicine – http://www.snm.org • North American Young Generation in Nuclear – www.na-ygn.org
    34. 34. Questions?

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