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DoE (William Valdez)

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DoE (William Valdez)

  1. 1. New and Emerging Federal Funding Opportunities-- The Office of Science (SC) at the US Department of Energy Bill Valdez Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy bill.valdez@science.doe.gov 2006 ASEE Engineering Research Council February 28, 2006
  2. 2. DOE Mission Areas Environmental Quality - To Repair the Environmental Consequences of the Cold War Energy Resources - To Foster a Secure and Reliable National Energy Supply National Security - To Maintain the Safety and Reliability of the Nuclear Stockpile Science...
  3. 3. (1) Source: FY 2007 Budget of the United States, Analytical Perspectives volume, R&D Chapter Federal Research Funding Rankings Federal R&D Budget -- FY 2007 Data (1) (dollars in millions) Crosscut Crosscut Crosscut Basic Research Applied Research Development Facilities/ Equipment Total R&D Networking And Info. Technology R&D National Nanotechnology Initiative Climate Change Science Program 1 HHS 16,037 HHS 12.540 DOD 68,315 NASA 2,146 DOD 74,234 DOD 1,018 NSF 373 NASA 1,025 2 NSF 3,687 DOD 4,478 NASA 6,755 DOE 1,130 HHS 28,737 NSF 904 DOD 345 NSF 205 3 DOE 3,315 DOE 2,723 DOE 1,990 NSF 482 NASA 12,245 HHS 541 DOE 258 COMMERCE 186 4 NASA 2,226 NASA 1,118 DHS 335 DHS 181 DOE 9,158 DOE 473 HHS 173 DOE 126 5 DOD 1,422 AGRIC. 974 TRANSP. 194 HHS 123 NSF 4,548 NASA 82 COMMERCE 86 AGRIC. 61
  4. 4. Office of Science (SC)  Supports basic research that underpins DOE missions. • Provides over 40% of federal support to the physical sciences (including more than 90% of high energy and nuclear physics) • Provides sole support to select sub-fields (e.g. nuclear medicine, heavy element chemistry, magnetic fusion, etc.) • Supports the research of 15,000 PhDs and graduate students  Constructs and operates large scientific facilities for the U.S. scientific community. • Accelerators, synchrotron light sources, neutron sources, etc. • Used by about 18,000 researchers every year  Provides infrastructure support for the ten SC laboratories.
  5. 5. • Future of Science – The Department of Energy’s Office of Science is the steward of national science facilities that maintain U.S. world-leadership status in the physical sciences – Understand Key Questions: the beginning of time, the nature of energy and matter from quarks to the cosmos – Develop Scientific Workforce: Using the unique capabilities of the DOE laboratories for teacher professional development; enhancing the size and diversity of the scientific workforce • Competitiveness – Keeping U.S. Research and Development at the forefront of global science – Scientific Computation – accelerate innovation through virtual prototypes – Nanotechnology centers provide a unique capability for US universities and industry • Energy Security – Develop new sources of energy through transformational technologies, e.g., fusion and novel methods of converting biomass to ethanol – Develop stronger, lightweight materials and improve combustion and catalytic processes to reduce energy consumption and improve efficiency Office of Science Missions
  6. 6. SC Research Areas BES - Basic Energy Sciences Materials Sciences and Engineering •Experimental Condensed Matter Physics •Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics •X-Ray and Neutron Scattering •Materials Chemistry and Biomolecular Materials •Structure and Composition of Materials •Mechanical Behavior and Radiation Effects •Physical Behavior of Materials •Synthesis and Processing Science •Engineering Physics Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences •Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Science •Chemical Physics Research •Photochemistry and Radiation Research •Catalysis and Chemical Transformations •Separations and Analysis •Heavy Element Chemistry •Chemical Energy and Chemical Engineering •Geosciences Research •Energy Biosciences Research Scientific User Facilities •X-Ray and Neutron Scattering Facilities •Nanoscience Centers ASCR – Advanced Scientific Computing Research •Mathematical, Information and Computational Sciences •Applied and Computational Mathematics •High-End Computer Science Research •Computational Software Tools •Collaborative Software Tools for Science •High-Performance Computing Facilities •Large-Scale Science Networks HEP - High Energy Physics •Experimental HEP •Theoretical HEP •Accelerator Physics and Technology •Accelerator Theory •Detector Development •Quantum ChromoDynamics (QCD) •New Particle Searches •Higgs Physics •Fundamental Forces and Unification •Rare Decays and Phenomena •Electroweak Physics •Quark Flavor Physics and CP Violation •Cosmology •Neutrino Physics •Particle Astrophysics •Dark Matter Searches •Dark Energy NP – Nuclear Physics •Structure of the nucleon •Nuclear Structure •Nuclear Astrophysics •Fundamental interactions with cold neutrons •Fundamental interactions with neutrinos •Hot dense nuclear matter •Nuclear theory •Advanced instrumentation and accelerator R&D FES - Fusion Energy Sciences Fusion Sciences •Advanced Fusion Designs •Plasma Physics and Plasma Science •Plasma Confinement Configuration Optimization •High Energy Density Physics •Enabling Plasma Technology •Burning Plasma Physics BER – Biological & Environmental Research Life Sciences •Microbial Systems Biology (Genomics: GTL) •Low Dose Radiation Research •High Throughput DNA Sequencing •Functional Genomics •Human Subjects in Research •Structural Biology Facilities Medical Sciences •Molecular Radiopharmaceutical Development •Molecular Nuclear Medical Imaging •Imaging Gene Expression •Artificial Retina •Biomedical Engineering Climate Change Sciences •Decade to Century Climate Modeling •Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) •Atmospheric Science •Carbon Cycle Research •Ocean Sciences •Terrestrial Carbon Processes •Ecosystem Function and Response •Information & Integration •Integrated Assessment of Climate Change Environmental Remediation Sciences •Contaminant Fate & Transport •In Situ Remediation Research •Radioactive Waste Treatment Research •Characterization & Performance Monitoring •Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab
  7. 7. SC Laboratories, User Facilities, and the Institutions that Use Them Pacific NorthwestPacific Northwest National LaboratoryNational Laboratory AmesAmes LaboratoryLaboratory ArgonneArgonne NationalNational LaboratoryLaboratory BrookhavenBrookhaven NationalNational LaboratoryLaboratory Oak RidgeOak Ridge NationalNational LaboratoryLaboratoryLos Alamos National Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory LawrenceLawrence BerkeleyBerkeley NationalNational LaboratoryLaboratory Sandia National Laboratories FermiFermi NationalNational AcceleratorAccelerator LaboratoryLaboratory PrincetonPrinceton PlasmaPlasma PhysicsPhysics LaboratoryLaboratory Thomas JeffersonThomas Jefferson National AcceleratorNational Accelerator FacilityFacility National Renewable Energy Laboratory StanfordStanford LinearLinear AcceleratorAccelerator CenterCenter Idaho National Environmental & Engineering Laboratory National Energy Technology Laboratory General Atomics SC Supported Research Institution (Universities, Colleges, Medical Centers) User Facilities SC Multiprogram Laboratory SC Program Dedicated Laboratory Other DOE Laboratory
  8. 8. SC makes long-term investments Office of Science Strategic Plan 20-Year Facilities Outlook DOE Strategic Plan
  9. 9. SC Investment in the Future • Advance the Basic Sciences for Energy Independence • Harness the Power of Our Living World • Bring the Power of the Stars on Earth • Explore the Fundamental Interactions of Energy, Matter, Time, and Space • Explore Nuclear Matter-From Quarks to Stars • Deliver Computing for the Frontiers of Science • Provide the Resource Foundations that Enable Great Science SC set seven long-term (20-year) goals for our programs:
  10. 10. 20-year Facilities Outlook Public Prioritizations Builds Consensus that Builds Facilities CD0 ORNL LCC – CD4 CD3 CD0 CD1 Working with NASA on Joint Project CD0 CD0 Phase one underway CD0 Indicates Department Approval of Any of the Following Stages (stage is current status) CD0 – Mission Need Approval CD1 – Approval of Alternative Selection and Cost Range CD2 – Approval of Technical, Cost, and Schedule Baselines CD3 – Approval to Start Construction CD4 – Approval for Start of Operations
  11. 11. Competitively Selected, Peer Reviewed Basic Research SC $3.6 B (FY06) NSF $5.6 B (FY06) mission-drivenproposal-driven SC Programs • ASCR • BER • BES • FES • HEP • NP NSF Directorates • Biological Sciences (BIO) • Computer & Information Science & Engineering (CISE) • Education and Human Resources (EHR) • Engineering (ENG) • Geosciences (GEO) • Mathematical & Physical Sciences (MPS) • Social, Behavioral & Economic Sciences (SBE)
  12. 12. Joint Efforts with NSF • National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (ASCR) • NSF/DOE Partnership in Basic Plasma Science and Engineering (FES) • EPSCoR (started by NSF and led to creation of DOE/EPSCoR) • DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NP) • High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEP) • Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee (also NASA) (HEP) • Climate Change Research (Also NOAA, NASA, UDSA, Interior & EPA) (BER) • Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (Jointly funded by BER and NSF) • Joint Genome Institute (also NIH, USDA, NASA) (BES, BER) • Arabidopsis Genome Initiative (2010 Project) (also USDA, the EU, and the Chiba Prefectural Government of Japan) (BER) • Maize Genome Sequencing Project (also USDA) (BER) • The IT2 Initiative (terascale computing) (ASCR) • Summer Undergraduate Laboratory Internships (SULI) (WDTS) • Faculty–Student Teams (FaST) (WDTS) • Pre-Service Teacher (PST) Internships (WDTS)
  13. 13. Office of Science Budget Universities Receive One Third of Research Funds and Provide Half of the Users at SC Facilities The area of each pie chart is proportional to the funding total for the year. * All Other Research includes funding for non-profits, other federal agencies, and private institutions. FY 2007 Request, $4,102 Million Research $1,869M Program Direction $171M User Facilities $1,808M Other CE/GPP/GPE $183M Safeguards and Security $71M Universities & Colleges $611M National Laboratories $1,058M All Other Research* $200M Facility Operations $1,418M Facility PACE/AIP/GPP $390M FY 2006 Appropriation, $3,596 Million Research $1,632M Congressionally- directed Projects $129M User Facilities $1,462M Other CE/GPP/GEP $146M Safeguards and Security $68M Program Direction $159M Universities & Colleges $502M National Laboratories $940M Facility Operations $1,158M Facility PACE/AIP/GPP $304M All Other Research* $190M
  14. 14. Office of Science FY07 Congressional Budget Request (dollars in thousands) FY 2005 Approp. FY 2006 Approp. FY 2007 President's Request FY 2007 vs. FY 2006 Basic Energy Sciences………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………1,083,616 1,134,557 1,420,980 +286,423 Advanced Scientific Computing Research………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………226,180 234,684 318,654 +83,970 Biological and Environmental Research Base program………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………487,474 451,131 510,263 +59,132 Congressionally-directed projects………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………79,123 128,700 —— -128,700 Total, Biological and Environmental Research…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………566,597 579,831 510,263 -69,568 High Energy Physics…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………722,906 716,694 775,099 +58,405 Nuclear Physics………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………394,549 367,034 454,060 +87,026 Fusion Energy Sciences……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………266,947 287,644 318,950 +31,306 Science Laboratories Infrastructure………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………37,498 41,684 50,888 +9,204 Science Program Direction…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………154,031 159,118 170,877 +11,759 Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………7,599 7,120 10,952 +3,832 Small Business Innovation Research/Technology Transfer……………………………………………………………………………………………………………113,621 —— —— —— Safeguards and Security……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………67,168 68,025 70,987 +2,962 Subtotal, Science…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………3,640,712 3,596,391 4,101,710 +505,319 Use of prior year balances…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………-5,062 —— —— —— Total, Science………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………3,635,650 3,596,391 4,101,710 +505,319* ______________________ * One half of the $505 million increase is for operations of our scientific facilities, including operations at new facilities: the Spallation Neutron Source and the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences at Oak Ridge; the Center for Nanoscale Materials at Argonne; the Molecular Foundry at Berkeley; and the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies at Sandia and Los Alamos National Laboratories. Research is increased by $237 million, 47% of the $505 million increase.
  15. 15. The President’s American Competitiveness Initiative “We must continue to lead the world in human talent and creativity. Our greatest advantage in the world has always been our educated, hardworking, ambitious people -- and we're going to keep that edge. Tonight I announce an American Competitiveness Initiative, to encourage innovation throughout our economy, and to give our nation's children a firm grounding in math and science.” “I propose to double the federal commitment to the most critical basic research programs in the physical sciences over the next 10 years. This funding will support the work of America's most creative minds as they explore promising areas such as nanotechnology, supercomputing, and alternative energy sources.” President George W. Bush State of the Union Message January 31, 2006
  16. 16. The President’s FY07 budget is a 14.1% increase for the Office of Science – on path to double by 2016 An historic opportunity for our country – a renaissance for U.S. science and continued global competitiveness. Office of Science Budget Doubling from FY 2006 to FY 2016 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 Fiscal Year BudgetAuthority AsSpentDollarsinBillions FY1995 level plus inflation SC budget doubles to $7.2B in FY2016 from $3.6B in FY2006
  17. 17. • SC facilities and instruments ensure for the U.S. an order of magnitude dominance in key scientific fields that will transform the 21st-century global economy: biotechnology, nanotechnology, materials science, and high-speed computing • SC develops and nurtures a highly trained scientific workforce for the civilian economy and national security, with many Ph.D.’s entering industry and government • Supports DOE energy mission through long-term, high-risk, high-payoff multidisciplinary research programs • Provides 42% of federal support to the physical sciences • We are stewards for high energy physics, nuclear physics, heavy element chemistry, plasma physics, magnetic fusion, and catalysis • Provides and maintain ten world-class national laboratories and scientific facilities • Directly supports (FY ‘07) the research of approximately 24,200 Ph.D.’s, Post Doctoral Associates, and Graduate Students (an increase of ~2600 from FY 2006) The President’s FY 2007 budget enhances the Office of Science’s lead role in support for U.S. physical sciences
  18. 18. In FY07 SC will construct, operate and plan for scientific facilities for the future of science: Consequences for Competitiveness and Education • ITER – the penultimate step to abundant, economical, and environmentally benign fusion energy • Leadership in High-End Computation – Provide more than 250 teraflops capability for modeling and simulation of scientific grand-challenge problems in combustion, fusion, and complex chemical reactions – 100 teraflops Blue Gene P computer with peak capacity of up to 100 teraflops to expend architectural diversity in leadership computing and address scientific challenges in materials science, catalysis, protein/DNA complexes, and advanced designs of nuclear reactors – Increase capacity at National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) to 100-150 teraflops for high performance production computing. • Linac Coherent Light Source construction continues – this X-Ray Free Electron Laser will allow examination of chemical reactions in real-time at the single molecule level • Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) begins operations as the world’s forefront neutron scattering facility by an order of magnitude
  19. 19. The President's FY 2007 budget maintains U.S. leadership in the following areas: • DOE Nanocenters 4 of 5 facilities begin operations, as the flagships of nanoscience – providing the U.S. with resources unmatched anywhere in the world • International Linear Collider R&D funding doubled to $60M – would give the U.S. world leadership in the study of particle physics in the next decade • Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) Upgrade project engineering design (PED) to double energy – will give new insights on the quark structure of matter • RHIC – leverage the unique capabilities of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory for studies of the internal quark- gluon structure of nucleons and the properties of hot, dense nuclear matter • National Synchrotron Light Source-II, to begin R&D and project engineering design (PED) in FY 2007 – a light source user facility with the world's finest capabilities for x-ray imaging
  20. 20. High Energy Physics (HEP) $717M in FY06 Understand the unification of fundamental particles and forces and the mysterious forms of unseen energy and matter that dominate the universe; search for possible new dimensions of space; and investigate the nature of time itself. – Supports 90% of U.S. High Energy Physics and Coordinates with NSF, NASA and International Efforts – HEP’s Fermilab Currently Holds the Energy Frontier and the Potential for Higgs Physics – HEP’s SLAC is Transitioning to LCLS but the Physics Program Continues until 2009 – Partner in the Large Hadron Collider – the Next Frontier – Initiative in Physics of Neutrino Masses and Mixing – Research Efforts in Dark Energy, Dark Matter, Lattice QCD – R&D for the International Linear Collider – Future Frontier
  21. 21. Nuclear Physics (NP) $367M in FY06 Understand the evolution and structure of nuclear matter, from the smallest building blocks, quarks and gluons; to the elements in the universe created by stars; to unique isotopes created in the laboratory that exist at the limits of stability, possessing radically different properties from known matter. – Supports 90% of U.S. Nuclear Physics and Coordinates with NSF, NASA and International Efforts – NP’s RHIC is Unique Forefront Heavy Ion Facility • EBIS Upgrade Underway, Additional Upgrade Planned – NP’s CEBAF is Unique Forefront Nuclear Confinement Facility • Upgrade Planned – Partner in Large Hadron Collider - Heavy Ion Program – R&D for Rare Isotope Accelerator – Future Frontier Facility – Research Efforts in High Energy Density Physics, Double Beta Decay, Lattice QCD and Nuclear Structure
  22. 22. Biological and Environmental Research (BER) $580M in FY06 Provide the biological and environmental discoveries necessary to clean and protect our environment, offer new energy alternatives, and fundamentally alter the future of medical care and human health. – Life Sciences with Energy and Environment Potential • Microbial Ethanol, Bioremediation, Carbon Sequestration, Etc. – Key Partner in Genomics • Facilities - Joint Genome Institute, Mouse Genetics Research Facility • 3-4 Genomics: GTL Facilities Planned – Key Partner in Climate Change Efforts • Aerosols, Atmospheric Radiation, Clouds; Facilities - FACE, ARM) – Environmental Sciences for DOE Mission needs • Environmental and Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) – Medical Applications that Utilize DOE Capabilities / Technologies • Artificial Retina – R&D Magazine “Inventor of the Year”
  23. 23. Basic Energy Sciences (BES) $1,135M in FY06 Provide the scientific knowledge and tools to achieve energy independence, securing U.S. leadership and essential breakthroughs in basic energy sciences. – Unique Suite of Scientific Research Facilities that Provide a Spectrum of Capabilities to a Wide Array of Researchers • Three Neutron Scattering Facilities, Four Synchrotron Radiation Light Sources, Three Electron Beam Microcharacterization Centers, the Combustion Research Facility, Materials Preparation Center, and Notre Dame Radiation Lab • Forefront Capabilities at new Facilities: Spallation Neutron Source, Five Nanoscale Science Research Centers, the Transmission Electron Aberration Corrected Microscope, and the Linac Coherent Light Source – Core Basic Research in Nanoscience, Materials, Engineering, Chemistry, Catalysis, Geosciences, Energy Biosciences – Initiatives in Nanoscience, Energy (Hydrogen, Solar, Solid State Lighting)
  24. 24. Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) $235M in FY06 Deliver forefront computational and networking capabilities to scientists nationwide that enable them to extend the frontiers of science, answering critical questions that range from the function of living cells to the power of fusion energy. – Facilities - NERSC, ESNet, Leadership Class Computing Facility • Upgrades to NERSC and ESNet Planned – Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) • Partnerships with Science Programs in Simulation and Applications of Terascale computing to Scientific Research – Testbeds and Partnerships for Next Generation Architecture – Core Research in Applied Math, Networks, Computer Science – Expansion of Ultrascale Computing Efforts Planned
  25. 25. Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) $288M in FY06 Answer the key scientific questions and overcome enormous technical challenges to harness the power that fuels a star, realizing by the middle of this century a landmark scientific achievement by bringing “fusion power to the grid”. – The U.S. Investment in Fusion Energy Sciences – 90% of Plasma Science – coordinated with NSF and NASA – Partner in High Energy Density Physics – Partner with NNSA in Inertial Fusion – 3 Unique Fusion Experiments • National Spherical Torus Experiment, Alcator C-Mod, and D-IIID – New Facility – National Compact Stellarator Experiment – Partner in ITER – Next Frontier Facility
  26. 26. Obtaining Funding • Apply to a Project – Ex: SciDAC grant at http://www.science.doe.gov/grants/FAPN06-04.html; deadline for letter of intent January 23, 2006 • Apply to an SC Program – Ex: Nuclear Physics at http://www.sc.doe.gov/np/grants/grants.html • Apply to a National Lab – Ex: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory at http://www.pnl.gov/main/business/index.html All this info can be found at the SC web site, www.science.doe.gov

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