CHEM 1120

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CHEM 1120

  1. 1. Metropolitan Community College COURSE OUTLINE FORM (Page 1 of 5) Course Title: Chemistry for the Health Sciences I Course Prefix & No.: CHEM 1120 LEC: 2.5 LAB: 1.5 Credit Hours: 3 COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course is designed to give students entering a health career fundamental knowledge of those areas of chemistry that relate to physiological principles. This couse will cover topics that include solutions; acids, bases and buffers; nuclear chemistry; equilibrium and an introduction to organic chemistry. The course material will be presented in lecture form to introduce the topics/information and the concepts will be reinforced through laboratory experiments. CHEM 1120 will be taught during the first part of the quarter to be followed immediately by CHEM 1130. Both CHEM 1120/1130 must be completed for transfer as a four-semester credit chemistry course for baccalaureate work. This course includes both lecture and lab components. COURSE PREREQUISITE (S): CHEM 1010 or CHEM 121C. Co-requisite: MATH 1310 (must be taken at same time or completed earlier) RATIONALE: Although this course provides a broad base of topics that are of interest to many students, it is designed to give students pursuing one of the health careers a comprehensive study of those aspects of chemistry that interrelate with physiological principles and are particularly relevant to the health careers. REQUIRED TEXTBOOK (S) and/or MATERIALS: Title: General, Organic and Biochemistry: Connecting Chemistry to Your Life Edition: 2007/02 Author: Ira Blei and George Odian Publisher: Worth Publishers Materials:       Attached course outline written by: Bernadette R. Corbett Date: 02/26/03 Reviewed/Revised by: Bernadette R. Corbett       Date: 07/18/05 Effective quarter of course outline: FA/05 ________ Academic Dean:       Date: __      ESO Revised 3-13-01
  2. 2. Metropolitan Community College COURSE OUTLINE FORM (Page 2 of 5) Course Objectives, Topical Unit Outlines, and Unit Objectives must be attached to this form. TITLE: Chemistry for the Health Careers I PREFIX/NO: CHEM 1120 COURSE OBJECTIVES: At completion of this course, the student should be able to: 1. demonstrate an understanding of the properties of solutions in terms of composition, concentration, polarity, electrolytes/non-electrolytes, osmosis and osmotic pressure and the role of solutions in chemical and physiological systems; 2. demonstrate a knowledge of the properties of acids, bases and buffers and their role in physiological systems; 3. demonstrate an understanding of nuclear chemistry including radioactive decay, radiation protection, radioactivity detection and the use of nuclear chemistry in medicine; 4. describe in very general terms the basic principles of organic chemistry including a. structure and composition b. difference between molecular and structural formulas c. describe the different classifications of organic compounds based on functional groups d. the role of organic chemistry in physiological systems; 5. demonstrate the ability to perform laboratory experiments safely, interpret the data collected and provide a reasonable conclusion based on the experimental data. TOPICAL UNIT OUTLINE/UNIT OBJECTIVES: Unit 1. Solutions Upon completion of this unit, students should be able to describe or define: 1. the parts of a solution 2. the properties of water as a solvent 3. electrolytes vs non-electrolytes 4. solubility of a solute and effect of temperature on solubility 5. concentration in units of a. Percent b. Mass/mass percent c. Volume/volume percent d. Molarity 6. the difference between colloids and suspensions 7. the difference between osmosis and diffusion a. the role of osmosis in dialysis b. the difference between isotonic, hypotonic and hypertonic solutions ESO Revised 3-13-01
  3. 3. Metropolitan Community College COURSE OUTLINE FORM (Page 3 of 5) Unit 2. Acids, Bases and Buffers Upon completion of this unit, student should be able to: 1. defining acids and bases according to Arrhenius and Bronsted-Lowry 2. define/describe the ionization of water 3. define/describe the pH scale 4. distinguish between strong and weak acids and bases: chemical equilibrium 5. describe making dilutions from solutions and calculate new concentrations 6. describe acid-base neutralization reactions in terms of reactants and products 7. describe titration reactions 8. describe buffers in terms of a. components of a buffer system b. the three main types of physiological buffers c. the role of physiological buffer systems in maintaining physiological pH Unit 3. Nuclear Chemistry Upon completion of this unit, students should be able to: 1. describe natural radioactivity: alpha, beta and gamma radiation 2. describe the types of radiation protection 3. describe the nuclear equation and radioactive decay: the half-life 4. describe the production of radioactive isotopes 5. describe radiation detection and measurement 6. describe the types of medical application using radioactivity Unit 4. Introduction to Organic Chemistry Upon completion of this unit, students should be able to: 1. compare and contrast the types of hydrocarbons: alkanes, alkenes, alkynes and aromatic compounds 2. describe bonding in carbon compounds 3. compare structural features of carbon compounds 4. describe the aromatic hydrocarbons in terms of a. stability b. their role in health medicine 5. describe a functional group 6. describe the haloalkanes in terms of their role a. as anesthetics b. as pesticides c. in ozone depletion 7. polymers ESO Revised 3-13-01
  4. 4. Metropolitan Community College COURSE OUTLINE FORM (Page 4 of 5) COURSE REQUIREMENTS/EVALUATION: COURSE OBJECTIVES/ASSESSMENT MEASURES COURSE OBJECTIVES ASSESSMENT MEASURES 1. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the properties of solutions in terms of composition, concentration, polarity, electrolyte, osmosis and osmotic pressure and the role of solutions in chemical and physiological systems.       1a. Students will be tested in the classroom on the basic properties and uses of solutions including calculations related to composition and concentration. 1b. Students will perform laboratory experiments on the properties of solutions. They will demonstrate their understanding by submitting a lab report on their results. A minimum average score of 70% is required for both types of assessment.       2. Students will demonstrate and understanding of the properties acids, bases and buffers and their role in chemical and physiological systems.       2a. Students will be tested in the classroom on the basic properties of acids, bases and buffers. Testing will including calculations related to composition and concentration as well as writing chemical equations to illustrate their chemical behavior. 2b. Students will perform laboratory experiments on the properties of acids, bases and buffers. They will demonstrate their understanding by submitting a lab report on their results. A minimum average score of 70% is required for both types of assessment. 3. Students will demonstrate and understanding of radioactivity including nuclear decay, nuclear detection and protection and the use of radioactivity in nuclear medicine.       3. Students will be tested in the classroom on the basic properties of nuclear chemistry including reactions and calculations based on nuclear decay. A minimum average score of 70% is required.       ESO Revised 3-13-01
  5. 5. Metropolitan Community College COURSE OUTLINE FORM (Page 5 of 5) 4. Students will describe in very general terms the basic principles of organic chemistry including structural features, properties and functional group classifications. 4a. Students will be tested in the classroom on the basic properties of acids, bases and buffers. Testing will including calculations related to composition and concentration as well as writing chemical equations to illustrate their chemical behavior. 4b. Students will perform laboratory experiments on the properties of acids, bases and buffers. They will demonstrate their understanding by submitting a lab report on their results. A minimum average score of 70% is required for both types of assessment.       5. demonstrate the ability to perform lab experiments safely, to interpret the data collected and to draw reasonable conclusions based on the experimental data 5. Students are required to perform laboratory experiments throughout the course and to submit reports. Questions asked in the lab reports will be used to assess student comprehension of the concepts being illustrated in the laboratory exercise. A minimum average score of 70% is required. ESO Revised 3-13-01
  6. 6. Metropolitan Community College COURSE OUTLINE FORM (Page 5 of 5) 4. Students will describe in very general terms the basic principles of organic chemistry including structural features, properties and functional group classifications. 4a. Students will be tested in the classroom on the basic properties of acids, bases and buffers. Testing will including calculations related to composition and concentration as well as writing chemical equations to illustrate their chemical behavior. 4b. Students will perform laboratory experiments on the properties of acids, bases and buffers. They will demonstrate their understanding by submitting a lab report on their results. A minimum average score of 70% is required for both types of assessment.       5. demonstrate the ability to perform lab experiments safely, to interpret the data collected and to draw reasonable conclusions based on the experimental data 5. Students are required to perform laboratory experiments throughout the course and to submit reports. Questions asked in the lab reports will be used to assess student comprehension of the concepts being illustrated in the laboratory exercise. A minimum average score of 70% is required. ESO Revised 3-13-01

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