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Crafting the Discovery Phase: Starting Design Projects Right

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What's the best approach for structuring your design or product discovery phase? Does it even make sense to call it a phase?

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Crafting the Discovery Phase: Starting Design Projects Right

  1. 1. Crafting the Discovery Phase First Steps in Effective IA Projects IA Summit 2016 Atlanta Dan Brown EightShapes
  2. 2. Your group will need… post-its (provided) pen (not provided) sustenance (optional)
  3. 3. How designers communicate complicated ideas… … and make sure they don’t kill each other
  4. 4. #discovery @brownorama
  5. 5. 1 Discovery Defined
  6. 6. Design Decisions Navigation Structure Product Objectives Button Style Menu Design
  7. 7. Scope Quantity
  8. 8. Design Decisions Navigation Structure Product Objectives Button Style Menu Design
  9. 9. Navigation Structure Product Objectives Button Style Menu Design Do I have enough information?
  10. 10. Symptoms 1. Lack of alignment 2. Lack of definition 3. Lack of participation
  11. 11. Discovery Defined A set of activities
 that yield shared knowledge
 to structure and inform
 design decisions
 about a particular product.
  12. 12. 2 Activities & Outputs
  13. 13. What do you do here? What do you deliver here? Discovery Phase?
  14. 14. 1.Groupalltheactivitiesandoutputs. 2.Labelyourcategories. 3.Feelfreetoaddmore. DiscoveryActivities&Outputs
  15. 15. The Noun Project • Shmidt Sergey
  16. 16. 3 Framing & Setting
  17. 17. Dan’s Observation Setting
 Direction+ Framing Problem
  18. 18. Framing Problem
  19. 19. Problem Solution
  20. 20. Inputs and Relationships Product
 Design Interpretation and Methods
  21. 21. Inputs and Relationships Product
 Design Desired Impact Actual Impact Interpretation and Methods
  22. 22. Inputs and Relationships Product Design Desired Impact Actual Impact Interpretation and Methods
  23. 23. Dan's Observation Setting
 Direction+ Framing Problem
  24. 24. Dan's Observation Setting
 Direction
  25. 25. Inputs and Relationships Product
 Design Desired Impact Actual Impact Interpretation and Methods
  26. 26. Inputs and Relationships Desired Impact Actual Impact Interpretation and Methods
  27. 27. 4 The Tension
  28. 28. FramingProblem
 SettingDirection Nowgroupyourstickies…
  29. 29. Dan's Observation Setting
 Direction+ Framing Problem
  30. 30. Framing the Problem 1. Problem Statements 2. Objectives 3. Contextual Statements
  31. 31. Problem statements Captures the aspect of the world we’re trying to change or improve. Architecturalinternshaveno consistentwayoftracking theirhoursofexperience.
  32. 32. Project objectives Defines the project’s desired outcome. Designamobileappfor internstorecordtheirhours.
  33. 33. Contextual statements Describe the ecosystem in which the product will live. -Internsareexpertsmartphoneusers -Hoursmustappearin.25increments -TheproductmustbeaniOSapp
  34. 34. Setting the Direction 1. Principles or Implications 2. Concepts 3. Models
  35. 35. Principles What the product should do. What makes it unique. What makes it better. Eliminateunnecessary obstaclestopublishing.
  36. 36. Implications What findings imply. Usefewerstepstopublish draftcontent.
  37. 37. Concepts What’s the big idea. Twittermeetshealthcare.
  38. 38. Models How the product looks and behaves.
  39. 39. Models How the product looks and behaves. sitemap flowchart storyboard wireframes mock-ups samplecopy
  40. 40. 5 The Matrix
  41. 41. Setting DirectionFraming Problem Card sort User interviews Stakeholder interviews Baseline testing Technical analysis Content audit Brand analysis Survey Expert review Comparative review Requirements gathering Data analysis Story writing Persona writing Task analysis Journey mapping Storyboarding Mood boards Sketching Prototyping Wireframing Design studio Site mapping Concept modeling Prioritizing Planning Batching Brainstorming Scheduling Roadmapping
  42. 42. Framing Problem Setting Direction DivergentConvergent
  43. 43. Framing Problem Setting Direction DivergentConvergent Gathering Processing Exploring Focusing
  44. 44. Framing Problem Setting Direction DivergentConvergent Gathering Processing Exploring Focusing problem statements project objectives contextual statements principles concepts models
  45. 45. Framing Problem Setting Direction DivergentConvergent Gathering Processing Exploring Focusing - interview stakeholders - conduct domain research - review existing documentation - conduct user research - evaluate competitors - evaluate current product - watch people use the product
  46. 46. Framing Problem Setting Direction DivergentConvergent Gathering Processing Exploring Focusing - find the patterns - capture hunches - group your observations - create a narrative - describe a scenario - visualize the problem
  47. 47. Framing Problem Setting Direction DivergentConvergent Gathering Processing Exploring Focusing - use a common pattern - ignore constraints to provoke ideas - sketch together - get some feedback
  48. 48. Framing Problem Setting Direction DivergentConvergent Gathering Processing Exploring Focusing - revise and refine - prioritize insights and ideas - draft a project plan - consider implications
  49. 49. Framing Problem Setting Direction DivergentConvergent Gathering Processing Exploring Focusing - revise and refine - prioritize insights and ideas - draft a project plan - consider implications - use a common pattern - ignore constraints to provoke ideas - sketch together - get some feedback - find the patterns - capture hunches - group your observations - create a narrative - describe a scenario - visualize the problem - interview stakeholders - conduct domain research - review existing documentation - conduct user research - evaluate competitors - evaluate current product - watch people use the product http://j.mp/discovery-matrix
  50. 50. Arrangeyourpost-itsinroughchronologicalorder. Imagineatime-frame. Considerhowyouwillbalancegathering/processing andexploring/focusing. Createaprojectplan
  51. 51. Short on user insights User interviews Analysis F E P G Sketch Wireframe Plan
  52. 52. Produce ideas quickly Test Kick- off Wireframe Test Wireframe Test Wireframe F E P G Plan & Prioritize
  53. 53. Just give us “blue sky” F E P G User Interviews Sketching
  54. 54. Creating concepts only F E P G User Interviews Sketching User Interviews Sketching Plan Plan
  55. 55. 6 The Attitude
  56. 56. Navigation Structure Product Objectives Button Style Menu Design Do I have enough information?
  57. 57. Embracing the Attitude PERCEIVE Deficiency in knowledge
  58. 58. Embracing the Attitude UNDERSTAND Need to fill gaps
  59. 59. Embracing the Attitude CHOOSE Engage in activities to increase knowledge
  60. 60. Mindset Defined PERCEIVE UNDERSTAND CHOOSE ACT MINDSET
  61. 61. Carol Dweck’s Mindset ❦ ❦
  62. 62. Fixed vs. Growth
  63. 63. Curious You are excited to learn new things. ❦ Skeptical You don’t accept all assertions at face value. ❦ Humble You embrace your naivety and ignorance.
  64. 64. Curious PERCEIVE → UNDERSTAND → CHOOSE There are gaps in my knowledge. We can’t know everything, but I’m excited to learn as much as I can. I will take the time to learn about areas in this project I don’t understand. You are excited to learn new things.
  65. 65. Curiosity in Discovery ASK QUESTIONS Our first instinct is often to provide answers and opinions. Short circuit your natural inclination and force yourself to ask questions. ❦
  66. 66. Skeptical You don’t accept all assertions at face value. PERCEIVE → UNDERSTAND → CHOOSE Some of our work depends on making assumptions. We can’t validate all assumptions, but we can look at those with greatest impact. I will uncover and question assumptions.
  67. 67. Skepticism in Discovery PLAY DEVIL’S ADVOCATE It’s easy to buy into assumptions when other people hold them sincerely and tenaciously. Gently pry open those assumptions by representing a different perspective. ❦
  68. 68. Humble You embrace your naivety and ignorance. PERCEIVE → UNDERSTAND → CHOOSE Though I have some experience with this domain, I don’t know everything about it. Even my experience doesn’t qualify me as an expert, nor does it let me make presumptions about the target users. I will assume that most other people are experts about this particular domain.
  69. 69. Humility in Discovery SAY “I DON’T KNOW” Part of being humble is being OK with admitting weakness. Lack of knowledge is often perceived as weakness. Be honest with your colleagues and yourself when you’re not clear on something. ❦
  70. 70. Wrap-Up
  71. 71. Discovery Defined A set of activities
 that yield shared knowledge
 to structure and inform
 design decisions
 about a particular product.
  72. 72. Problem & Direction Inputs and Relationships Desired Impact Actual Impact Interpretation and Methods
  73. 73. Assertions Stating the Problem Envisioning the Solution • Problem Statements • Objectives • Contextual Statements • Principles or Implications • Concepts • Models
  74. 74. The Matrix Framing Problem Setting Direction DivergentConvergent Gathering Processing Exploring Focusing
  75. 75. Discovery is Attitude Curious You are excited to learn new things. ❦ Skeptical You don’t accept all assertions at face value. ❦ Humble You embrace your naivety and ignorance.
  76. 76. THANK YOU Want to learn more about the book? Dan Brown dan@eightshapes.com http://j.mp/designdiscoverybook

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