Post primary sse 15 november 2012

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  • Introduction, housekeeping. Please ensure the following are available at each table for participants:
    - Post it notes
    Miniature tab notes
    Markers
    The purpose of today’s seminar is to introduce and mediate the SSE guidelines and related materials as recently launched by the DES.
    School self-evaluation is a process through which schools can bring about improvement in teaching and learning
    Note to Presenter: Change name of EC and date accordingly on opening slide
  • The overarching objective of today’s seminar is to ensure that you return to school with a clear understanding of the SSE process towards initiating the process with your staff and school community. Many of you will have already have embarked on the process and we hope that today’s presentation and associated activities will further refine your understanding of SSE and provide some additional information and insights
    SSE is recognised as a process which leads to improved practice in the classroom and more importantly improved outcomes for learners. As well as providing you with key information , there is a strong practical and interactive dimension to the day which we hope will bring the process alive through the use of authentic materials and group discussion.
    Presenter’s notes : Outline detail of each session and start/finish times for the day – please amend the start and finish times in accordance with your own seminar details.
    Each session will include reference to the stories of pilot schools who engaged with the draft guidelines and there will be opportunities for reflection
  • The objectives for the day are as follows
    Introduce School Self-Evaluation Guidelines…
    These guidelines are designed to support teachers, principals and staff as they collaborate to ensure better outcomes for the young people in their schools. They replace the draft guidelines which were available for schools to look and comment on during the last school year. Following feedback from all partners during the consultation period, changes have been made respectively.
    2. Provide rationale for School Self-Evaluation…
    These Guidelines bring best national and international practice into Irish schools. Experience and research in Ireland and in many countries show us that some of the most beneficial changes in schools occur when the principal, teachers and wider school community collaborate in a focussed way to improve how they teach and assess students’ learning. By asking questions of themselves about how teaching takes place and how well students are learning, teachers can readily identify what needs to change within the school to get better outcomes for their students.
    3. To set the context for school self-evaluation
    For many school self evaluation is not new – the school development planning process since 2003 has helped schools identify what is working well and areas for improvement. School self-evaluation builds on this solid foundation
    4. To outline the school self-evaluation process
    When engaging in school self-evaluation, schools engage in a process that enables them to reflect on their aims, consider criteria for success within their own context and ethos, and determine appropriate methods for judging the quality of educational provision in their school. It is an evidence-based approach which involves gathering data from a range of sources and making judgements with a view to bringing about improvements in pupils’ learning. We will explore the T & L framework and the 6 step process during this session – i.e. the what and the how of SSE
  • In pairs, ask participants to reflect on where they are at and then use post it notes on table to record any questions they may currently have regarding planning and implementing SSE back in their school.
    Presenter collects and sticks onto flipchart – tell participants that throughout the day we will endeavor to answer these queries and will refer back to them at regular intervals.
    Note to presenter – at break/lunch time read through these questions so that you are prepared for when these questions will be addressed at the end of session 3. You will find that many of the questions are similar so it might be a good idea to stick these on top of one another for efficiency later.
  • SSE is not only about identifying areas for improvement in our practice – it places a premium on identifying what schools are doing well and asks schools to record, celebrate and share these successes with the school community.
    Efforts to improve are no longer based solely on hunches or casual conclusions. In identifying what needs to improve, schools can be confident that steps they are taking as a result of the evaluation are rooted in baseline evidence and can set sound targets towards improvement.
    SSE is in-keeping with a democratic system of school evaluation. Totally supportive of schools and teachers - gives them more control- to take the initiative in improving the quality if teaching and learning they provide and plot their own path in doing so. With SSE schools are trusted to take the lead and plot their own path to success . SSE allows schools to say what they are /are not happy with. Mac Beath views SSE as a process which allows schools and teachers opportunities to speak for themselves
    An added benefit of SSE is it inevitably presents schools with potential areas for CPD – this puts teachers at the centre of identifying their own CPD needs that are directly informed by the teaching and leaning needs of the pupils.
    Acknowledges the context of the school - there is no blueprint. SSE will look different according to each schools context and work are unique, but this process can be adapted to suit all school contexts to affirm and celebrate what they are doing well, to decide on changes they would like to make based on the evidence they have gathered and to report this to their school communities
    The 6 step approach and the T & L framework together provides a logical way for schools to reflect on and review practice, record their results and plan for future action. The framework provides a focus and the 6 steps provide direction.
    Collects a range of views and perspectives – ensures that all relevant stakeholder views are heard and are factored into plans for improvement.
    At the heart if SSE is improved learning outcomes and experiences for all pupils.
     
  • External and internal evaluation ultimately focus on a shared mission of improvement. SSE can help develop a more enhanced complimentary function to both. SSE understands the need and place for both within a system and many countries are opting for a working compromise between the 2 .
    SSE positions schools and teachers as central to evaluating the quality of their provision for students. In internally reflecting on student outcomes, teacher practice and learner experiences and by drawing on evidence to make judgements , they are best placed to make their own recommendations for improvement. To this end, SSE will complement the external inspections that already take place within the education system. Essentially what most jurisdictions are striving for is a hybrid system of school evaluation which:
    “ …involves a varying mixture of self evaluation by schools and teachers, which encourages autonomy and professionalism, combined with external inspection to ensure accountability” (McNamara & O’ Hara, 2008 p.2)
    Research at home and abroad recognises that real school improvement is more likely when teachers are at the centre of an evaluation process which is rooted in reflection, which is enquiry based and which ultimately results in targets for action planning.
    It is recognised that teachers are best placed to make judgements about their own practice and to put their own recommendation for improvement in place.
    Internal accountability: Schools and teachers in being best placed to judge and evaluate the quality of their provision for students are being asked to internally reflect on student outcomes, teacher practice and learner experiences and to make their own recommendations for improvement
    To this end, SSE will complement the external inspections that already take place within the education system.
    Frameworks and development in policy over the last number of years which support this rationale include;
    1. Education Act 1998 - states in section 7 (2) (b) of the Act – the minister is required “to monitor and assess the quality….and effectiveness of the Education system provided in the State by recognised schools and centres for education….” -
    2. Teaching Council – Code of Conduct (sections 4, 5 & 6 – teacher professional practice) outlines the expected professional behaviours and attitudes of teachers as professionals in relation to internal accountability
    http://www.teachingcouncil.ie/_fileupload/Professional%20Standards/code_of_conduct_2012_web%2019June2012.pdf
    5.1: reflecting on and critically evaluating their professional practice, in light of their professional knowledge base (p.10)
    3. Literacy and Numeracy Strategy 2011 pg 82 – SSE is NOT an add -on to the requirements outlined in the L & N Strategy. Rather it is an inherent part of the strategy and facilitates us to realise the aims articulated in the L & N strategy. A key emphasis in the National Strategy is that we use a variety of evidence to support our professional judgement on the effectiveness of our literacy and numeracy practices (this is what is meant by the term ‘robust self-evaluation). “requires all schools to engage in robust SE and put in place a 3 year school improvement plan which includes specific targets for the promotion and improvement of literacy and numeracy.”
    The introduction of systematic school self-evaluation complements the implementation of the National Literacy and Numeracy Strategy.
    Reference chapter 1 of the advisor handbook and foreword from the guidelines.
     
     
  • The concept of school improvement is not new. The SSE process is a reframing of the school development planning process
    1. LAOS (2003) – was designed to assist school community in reviewing and evaluating the work of their schools. It looked at 5 broad dimensions within the school context – management, planning, curriculum provision, learning and teaching in curriculum areas and support for students.
    2. Many schools already engage in school development planning and have shown that this approach is both practical and effective.
    As part of the SDP process schools first reviewed existing practice.
    They then identified areas of need and set targets for improvement
    Action plans were agreed and implemented.
    strategies and action plans were implemented and monitored leading to further review where the process began again
    . The main shift being at the review stage where solid evidence is required to justify the identification of strengths/areas for improvement.
    Self-evaluation should not be additional to SPD, rather it seeks to provide a sharper focus for the SDP process
  • Presenters notes : this is a book walk exercise to draw attention to the main sections of the guidelines and to point out features to which we will be making regular reference today.
    Please take this opportunity to walk participants through the contents page of the guidelines and allow time for each of the following sections to be tabbed appropriately. Give participants to skim read and offer comment
    Chapter 2 – SSE process – p. 11
    Chapter 3 – SSE Framework – p.21
    Chapter 4 – Evaluation criteria and quality statements – p.27
    Chapter 5 - Evaluation approaches and methods – p.47
    Chapter 6 – SSE Report and SIP – p.59
    Appendix – Extra tools – p. 69
  • Bring participants to pg 13 – principles of SSE table 2.1 – give time for participants to read these. Elicit feedback as to what important messages are emerging from this table regarding SSE in schools. Synopsis with key messages we have taken and transferred to slide.
  • Read aloud to participants This quote summarizes the key messages on slide 9 and reminds us that SSE is a process, for schools to reflect on current practices, backed up by evidence all working towards improving teaching and learning.
    What questions do we need to ask ourselves about School Self Evaluation – this is answered on page 12 in the guidelines
    How well are we doing?
    How do we know? What evidence do we have?
    How can we find out more?
    What are our strengths?
    How are our areas for improvement?
    How can we improve?
    Ask participants to highlight these in the guidelines
  • Circular and A5 leaflet says :
    Experience has told us that it takes a number of years to build good self-evaluation processes in schools. Change will take time to become fully established and that teachers, principals and others involved will need to be supported. Over the next 4 years, schools are expected to evaluate literacy, numeracy and one other aspect of teaching and learning. Gaelscoileanna and scoileanna Gaeltachta engage in evaluation in Literacy L1 & L2 and Numeracy. You and your staff choose your focus after taking stock of what you already know about how your school is doing in these areas.
    A whole-school approach to the self-evaluation and improvement of literacy and numeracy should be adopted. Each subject department should put in place three-year improvement plans with targets to improve outcomes for students in the subject and to support and improve the acquisition of literacy and numeracy skills.
     
    Generally schools should engage in school self-evaluation of one or more aspects of teaching and learning across all subjects and programmes each year. However, it is acknowledged that the process may take more time in the early stages.
     
    Therefore over a four-year period from 2012, all post-primary schools should engage in robust school self-evaluation and produce three-year improvement plans for Mathematics and numeracy, literacy (English in English medium schools and Irish and English in Irish medium schools) and one or more aspects of teaching and learning across all subjects and programmes.
     
    The schedule below provides flexibility to schools in how they will achieve the national targets set out in the Literacy and Numeracy Strategy.
     
    Schedule of school self-evaluation in a post-primary school
     In the school year 2012/13, schools should start the process of self-evaluation. In that year they should select one of the following options: literacy, numeracy, one or more aspects of teaching and learning. In subsequent years, schools should select again from the above options so that, within the four-year period, a school self-evaluation report and a three-year school improvement plan for literacy, for numeracy and for one or more aspects of teaching and learning across all subjects will be completed.
     
    Each year the school should adopt a whole-school approach to improving the area selected for self-evaluation. Each subject department will:
     
    Engage in self-evaluation of the subject with a specific focus on the area selected
    Complete a school self-evaluation report that identifies strengths and areas for development in the area selected
    Complete a three-year school improvement plan for the area selected, which becomes one element of the school’s overall school improvement plan
    Begin implementation of this element of the school improvement plan
    Monitor the implementation of the element of the school improvement plan completed in the previous school year.
    Numeracy encompasses the ability to use mathematical understanding and skills to solve problems and meet the demands of day-to-day living in complex social settings
     
    Literacy includes the capacity to read, understand and critically appreciate various forms of communication including spoken language, printed text, broadcast media, and digital media. Literacy for learners in English-medium schools and settings should be understood primarily as literacy in English. In the case of Irish-medium schools, literacy should be understood as both Irish as the first language of the school and English.
     
    Irish medium schools should engage in self-evaluation of numeracy and Mathematics, Literacy in Irish and literacy in English over the first four-year period.
    SCHOOL SELF-EVALUATION IN DEIS SCHOOLS
     
    Schools within the DEIS programme have been required to develop and implement school improvement plans (called DEIS action plans) as part of the requirements for DEIS funding since 2006/07. The work required of schools in forming and implementing DEIS action plans is very similar to that required in the school self-evaluation process. With effect from the date of this circular, DEIS schools may meet the planning and reporting requirements for DEIS funding through completing the school self-evaluation process.
     
    Frequently, the action plans developed in DEIS schools have focused on the review and improvement of literacy and numeracy. In schools where thorough review and improvement planning for literacy and numeracy have already been completed and recorded, the school community will be focusing on monitoring and implementing the action plans developed to date. In such schools, the next stage of the school self-evaluation process may focus on teaching and learning in areas other than literacy and numeracy in the period 2012-16.
  • School self-evaluation is about maintaining high standards and improving the learning experiences and educational outcomes for the pupils in our schools. It is important that in developing their school self-evaluation processes, schools focus in the first instance on the quality of teaching and learning in classrooms and other learning settings in the school. It is also important for a school to adopt a planned approach to self-evaluation in order to obtain relevant and reliable information on an on-going basis that can be used to inform school improvement targets. Clarity around what is to be evaluated, how it is to be evaluated, and when and by whom it is to be evaluated is required. Schools should also be aware of how the particular aspects of teaching and learning, including literacy and numeracy, it is focusing on fit within a broader teaching and learning perspective.
     
    To assist schools in this regard, a quality framework for evaluating teaching and learning is provided. The framework highlights the links between learner outcomes and the teaching and learning processes that underpin the achievement of those outcomes. Open Page 24 of the Guidelines. Here we see an overview of good practice in the three quality themes (Figure 3.3) which may be useful for general reflection on teaching and learning. These should be scanned (collaboratively) and pick some that are relevant in your school.
    It is often a good idea at this point to examine available data on outcomes such as ST results, assessment records. This will further provide insight into an in need of improvement and may signal to the school what the focus of the evaluation will be (i.e. Literacy/Numeracy)
    Presenter’s notes: Schools aren’t starting from a blank slate i.e. some schools here may want to introduce new practices while other schools may want to develop existing ones. We are aware that schools may have already chosen their area of focus (Literacy or Numeracy) from the publication of the Literacy and Numeracy Strategy (2011) . This is a good start. Therefore these schools should consider bearing in mind the other themes – learning experiences and teachers’ practice, at this stage in their evaluation.
  • JARGON BUSTING SESSION
    Ask participants to write dimension beside Teaching & Learning explain that thisis one of the five dimensions form LAOS page (iii)
    Theme beside Learner Outcomes
    Sub theme beside Attainment of curriculum objectives
    Open pg. 24 and 25 of the Guidelines. Here we see an overview of good practice in the three quality themes (Figure 3.3) which may be very useful for general reflection on teaching and learning. This figure can be used to help schools decide on their focus either literacy or numeracy and/or can be broadly scanned to help schools draw attention to areas where the school is performing well/ could be performing better in their chosen area.
    Give participants time to read through figure 3.3
    Reflection sheet is on also p83 of guidelines.
    It is often a good idea at this point to examine available data on outcomes such as ST results, assessment records. This will further provide insight into an in need of improvement and may signal to the school what the focus of the evaluation will be (i.e. Literacy/Numeracy)
    In sessions 2 and 3 we will see how schools used this figure to inform their school self evaluation journey.
  • Schools will now have a focus for their evaluation i.e. Literacy/Numeracy.
    The school in considering all 3 themes, will scan now the subthemes in order to broadly identify what is going well/not so well in the teaching and learning of Literacy/Numeracy. There will as a result choose subthemes or aspects of subthemes which will provide the lens for the evaluation of Literacy/Numeracy/Other area
    For subthemes to be selected for evaluation:
    schools need to know what these subthemes mean: So Take time here to discuss subthemes and what each subtheme entails. Pg 23
    will choose subthemes to be evaluated depending on how well here are doing in these subthemes – bring participants to the evaluation criteria for each subtheme in Chapter 4 of the SSE Guidelines. Pg 30, 32,34, 36 38, 40 , 42, 44). Schools will scan these.
    Learner outcomes in a good place to start – pg 30
    The subthemes broken down into criteria– and they delineate what quality means in specific aspects of each of the sub-themes and will help to guide schools in making initial judgements about pupils’ achievement or aspects of teaching and learning. .Some subthemes (or parts of subthemes) will emerge as strengths for a school. Certain subthemes (or parts of subthemes) will emerge as needing evaluation and as a result will be the lens through which the evaluation process will take place. Decision can then be taken to look at sub theme during evaluation or not. For example a school may select subthemes from each of the 3 themes as follows:
    Outcome ( Attainment of curriculum objectives)
    Teacher Practice (Teaching approaches, Assessment)
    Pupil Experience (Student engagement in learning. Learning to Learn)
    NB:
    Not all subthemes need to be evaluated.
    Not all criteria/aspects within a subtheme need to be evaluated
    It is best for schools to choose a small number to begin with.
    This process is Not mandatory but back to the value of the framework
    using the quality framework with themes, sub-themes and related criteria allows a school to initially review t and L in its broadest sense
    The selection of specific subthemes for evaluation and undertaking an in-depth enquiry into teaching and learning with regard to these only keeps it manageable
    The rewards are reaped when commencing the 6 step process - step 1 will now have a definite focus and the questions that we pose in step 1 will be based on the aspects of the subtheme that we want to evaluate.
    Ensures a shared language and allows a school organise their evaluation activities
    Note to presenter: There is a lot of vital and fundamental information on this slide. Take time to walk through each part and do not hurry this stage!!
    Background notes on each theme and subtheme below
    1 Theme - The quality of learner outcomes (p.30)
     
     Subtheme - Attainment of curriculum objectives relates to pupils’ learning and achievements and their progress in learning across all areas of the curriculum, including literacy and numeracy.
     
    2 Theme - The quality of pupils’ learning experiences (p.32)
      
    Subtheme - Learning environment relates to the quality of the physical setting in which teaching and learning takes place
    Subtheme -Pupils’ engagement in learning relates to pupils’ learning experiences in terms of the range and suitability of the curriculum approaches the pupils experience in the course of their learning
    Subtheme -Learning to learn relates to how pupils’ learning skills are developed and how schools equip pupils with the tools and skills needed for learning now and into the future
     
    3 Theme -The quality of teachers’ practice(p.38)
    You will find the evaluation criteria for each subtheme in Chapter 4 of the SSE Guidelines. The criteria delineate what quality means in specific aspects of each of the sub-themes and will help to guide schools in making judgements about pupils’ achievement or aspects of teaching and learning. In addition, the criteria will provide management, teachers and other education partners with real clarity about what is important and a language for discussing what is working well and what needs to be improved. It is suggested that schools use the quality framework with themes, sub-themes and related criteria to organise their evaluation activities. This will allow schools to undertake an in-depth enquiry into teaching and learning, and literacy and numeracy in a systematic and coherent way.
    The evaluation criteria for the subthemes may be helpful in informing their thinking and decisions. Some subthemes will emerge as strengths for a school. It is a good idea to record these at this point as they will be needed for inclusion in the SSE report. Certain subthemes will emerge as needing evaluation (record also!) and as a result will be the lens through which the evaluation process will take place. For example a school may select subthemes from each of the 3 themes as follows:
    Outcome ( Attainment of curriculum objectives)
    Teacher Practice (Teaching approaches, Assessment)
    Pupil Experience (Student engagement in learning. Learning to Learn)
    In essence, evaluation criteria outline what the “best school” practice encompasses and therefore will allow a school to identify where they stand in relation to this subtheme. Decision can then be taken to look at sub theme during evaluation or not. Word of caution, not all subthemes need to be evaluated. It is best for schools to choose a small number to begin with.
    Note to presenter: There is a lot of vital and fundamental information on this slide. Take time to walk through each part and do not hurry this stage!!
    Background notes on each theme and subtheme below
    1 Theme - The quality of learner outcomes (p.30)
     
     Subtheme - Attainment of curriculum objectives relates to pupils’ learning and achievements and their progress in learning across all areas of the curriculum, including literacy and numeracy.
     
    2 Theme - The quality of pupils’ learning experiences (p.32)
      
    Subtheme - Learning environment relates to the quality of the physical setting in which teaching and learning takes place
    Subtheme -Pupils’ engagement in learning relates to pupils’ learning experiences in terms of the range and suitability of the curriculum approaches the pupils experience in the course of their learning
    Subtheme -Learning to learn relates to how pupils’ learning skills are developed and how schools equip pupils with the tools and skills needed for learning now and into the future
     
    3 Theme -The quality of teachers’ practice(p.38)
      
    Subtheme -Preparation for teaching relates to how prepared teachers are for the delivery of the curriculum through the lessons they teach
    Subtheme -Teaching approaches relates to the effectiveness of the teaching approaches used in classrooms and in other learning settings in the school
    Subtheme -Management of pupils relates to the nature of teacher-pupil interactions and how pupils are managed and organised during learning activities
    Subtheme -Assessment relates to the effectiveness of the school’s assessment policy and practices in terms of how they contribute to assessment for learning (AfL) and assessment of learning (AoL)
     
     
  • First 3 points are helpful for a school to determine the focus of the evaluation ie Literacy/Numeracy or Other.
    However they are equally important to use again once the focus has been chosen: Revisit the first 3 points through the lens of Literacy/Numeracy/Other
    We have identified subthemes across the 3 themes for the focus of this evaluation and we may have used the evaluation criteria to help us here
    We have also taken note of strengths and areas for improvement in this regard
    Now we are ready to begin the 6 step process
  • As already stated School self-evaluation builds on the school development planning process. The process is iterative in that it facilitates repeated cycles of analysis or a return to a previous stage of the cycle as required. The school self-evaluation process is best described as a series of six steps. Schools and teachers will already be familiar with many of these steps from their experience of school development planning (SDP). The first three steps outline the review element of the SDP process. These important steps ensure that conclusions about strengths and areas for improvement are based on evidence from a range of relevant sources. The next steps ensure that schools retain a record of the evaluation and describe the actions for improvement. The final step, implement and monitor, takes place over a three-year period.
  • Step 1 is the gathering evidence phase. Typically, information should be gathered from a number of sources. Typically you will gather evidence from learner outcomes, from learning experiences and teachers’ practice. The evidence you gather will focus on the subthemes selected.
    This is the advantage of using the subthemes . The subthemes selected for evaluation and the nature of each allow a school determine the kind of information schools decide to gather, the data collection instruments they use and the questions posed.
    It may include both quantitative and qualitative data. Quantitative data relates to data that can be expressed numerically or statistically and qualitative data relates to data arising from people’s views or opinions. Both quantitative and qualitative data can be gathered from a range of sources including teachers, pupils, parents, management, classrooms and other learning settings in the school.
    Mac Beath cautions against the temptation to measure only that which is easily measured or to use only those tools which are immediately to hand. The things that are most important to you are often the hardest to measure (MacBeath, 1999:112)
    The purpose of triangulation is to increase the credibility and validity of the results – by using a number of self evaluation tools to see if, from the findings, there is a consistency in the evidence that is gathered.
    Not every piece of evidence needs o be actively gathered- schools will have a range of readily available evidence : Schools already gather data for a variety of purposes and much of this will prove beneficial in the SSE process. Teachers’ views and their records (assessment data, standardised test results) are useful examples of evidence. It is also important to ensure that the views of others form part of the evidence base.
    Bring participants to Chapter 5 Tables 5.1 (p50)
    Note on including wider voice:
    One of the key principals of effective SSE is the inclusion of the wider school community in the spirit of collaboration, partnership, trust and respect. SSE places parents and pupils not only as key recipients of the information about school achievements but as key contributors to its evaluation.
    By including these stakeholders the school is saying that they value their contribution and that they are prepared to listen to their views about the quality of teaching and learning.
    Many schools have a healthy representation of the parent voice already established.
    Much has been written of the importance of the pupil voice to inform improvement and strategies need to be in place to do this in an authentic, democratic and age appropriate way.
    The key to the process of including these stakeholders is not just allowing the voices to be heard but to be acted upon.
    Parents and students can be consulted in the very early stages of the process when data is being gathered.
    Parents: Parent forums/focus groups, working group of parents to seek views of other parents, parents evening/parent teacher meeting, short surveys.
    Students: Questionnaires/ focus groups, student council.
    Possible sources of information for evaluating teaching and learning – 
    In the early stages of SSE, schools may decide to analyse assessment data and records as a starting point. They should also gather information from pupils and parents to ensure that they have sufficient knowledge to make accurate judgements. Professional reflection and dialogue between teachers, focusing on specific aspects of teaching and learning, will be very important when gathering evidence. As collaborative practices are further developed among the teaching staff, team teaching, and professional collaborative review will become an effective means of gathering evidence.
    It is important to be clear about what information you are seeking and to limit the information-gathering to the collection of essential information – too much information can be counter productive.
    Presenters additional information
    Ref. Earl and Katz (2006) p.17
    Using Data for Informed decision making:
    1.develop an inquiry habit of mind (valuing deep understanding, reserving judgement with a tolerance for ambiguity and taking a range of perspectives and systematically posing increasingly focussed questions),
    2.become data literate (thinking about purpose, recognising sound and unsound data, becoming knowledgeable about statistical and measurement concepts, recognising other kinds of data, making interpretation paramount and paying attention to reporting and audiences)
    3.create a culture of inquiry in their school community (involving others in interpreting and engaging with the data, stimulating an internal sense of ’urgency’, making time and using critical friends)
    We use data to:
    •Discover issues
    •Diagnose situations
    •Forecast future conditions
    •Improve policy and Practice
    •Evaluate Effectiveness
    •Promote Accountability
  • This slide shows suggested forms of evidence that could be gathered under the 3 themes
  • Click 1 – step 2 When evidence has been gathered, schools will need to decide how to record and analyse their findings.
    Click 2, 3 & 4 - Questions such as “what is this evidence telling us” and “why is that so” will be useful in analysing this information. Further information on data analysis will be addressed in the workshop after break
    Click 5 –Not only does Step 2 involve analysing the information gathered but also recommends that this information be benchmarked against standards for the aspects of practice being evaluated. Evaluation criteria are available for each in Chapter 4 for this purpose. this ensures that the evaluation is as objective as possible. This leads us into step 3
    senter’s Notes
    Important to mediate to the participants that it is vital to spend time interrogating your evidence. It is important when the data is being analysed, that conclusions are drawn from evidence and not from preconceptions. It is important that the data be compared and benchmarked. A recommended way of doing this is by using the evaluation criteria in chapter 4
  • It is important, when engaging in self-evaluation, that schools arrive at sound and realistic evaluative judgements about the quality of the education they provide. Having gathered all the necessary evidence, the school will need to draw conclusions about the quality of learner outcomes and the quality of teaching and learning practices so that areas for improvement can be identified. An important requirement for arriving at sound and realistic evaluative judgements is the consistent use of valid benchmarks against which to judge quality.
     
    To assist schools in this regard, exemplar quality statements for each evaluation sub-theme are presented alongside the evaluation criteria. The quality statements are exemplars which describe schools with significant strengths in the context of each theme. Schools can use these statements as a benchmark against which to judge their own performance and to determine their strengths and if there are aspects of their work that need to be improved or developed.
    Ask participants to open page 30 of the Guidelines at this stage. The evaluation criteria are presented in bullet point form to enable schools to check what is important and what quality means in each of the sub-themes. The quality statements are presented in narrative form and describe a school that has reached a high standard in each sub-theme. They are presented side-by-side so that schools can use either or both when examining their own practice and making judgements about the quality of their performance.
     
    The quality statements describe schools that have reached the highest level of performance. While it is desirable that schools aspire to this level, many schools will have a range of strengths and will have attained an acceptable standard without reaching the highest level.
     
    The evaluation criteria and the quality statements will assist schools in making judgements. Based on the information or evidence gathered, schools should indicate, in the context of the evaluation sub-theme, whether:
     
    There are significant strengths
    Strengths outweigh weaknesses
    Weaknesses outweigh strengths
    There are significant weaknesses.
    It may become necessary to gather more relevant data before moving forward. Be aware that steps 1-3 may involve a little bit of fluidity…i.e. moving forward and back between steps 1, 2 and 3
    Additional notes for presenters:
    There is a definition of the above in Incidental Inspection Findings 2010 p 3 with a similar grid. There is also a similar quality continuum in Incidental Inspection findings 2010 p 3. Significant strengths = very good practice, very good learning. Strengths outweigh weaknesses = competent practice/good learning. Weaknesses outweigh strengths = fair, scope for development. Significant weaknesses = poor, experiencing significant difficulty.
  • Ask participants to open P 63 of the Guidelines
    Step 4 ensures that schools keep a record of their self-evaluation and particularly of the findings. The school self-evaluation report provides a basis for discussion and reflection amongst teachers, management and others in relation to the work of the school. It may be used by boards of management as an important information source in reporting to parents on the work of the school. It will provide a basis upon which school improvement targets can be developed and a school improvement plan agreed.
     
    The school self-evaluation process is not about paper work and schools should keep this in mind when recording their findings. Reports should be no more than 2/3 pages. They should record:
    Aspects of practice chosen for self-evaluation
    A brief account of the school context
    The findings
    Progression made on previous improvement targets
    A summary of strengths (affirm and celebrate)
    A summary of areas requiring improvement
    Legislative and regulatory requirements to be addressed.
     
    Schools should provide a summary report to the whole school community. Such a report will be very short and will provide details of the findings with regard to the strengths identified and the areas the school intends to prioritise for improvement. The summary report will list the strengths of the school and the priorities it has set for development. The purpose of sharing with the wider community is not only to indicate where the school is doing well and where there are areas for improvement but it is essentially saying – we have dug deep, we have reflected, we have asked your opinion, we have listened and we are committed to making improvements based on this….
    The primary focus of school self-evaluation should not be on the written work. Nonetheless, schools should complete a concise school self-evaluation report. This report should be no more than two or three pages long. A school self-evaluation report sets out the school’s evidence-based evaluative judgements about its strengths and the areas of its work requiring improvement. Those evaluative judgements or findings are used by the school to inform the school improvement plan and specifically, the improvement targets contained in that plan.
      
    The school self-evaluation report serves a number of functions:
     
    It indicates how a school has fulfilled the requirement to evaluate its performance annually
    It provides a basis for discussion and reflection among teachers, management, patron/ trustees and others in relation to the work of the school
    It can be used by boards of management as an important information source in reporting to parents and the patron/trustees on the work of the school as required under the Education Act 1998
    It provides a basis upon which a school improvement plan can be devised and specific school improvement targets set
    It can inform external evaluations undertaken by the Inspectorate.
     
    The way in which the school self-evaluation report is written impacts on its usefulness in the context of any of the above functions. The language of the report should be clear, specific and accessible.
     
  • Ask participants to open p 68 of guidelines.
    School self-evaluation should result in action towards improvement
    The setting of specific targets is the starting point of action for improvement.
    Having baseline information about where the school is at in relation to the areas selected for the evaluation means that the school can set specific, measurable, attainable, realistic and time bound (SMART) targets to bring about improvement.  
     
    In Step 5, schools will devise school improvement plan outlining the actions to be implemented over a three-year period. A template for this purpose is provided on p 68
     
    The plan will contain:
    A summary of strengths and areas for improvement
    Targets for improvement with a focus on learner outcomes
    Actions required to achieve the targets
    Reference to those who are responsible for undertaking actions, for example teachers or particular groups
    A statement of how schools will check if the targets have been achieved
    A timeframe for the achievement of the targets.
     
    The school improvement plan should be no more than one/two pages long. A short summary of the improvement plan should be provided to the whole school community.
    The sharing of a sort summary of the SSE report and the SIP is a way of not only sharing the information with the wider community but of saying that the school has listened to their views and has made efforts to put an improvement plan in place based on these views. 
    Each school improvement plan becomes part of the developmental section of the whole school plan.
  • NB Stress at this point that any targets devised are open to adjustment and refinement. Targes do no remain static and need to be reviewed during the monitoring stage. A useful acronym here is RAAR ( Review, Ammend, Adjust,Refine)
    Click 1 - Step 6, the final step, is vital if the SSE process is to bring about improvement. It is only when the actions in the improvement plan are implemented that the work of the school can improve. Highlights the point of SSE not being just an exercise of review
    All relevant school personnel should be aware of the actions to be implemented at individual teacher, class, or whole-school level. These actions should become part of the normal teaching and learning process.
     
    Click 2 - Actions must be monitored. Schools will need to decide:
    How monitoring will occur?
    Who will be responsible for monitoring?
    How progress will be determined and reported
    When progress will be reported (for example, at staff meetings, planning meetings, board meetings)
    If targets and actions are realistic or need to be changed.
     
    The role of the principal, deputy principal and teachers in the on-going and systematic monitoring of the implementation of the plan is important. In this regard, the gathering and use of information at specified intervals to check if the required improvements are being made is necessary. The implementation of the school improvement plan ultimately leads to a new cycle of school self-evaluation.
    Click 3 – It is very important to build in time for monitoring and review which allows for adjustments to be made and ensures SSE is a living process
    SSE is part of SDP & many schools already have structures in place for this
    Staff meetings
    Subject department meetings
    Part of normal classroom practice
    Croke Park Hours
  • To recap:
    Open guidelines on page 14 and 15. We have just worked through the 6 step process. Figures 2.1 and 2.2 contain the same process. Looking at the linear process on page 15, we can visually see the focus which is the what is the horizontal direction and the direction which is the how (the 6 step process) is the vertical.
    Themes provide the focus for improving learning and teaching and the process provides the direction for school self-evaluation.
    The first three steps outline the review element of the SDP process. These important steps ensure that conclusions about strengths and areas for improvement are based on evidence from a range of relevant sources. The next steps ensure that schools retain a record of the evaluation and describe the actions for improvement. The final step, implement and monitor, takes place over a three-year period.
    During our explanation of the 6 step process you will have noticed themes being outlined. These are a key part of the school self-evaluation quality framework for teaching and learning. The framework outlines themes and sub-themes to enable schools to evaluate teaching and learning in a systematic and coherent way.
  • PRESENTER NOTES:
    We would also like to make a few short points about the importance of inclusion as part of the SSE process. When looking through the evaluation criteria for all themes it is evident that inclusion and differentiation play an important role and need to be duly considered during the SSE process.
    Inclusion
    In planning for school self-evaluation the fundamental principles of the inclusive schools as proposed in international practices (Salamanca Statement, council of Europe, Political declaration and Action Plan), is that ‘all students should learn together where possible, and that ordinary schools must recognise and respond to diverse needs of their students whilst also having a continuum of support to meet those needs’.
    Differentiation
    How do teachers provide for learning and teaching? They ‘differentiate’ to cater for the needs of their students
    Team Teaching
    Through Team Teaching, teachers can organize their way of working to facilitate inclusion of al learners
  • This is a clip from on of the twelve pilot schools with whom the Inspectorate worked during last year as they engaged with the draft guidelines. This is their story….
  • PRESENTER NOTES:
    Presenter should strongly encourage the principals to discuss and share their experiences in this regard.
    Having considered the framework and the 6 step approach where do you think you and your school are in terms of SSE….
    What are the review practices already in existence in your school?
    Perhaps you have begun the process of SSE. If so what stage in the process would you say you are at?
    Perhaps you are considering how to get started.
    If some of the post-it questions are relevant at this point then they can be addressed here.
  • Bring participants to pg 13 – principles of SSE table 2.1 – give time for participants to read these. Elicit feedback as to what important messages are emerging from this table regarding SSE in schools. Synopsis with key messages we have taken and transferred to slide.
  • Before break we outlined the T&L Framework for SSE which provides a focus for schools and the 6 step process which provides a direction for that focus.
    This session will provide you with an opportunity to engage in the 6 step process through the lens of literacy using real data gathered from a real school.
    We will also highlight specific aspects of data analysis and target setting following feedback from our work last year with schools and in response to the needs of the SSE process.
    Consequently we will address these as you work through the example we provide.
  • Remind participants that the focus is on literacy. Remind participants of definition from L&N strategy (2011)
  • Provide participants with background information regarding sample school
    - Trusteeship
    Size – number teachers
    Urban
    DEIS/non DEIS
    Give a synopsis of how and what this school has done to date in relation to the early stages of the SSE process. It is not intended to present the “perfect package” of collected data. This is one school’s effort to start the process. Every school will be different.
    This school carried out
    A staff reflection scanning Fig 3.3.
    From this the staff chose subthemes that stood out as ones that needed more evidence – to highlight strengths and areas for improvement
    The substhemes chosen were attainment in curriculum objectives (literacy), engagement in learning and teaching approaches. Please note, it just so happens that this particular school chose one subtheme for each of the 3 themes.
    This may not always be the case. It is recommended that schools begin with outcomes i.e. attainment in curiculum objectives. A school may just choose 1-2 other subthemes based on their evidence.
  • The school has a culture of professional development.
    One of the teachers recently completed the Toraíocht leadership programme and her chosen topic was literacy & the new junior cycle.
    As part of her project she formed a literacy core team and they all tried out four comprehension strategies.
    She then asked the core team to reflect on what worked well in their subject.
    This year the core team will use Croke Park hours to train the rest of the staff in the use of comprehension strategies.
  • Just to remind you, this school carried out a staff reflection scanning Fig 3.3. and teaching framework.
    Click 2 - From this the staff chose themes and subthemes that stood out as ones that need more evidence – to highlight strengths and areas for improvement
    Click 3 –The subthemes chosen were
    attainment in curriculum objectives (outcome)
    engagement in learning (learner experience)
    teaching approaches. (teacher practice)
    Click 4 - this is the analysing evidence step. We are now going to actively engage in analysing this school’s evidence
  • The main questions driving data collection are “What do you want to find out?” “What do you need more information about?
    PRESENTER NOTES:
    This table details for us what our sample school looked at in regards to the process – themes (row 1), sub themes (row 2) and specific criteria identified in row 3 which resulted in the school asking more specific questions. The last row indicates the tools used under each theme
    Direct participants to page 40 of Guidelines for the evaluation criteria for teaching approaches and explain that the questions in this example were informed by scanning the evaluation criteria for teaching approaches.
    For second example direct participants to page 30 Evaluation criteria for outcomes.
    Remind participants - the subthemes selected for evaluation and the nature of each will strongly determine the kind of information schools decide to gather, the data collection instruments they use and the questions posed.
    Tell participants that before we embark on the activity, we would like to say a few words on data analysis as our experience/conversations with schools who have begun this process indicates that challenges are being encountered here.
    A key feature of effective SSE is the gathering of evidence towards enabling a school to
    Ascertain the extent to which it provides quality teaching and learning,
    Identify its strengths and areas for improvement
    Make sound judgements against quality statements
    Set targets which reflect where the school is currently at in a range of aspects of teaching and learning
    This means that schools need to move from being data-rich to being information-rich and knowledge-rich in relation to their current reality. The benefits come from “getting to know “ data as part of an ongoing process of school improvement and using it to investigate real issues in our schools and as a way of deciding what to do next.
    NB Meaning is brought to data through the human act of interpretation so asking questions such as what does this data tell us, what does it not tell us, what else do we need to know etc allows us to interpret what we have and what direction we need to take next.
    ‘The learning occurs in the dissonance and in coming to understand how and what others are thinking’ (Earl and Katx 2006 pg xiv)
    Standardised test results have the potential to yield a range of insights on student outcomes
    For example:
    It’s important to know how your school compares with national norms and
    if that has changed in recent times. If so why might this be the case? (Note where there are less that 10 pupils per class the reliability of the data is reduced. How are your pupils doing over time? Tracking data for the same students gives a lot of information about how pupils cope with the expanding curriculum and also how they engage with the assessment process. (This has implications for how schools manage feedback to pupils regarding standardised tests-in particular where results of tests are now being communicated to parents)
    If you have particular profiles of pupils how do they compare to the rest? E.g EAL students, exceptionally able, SEN and so on
    If you have particular approaches for literacy or numeracy in your school do you know how these approaches impact on pupils outcomes? What happens to this impact over time? This is particularly important to explore when pupils experience an approach for a limited timeframe e.g. Paired reading? It is important to critically engage with what we are using in our schools.
    Compare pupils performance on standardised tests to other ability tests e.g. CAT test
  • Open pg 25 of the Guidelines. Here we see an overview of good practice in the three quality themes (Figure 3.3) which may be useful for general reflection on teaching and learning. These should be scanned (collaboratively) towards broadly drawing attention to areas where the school is performing well/ could be performing better.
    In our sample school this process was completed during a Croke Park staff session in subject department groups first and feedback was given at the next staff meeting.
    The staff worked in pairs and recorded what they thought were the main strengths & areas for improvement on the staff reflection sheet (P. 83 guidelines)
    The literacy core team then collated the feedback
  • This school does not require students to sit an entrance assessment before they come into the school.
    Students sit a reading age and NRIT assessment during the first week of September.
    However this practice is under review in light of recommendations for the DES.
    Consequently there was not reliable baseline data available so the principal was advised to request the report cards & standardised test results from the primary school.
    There are 20 feeder schools so the principal, deputy and career guidance teacher targeted these schools to ensure all information was transferred as per circular 0056/2011.
    Within one week all school had sent in the standardised test results and report cards.
    A large number of schools had used the NCCA report card template.
    The school had decided it was going to start the SSE of literacy so they concentrated on the data that was relevant to this i.e. the STen for reading and the accompanying comments
  • The career guidance counsellor collated the STen scores for reading and put them into a bar chart.
    PDST has also developed a tool to insert this data to generate a cumulative frequency curve, so a school may compare their scores to the national norms.
    This may then be show to staff so that they will know the profile of the cohort so that realistic targets for attainment in state exams may be set.
    This information could also be used to track students performance in class based test.
    It could also be used to target different groups.
  • The profile of the school is above the national norms for reading.
    The main feeder school has the most disadvantaged students with some of the lowest scores.
    The school are going to make better links with this school for Irish, English & Maths for 1st year and 6th class teachers
  • Many principals ask us what are the best assessment tools.
    We gave a presentation at our last workshops and a summary of best practice in relation to standardised testing in PP schools will be available on the website.
    This school is going to review its assessment policy
  • Subject department may now access tools to analyse results from the PDST website for all Junior Certificate and Leaving Certificate subjects.
    The word document incorporates a section for how the subject department will support the acquisition of literacy skills and the targets for attainment in the subject.
  • During the staff reflection the general consensus among staff was that the school was strong in relation to attainment in state exams.
    However the data suggests that while the numbers achieving honours grades are in line with the national norms, the numbers taking Higher Level are lower.
    This may be similar for other subjects as well, so subjects departments may need to analyse their results in more detail using their own tools or the ones available on the PDST website.
  • A scan of the available report cards showed that writing may be an area that needs to be looked at.
  • Each subject department was asked about their expectations for student’s written work and if there were any problems with writing in their subject.
    SEC chief examiners reports were used to help teachers identify the key areas for writing across the curriculum.
  • Subject departments compiled their own sample editing checklist. The literacy link team collated the suggestions & then a common editing checklist was devised and used to evaluate a sample of students work.
  • A sample of students work was taken up from a range of subjects.
    There are five first year classes and they are mixed ability so work from one class was analysed
    Work from the sampled students will be evaluated again after the intervention has been implemented for a period of time to see did the self- editing checklist that will be implemented work.
  • It is evident from the chart that there are recurring problems that might be addressed with an editing checklist.
    Targets to improve outcomes in writing may be set based on this information.
  • A student survey was comiled by the literacy core team based on the evaluation criteria in the guidelines.
    Each subtheme was scanned to see what questions were relevant to the school context.
    The questions asked were broad enough to gather information on reading, writing, oral language & digital literacy as well as a students’s learning experience.
    It was decided to collect all of the data together & analyse it as required.
    147 students completed the survey on-line in less that one hour & results were colated immediatedly using google forms.
  • The results from the survy also highlighted that writing may need to be improved.
  • These were the findings from the student questionnaire
  • Based on the anlalysis of the evidence to date a teachers survey was complied by the core team. Feedback was taken from a focus groupof teachers before an amended survey was administered to staff.
    The evaluation criteria in the guidelines were used to ensure that the questions were focused & relevant.
    The link to the survey was put on 4 pc’s in the staffroom & 33/45 teachers filled in the survey. It took on average 2 minutes to answer & submit the survey.
    All staff were gieven a copy of the student & teacher survey.
  • Sample findings from the teacher survey
  • Strengths and priorities for improvement as identified from the analysis of the teachers survey.
  • Please allow this activity AND the feedback ALL the time that they need
    This is THE most important part of the seminar and warrants time and discussion. Please do NOT rush the activity OR the feedback.
    There are 4 pieces of data that the participants need to analyse
    In groups of 8 give each pair one piece of data to analyse & record the strengths & areas for improvement in the diagnostic window
    Then rotate the data clockwise and repeat the process
    Each participant gets an overview of all of the data.
  • The next stage in the process (step 3) is about drawing conclusion based on the analysed data. This data will have presented both strengths and areas for improvement. These 2 lists are important. Ask
    Are there predominantly strengths?
    Are there predominantly weaknesses?
    Is the school somewhere in between but
    Do strengths outweigh weaknesses OR
    Do weaknesses outweigh strengths
    Remind participants that it is very important for schools to affirm and celebrate the identified strengths.
    Acknowledge the areas that should be prioritised for improvement.
    Give participants a chance in their groups to discuss what conclusion might be drawn from the aggregated strengths/areas for improvements. Groups can plot themselves along continuum according to each subtheme.
    PRESENTER NOTES:
    Once the flipchart represents a number of strengths and areas for improvement for each of the three selected subthemes, ask each group to refer to relevant evaluation criteria/quality statement for each of the three subthemes. This should be helpful in guiding a school to benchmark where the school is at in relation to the various aspects
    Remind participants that the quality statements illustrate the highest level of practice. Schools may have considerable strengths without reaching this level.
    Give participants a chance in their groups to discuss what conclusion might be drawn from the aggregated strengths/areas for improvements. Ask groups to draw a conclusion to where they think this school is at along the continuum. Suggest that the narrative quality statement might be useful for drawing this overall conclusion. This is not an exact science so no need to dwell on it!
  • Take feedback from each group on each of the three subthemes
    On the flip chart write
    Outcomes
    Strengths Weaknesses
    Repeat the process for each theme
  • Note to presenter: Hand out completed SSE report to each group.
    We are now at stage 4 of the SSE process where the findings are transferred into the SSE report.
    Draw attention to:
    Section 1 = Focus of evaluation & context etc.
    Section 2 = List of the findings with reference to the aspects of the subthemes selected
    Section 3 = This will not apply until year 2 of the process
    Section 4 = Strengths, areas for improvement and legislative/regulatory requirements
  • As per previous slide
  • Please flag up this before addressing targets- it is important for participants to see that we are on step 5
    The banner at the top clearly shows targets as an integral part of the SIP
  • The guidelines say that ……. Read the slide
    So this relates directly to the SSE framework for teaching and learning (also on next slide) – the themes and sub-themes relate directly to pupil achievement, knowledge, skills and attitudes.
    Additional presenter information :
    Targets are measures of indicators of what the individual school wants to achieve in terms of improvement in performance (Northern Ire.)
    A target is a quantifiable performance level or change in
    performance level to be attained within a specified time (Australia).
    Targets provide a goal. The success of improvement strategies can be
    measured against them, and they can help raise a board’s and it’s
    community’s expectations of what can be achieved. (Ontario)
  • Please bring participants to page 61 and ask them to read the first paragraph to themselves
    You are familiar with the acronym SMART for targets.
    Specific : Try to describe the intended effect of your improvement planning in as SMART a way as is feasible.
    What specific learning outcomes do you anticipate might result from your plan?
    NB : How will things be different? What will students/teachers be doing at the end of the timeframe that they are not doing now?
    Measurable Is there any manageable way to measure these outcomes-before, during and after you implement aspects of your plan?
    Attainable : Targets need to allow for a range of factors unique to context, ability levels, resources etc
    Realistic : Targets should be demanding in the sense that we raise the bar of expectation for our students to reach their full potential. At the same time targets should be realistic in that they reflect the ability and needs of our students and are achievable within the context of our school – resources, personnel and expenditure.
    Allow for a timeframe that supports key actions to become established and for reflection and learning to happen in line with planned actions.
    This is very important. The quality of collaborative reflection on the planned actions, allowing for honest professional dialogue to develop means it is the actions that are the high focus aspect of the SIP.
    Timed When targets are being set it is ESSENTIAL that the monitoring and review schedule is attached in terms of time and personnel involved. Each action must have a timeframe.
    NB : Having shared ownership of targets generates investment into the planned actions by teachers. A collective commitment to school improvement increases the chances of success.
    The danger with setting targets and actions is that they end up in a file locked away and are only looked at when the paperwork needs to be reviewed. As targets are being set for a three year period they may need to be reviewed in light of being too ambitious, not challenging enough and will therefore indicate a need to change direction for a specific part of the SIP.
    These reviews could be put on the agenda for future staff meetings / Croke park meetings etc. Dates for these meetings are usually set out for the year in advance and therefore putting these reviews on the agenda from the beginning may help in their implementation.
  • It is important that specific, measureable, attainable, realistic and timed , targets are set.
    Using this type of language when setting targets is recommended
  • The layout of this formula (which aspect comes first) can and will vary but it’s important that all aspects of the formula are included.
    Verb / thing effected/ from (baseline) / to (level intended) / by (date)
    It s helpful to break the target up per year rather than having one target for the entire 3 year period
    THE FOLLOWING ARE THE ONES IN THE GUIDELINES
    X% of our junior cycle students have a positive disposition to reading. We will increase this to X+15% over the three-year period of this school plan
    X% of our students is taking higher-level English for Junior Certificate. We will increase this to X +10% over the three year period of this school improvement plan.
  • Targets are nested within the broader framework of baseline data, actions and success criteria in the SIP. Targets are inextricably linked to baseline data, key appropriate success criteria and actions.
    Baseline is a measure of pupils outcomes or learning experiences before the actions are implemented – it is the starting point. Without this you cannot set an appropriate target.
    Actions – what the school, teacher or pupil will do to achieve the intended achievement or outcome as outlined in the target. A target is pointless unless it is attached to appropriate action. Targets alone do not bring about improvement unless they are acted on-
    If the targets are THE focus of the SIP without appropriate support for action, a professional vacuum can develop. Teachers will feel that reaching targets is what matters not the professional learning that happens as the plan is implemented.)
    Success criteria are the measurable outcomes of the targets- how we will know if they have been achieved. They are the observable milestones which demonstrate what teachers/pupils are doing differently. Success criteria are established and linked to the target and can be very helpful during while monitoring the implementation of the target – they can provide signals to indicate whether or not things are on track.
  • As per previous slide
  • Distribute sample SIP with summary of strengths and areas for improvement already completed. Ask groups to choose one area for improvement and using the baseline data (gleaned from the SSE report), set ONE target, required actions and success criteria (measurable outcomes or observable milestones along the way).
    This SIP on the slide is the one in the guidelines. The hand-out version is a modified PDST version. Schools can adapt these.
  • NB Stress at this point that any targets devised are open to adjustment and refinement. Targets do no remain static and need to be reviewed during the monitoring stage. A useful acronym here is RAAR ( Review, Ammend, Adjust,Refine)
    Click 1 - Step 6, the final step, is vital if the SSE process is to bring about improvement. It is only when the actions in the improvement plan are implemented that the work of the school can improve. All relevant school personnel should be aware of the actions to be implemented at individual teacher, class, or whole-school level. These actions should become part of the normal teaching and learning process.
     
    Click 2 - Actions must be monitored. Schools will need to decide:
    How monitoring will occur?
    Who will be responsible for monitoring?
    How progress will be determined and reported
    When progress will be reported (for example, at staff meetings, planning meetings, board meetings)
    If targets and actions are realistic or need to be changed.
     
    The role of the principal, deputy principal and teachers in the ongoing and systematic monitoring of the implementation of the plan is important. In this regard, the gathering and use of information at specified intervals to check if the required improvements are being made is necessary. The implementation of the school improvement plan ultimately leads to a new cycle of school self-evaluation.
    Click 3 – It is very important to build in time for monitoring and review which allows for adjustments to be made and ensures SSE is a living process
  • This is a clip from on of the twelve pilot schools with whom the Inspectorate worked during last year as they engaged with the draft guidelines. This is their story….
  • Bring participants to pg 13 – principles of SSE table 2.1 – give time for participants to read these. Elicit feedback as to what important messages are emerging from this table regarding SSE in schools. Synopsis with key messages we have taken and transferred to slide.
  • Before lunch you had an opportunity to experience the 6 step SSE process through the lens of literacy using real data from a school. In this session you will have another chance to experience in the context of Numeracy using data we gathered from a school.
    Before we finish and in light of all you have heard today , we want to give you time to take stock of your own situation and reflect on what your next steps might be when you return to school
  • Remind them that the focus is on numeracy. Remind participants of definition from L&N strategy (2011)
  • Provide participants with background information regarding sample school
    Size – number of students/teachers
    Urban
    DEIS
    EAL students
    Programmes in the school
    Give a synopsis of how and what this school has done to date in relation to the early stages of the SSE process. It is not intended to present you with the “perfect package” of collected data. This is one school’s effort to start the process. Every school will be different.
    This school carried out
    A staff reflection scanning Fig 3.3.
    From this the staff chose subthemes that stood out as ones that need more evidence – to highlight strengths and areas for improvement
    The substhemes chosen were attainment in curriculum objectives (literacy), engagement in learning and teaching approaches. Please note, it just so happens that this particular school chose one subtheme for each of the 3 themes. This may not always be the case. It is recommended that begin with outcomes i.e. attainment in curiculum objectives. A school may just choose 1-2 other subthemes based on their evidence.
  • Click 1 – picture. We are now going back to one school’s story so far.
    Just to remind you, this school carried out a staff reflection scanning Fig 3.3. and teaching framework.
    Click 2 - From this the staff chose themes and subthemes that stood out as ones that need more evidence – to highlight strengths and areas for improvement
    Click 3 –The subthemes chosen were
    attainment in curriculum objectives (outcome)
    engagement in learning (learner exp)
    Assessment (teacher practice)
    Click 4 - this is the analysing evidence step. We are now going to actively engage in analysing this school’s evidence
  • The main questions driving data collection are “What do you want to find out?” “What do you need more information about?
    PRESENTER NOTES:
    This table details for us what our sample school looked at in regards to the process – themes (row 1), sub themes (row 2) and specific criteria identified in row 3 which resulted in the school asking more specific questions. The last row indicates under theme the tools used
    Direct participants to page 40 of Guidelines for the evaluation criteria for teaching approaches and explain that the questions in this example were informed by scanning the evaluation criteria for teaching approaches.
    For second example direct participants to page 30 Evaluation criteria for outcomes.
    Remind participants - the subthemes selected for evaluation and the nature of each will strongly determine the kind of information schools decide to gather, the data collection instruments they use and the questions posed.
    Tell participants that before we embark on the activity, we would like to say a few words on data analysis as our experience/conversations with schools who have begun this process indicates that challenges are being encountered here.
    A key feature of effective SSE is the gathering of evidence towards enabling a school to
    Ascertain the extent to which it provides quality teaching and learning,
    Identify its strengths and areas for improvement
    make sound judgements against quality statements
    Set targets which reflect where the school is currently at in a range of aspects of teaching and learning
    This means that schools need to move from being data-rich to being information-rich and knowledge-rich in relation to their current reality. The benefits come from “getting to know “ data as part of an ongoing process of school improvement and using it to investigate real issues in our schools and as a way of deciding what to do next.
    NB Meaning is brought to data through the human act of interpretation so asking questions such as what does this data tell us, what does it not tell us, what else do we need to know etc allows us to interpret what we have and what direction we need to take next.
    ‘The learning occurs in the dissonance and in coming to understand how and what others are thinking’ (Earl and Katx 2006 pg xiv)
    Standardised test results have the potential to yield a range of insights on student outcomes
    For example:
    It’s important to know how your school compares with national norms and
    if that has changed in recent times. If so why might this be the case? (Note where there are less that 10 pupils per class the reliability of the data is reduced. How are your pupils doing over time? Tracking data for the same students gives a lot of information about how pupils cope with the expanding curriculum and also how they engage with the assessment process. (This has implications for how schools manage feedback to pupils regarding standardised tests-in particular where results of tests are now being communicated to parents)
    If you have particular profiles of pupils how do they compare to the rest? E.g EAL students, exceptionally able, SEN and so on
    If you have particular approaches for literacy or numeracy in your school do you know how these approaches impact on pupils outcomes? What happens to this impact over time? This is particularly important to explore when pupils experience an approach for a limited timeframe e.g. Paired reading? It is important to critically engage with what we are using in our schools.
    Compare pupils performance on standardised tests to other ability tests e.g. CAT test
  • Open pg. 25 of the Guidelines. Here we see an overview of good practice in the three quality themes (Figure 3.3) which may be useful for general reflection on teaching and learning. These should be scanned (collaboratively) towards broadly drawing attention to areas where the school is performing well/ could be performing better
  • Analysis of the results of the Cognitive Abilities Test as administered to First Years
    See the PP on standardised test information to interpret the graph
  • The tool for analyisng CAT results is available on the PDST website
  • Option of using PDST tool for analysis purposes
  • During the staff reflection the general consensus among staff was that the school was strong in relation to attainment in state exams.
    However the data suggests that while the numbers achieving honours grades are in line with the national norms, the numbers taking HL are lower.
    This may be similar for other subjects as well, so subjects departments may need to analyse their results in more details using their own tools or the ones available on the PDST website.
  • These were the areas assessed in the criterion referenced test. It was felt by the numeracy team that the chart elements in blue were essential building blocks and that a proficiency target of 80% would be necessary for the cohort
    Chart elements in red were areas that were considered more difficult (higher order) and a proficiency target of 60% would be applicable for the cohort.
  • The numeracy questionnaire was administered to a one of the mixed ability classes
  • Strengths and areas for improvement ascertained from the numeracy questionnaire
  • Numeracy interview schedule that was used by subject departments (p.81)
    Answers were collated into one summary document
  • There are 4 pieces of data that the participants need to analyse
    In groups of 8 give each pair one piece of data to analyse & record the strengths & areas for improvement in the diagnostic window
    Then rotate the data clockwise and repeat the process
    Each participant gets an overview of all of the data.
    The participants will spend more time during this session looking at the report & SIP & will be asked to come up with their own targets and actions etc. so they will not spend as much time at this activity as they did with the literacy activity.
  • The next stage in the process (step 3) is about drawing conclusions based on the analysed data. This data will have presented both strengths and areas for improvement. These 2 lists are important. Ask
    Are there predominantly strengths?
    Are there predominantly weaknesses?
    Is the school somewhere in between but
    Do strengths outweigh weaknesses OR
    Do weaknesses outweigh strengths
    Remind participants that it is very important for schools to affirm and celebrate the identified strengths.
    Acknowledge the areas that should be prioritised for improvement.
    Give participants a chance in their groups to discuss what conclusion might be drawn from the aggregated strengths/areas for improvements. Groups can plot themselves along continuum according to each subtheme.
    PRESENTER NOTES:
    Once the flipchart represents a number of strengths and areas for improvement for each of the three selected subthemes, ask each group to refer to relevant evaluation criteria/quality statement for each of the three subthemes. This should be helpful in guiding a school to benchmark where the school is at in relation to the various aspects
    Remind participants that the quality statements illustrate the highest level of practice. Schools may have considerable strengths without reaching this level.
    Give participants a chance in their groups to discuss what conclusion might be drawn from the aggregated strengths/areas for improvements. Ask groups to draw a conclusion to where they think this school is at along the continuum. Suggest that the narrative quality statement might be useful for drawing this overall conclusion. This is not an exact science so no need to dwell on it!
  • Note to presenter:
    We are taking feedback here regarding Step 2 of the process. Take feedback from 1 or 2 random groups
    Click 1 - How manageable were the following; click the 3 questions on the slide
    What did your group record in your diagnostic window?
    How manageable was it for your group to identify the associated themes/subthemes?
    How effective was the comparison activity involving your findings and the evaluation criteria/quality statement of the subtheme?
  • Step 4 ensures that schools keep a record of their self-evaluation and particularly of the findings. The school self-evaluation report provides a basis for discussion and reflection amongst teachers, management and others in relation to the work of the school. It may be used by boards of management as an important information source in reporting to parents on the work of the school. It will provide a basis upon which school improvement targets can be developed and a school improvement plan agreed.
     
    Ask participants to open P 55/56/57 of the Guidelines
    The school self-evaluation process is not about paper work and schools should keep this in mind when recording their findings. Reports should be no more than 2/3 pages. They should record:
    Aspects of practice chosen for self-evaluation
    A brief account of the school context
    The findings
    Progression made on previous improvement targets
    A summary of strengths (affirm and celebrate)
    A summary of areas requiring improvement
    Legislative and regulatory requirements to be addressed.
     
    Schools should provide a summary report to the whole school community. Such a report will be very short and will provide details of the findings with regard to the strengths identified and the areas the school intends to prioritise for improvement. The summary report will list the strengths of the school and the priorities it has set for development. The purpose of sharing with the wider community is not only to indicate where the school is doing well and where there are areas for improvement but it is essentially saying – we have dug deep, we have reflected, we have asked your opinion, we have listened and we are committed to making improvements based on this….
    The primary focus of school self-evaluation should not be on the written work. Nonetheless, schools should complete a concise school self-evaluation report. This report should be no more than two or three pages long. A school self-evaluation report sets out the school’s evidence-based evaluative judgements about its strengths and the areas of its work requiring improvement. Those evaluative judgements or findings are used by the school to inform the school improvement plan and specifically, the improvement targets contained in that plan.
      
    The school self-evaluation report serves a number of functions:
     
    It indicates how a school has fulfilled the requirement to evaluate its performance annually
    It provides a basis for discussion and reflection among teachers, management, patron/ trustees and others in relation to the work of the school
    It can be used by boards of management as an important information source in reporting to parents and the patron/trustees on the work of the school as required under the Education Act 1998
    It provides a basis upon which a school improvement plan can be devised and specific school improvement targets set
    It can inform external evaluations undertaken by the Inspectorate.
     
    The way in which the school self-evaluation report is written impacts on its usefulness in the context of any of the above functions. The language of the report should be clear, specific and accessible.
     
    Presenters Extra Notes
    A school self-evaluation report sets out the school’s evidence-based evaluative judgements about its strengths and the areas of its work requiring improvement. Those evaluative judgements or findings are used by the school to inform the school improvement plan and specifically, the improvement targets contained in that plan.
    The school self-evaluation report serves a number of functions:
    • It provides a basis for discussion and reflection among teachers, management and others in relation to the work of the school
    • It can be used by boards as an important information source in reporting to parents on the work of the school as required under the Education Act 1998
    • It provides a basis upon which a school improvement plan can be devised and specific school improvement targets set
    • It can inform external evaluations undertaken by the Inspectorate
    The way in which the school self-evaluation report is written impacts on its usefulness in the context of any of the above functions. The language of the report should be clear, specific and accessible.
  • Distribute sample SIP with summary of strengths and areas for improvement already completed. Ask groups to choose one area for improvement and using the baseline data (gleaned from the SSE report), set ONE target, required actions and success criteria (measurable outcomes or observable milestones along the way).
    This SIP on the slide is the one in the guidelines. The hand-out version is a modified PDST version. Schools can adapt these.
  • Distribute sample SIP with summary of strengths and areas for improvement already completed. Ask groups to choose one area for improvement and using the baseline data (gleaned from the SSE report), set ONE target, required actions and success criteria (measurable outcomes or observable milestones along the way).
    This SIP on the slide is the one in the guidelines. The hand-out version is a modified PDST version. Schools can adapt these.
  • NB Stress at this point that any targets devised are open to adjustment and refinement. Targets do no remain static and need to be reviewed during the monitoring stage. A useful acronym here is RAAR ( Review, Ammend, Adjust,Refine)
    Click 1 - Step 6, the final step, is vital if the SSE process is to bring about improvement. It is only when the actions in the improvement plan are implemented that the work of the school can improve. All relevant school personnel should be aware of the actions to be implemented at individual teacher, class, or whole-school level. These actions should become part of the normal teaching and learning process.
     
    Click 2 - Actions must be monitored. Schools will need to decide:
    How monitoring will occur?
    Who will be responsible for monitoring?
    How progress will be determined and reported
    When progress will be reported (for example, at staff meetings, planning meetings, board meetings)
    If targets and actions are realistic or need to be changed.
     
    The role of the principal, deputy principal and teachers in the ongoing and systematic monitoring of the implementation of the plan is important. In this regard, the gathering and use of information at specified intervals to check if the required improvements are being made is necessary. The implementation of the school improvement plan ultimately leads to a new cycle of school self-evaluation.
    Click 3 – It is very important to build in time for monitoring and review which allows for adjustments to be made and ensures SSE is a living process
  • Circular and A5 leaflet says :
    Experience has told us that it takes a number of years to build good self-evaluation processes in schools. Change will take time to become fully established and that teachers, principals and others involved will need to be supported. Over the next 4 years, schools are expected to evaluate literacy, numeracy and one other aspect of teaching and learning. Gaelscoileanna and scoileanna Gaeltachta engage in evaluation in Literacy L1 & L2 and Numeracy. You and your staff choose your focus after taking stock of what you already know about how your school is doing in these areas.
    A whole-school approach to the self-evaluation and improvement of literacy and numeracy should be adopted. Each subject department should put in place three-year improvement plans with targets to improve outcomes for students in the subject and to support and improve the acquisition of literacy and numeracy skills.
     
    Generally schools should engage in school self-evaluation of one or more aspects of teaching and learning across all subjects and programmes each year. However, it is acknowledged that the process may take more time in the early stages.
     
    Therefore over a four-year period from 2012, all post-primary schools should engage in robust school self-evaluation and produce three-year improvement plans for Mathematics and numeracy, literacy (English in English medium schools and Irish and English in Irish medium schools) and one or more aspects of teaching and learning across all subjects and programmes.
     
    The schedule below provides flexibility to schools in how they will achieve the national targets set out in the Literacy and Numeracy Strategy.
     
    Schedule of school self-evaluation in a post-primary school
     In the school year 2012/13, schools should start the process of self-evaluation. In that year they should select one of the following options: literacy, numeracy, one or more aspects of teaching and learning. In subsequent years, schools should select again from the above options so that, within the four-year period, a school self-evaluation report and a three-year school improvement plan for literacy, for numeracy and for one or more aspects of teaching and learning across all subjects will be completed.
     
    Each year the school should adopt a whole-school approach to improving the area selected for self-evaluation. Each subject department will:
     
    Engage in self-evaluation of the subject with a specific focus on the area selected
    Complete a school self-evaluation report that identifies strengths and areas for development in the area selected
    Complete a three-year school improvement plan for the area selected, which becomes one element of the school’s overall school improvement plan
    Begin implementation of this element of the school improvement plan
    Monitor the implementation of the element of the school improvement plan completed in the previous school year.
    Numeracy encompasses the ability to use mathematical understanding and skills to solve problems and meet the demands of day-to-day living in complex social settings
     
    Literacy includes the capacity to read, understand and critically appreciate various forms of communication including spoken language, printed text, broadcast media, and digital media. Literacy for learners in English-medium schools and settings should be understood primarily as literacy in English. In the case of Irish-medium schools, literacy should be understood as both Irish as the first language of the school and English.
     
    Irish medium schools should engage in self-evaluation of numeracy and Mathematics, Literacy in Irish and literacy in English over the first four-year period.
    SCHOOL SELF-EVALUATION IN DEIS SCHOOLS
     
    Schools within the DEIS programme have been required to develop and implement school improvement plans (called DEIS action plans) as part of the requirements for DEIS funding since 2006/07. The work required of schools in forming and implementing DEIS action plans is very similar to that required in the school self-evaluation process. With effect from the date of this circular, DEIS schools may meet the planning and reporting requirements for DEIS funding through completing the school self-evaluation process.
     
    Frequently, the action plans developed in DEIS schools have focused on the review and improvement of literacy and numeracy. In schools where thorough review and improvement planning for literacy and numeracy have already been completed and recorded, the school community will be focusing on monitoring and implementing the action plans developed to date. In such schools, the next stage of the school self-evaluation process may focus on teaching and learning in areas other than literacy and numeracy in the period 2012-16.
  • This is what is MIGHT look like
    3 separate plans but will be phased in and will be implemented concurrently
    NB This is a suggested outline for a school that begins with Literacy
  • Clip that highlights the benefits of SSE including advice to schools starting off
  • Note to presenter: Distribute hand out with prompts for reflection and give adequate time for principals to complete this.
    Possible questions for the presenter to help guide the reflection hand out:
    • What curricular areas will be the focus of school self-evaluation?
    • Why has this area been chosen?
    • When does the self-evaluation process occur?
    • Where in the self-evaluation quality framework for teaching and learning will we start? How will we use the evaluation criteria to support us
    in reviewing aspects of practice?
    • How will we gather the necessary evidence?
    • Who will be responsible?
    • How will we carry out the school self-evaluation
  • Revisit the post-its for questions/expectations chart
  • PRESENTER NOTES:
    SUPPORT FOR SCHOOL SELF-EVALUATION
     
    As per circular; In order to assist schools to engage in the process of school self-evaluation, a number of supports have been put in place.
     
    7.1Guidelines
    The Inspectorate has prepared guidelines to support the school self-evaluation process. School Self-Evaluation Guidelines for Primary Schools are available at www.schoolself-evaluation.ie.
     
    The Guidelines contain a framework for evaluating teaching and learning, along with evaluation criteria and quality statements to assist schools in making judgements about the quality of their own work. Sample tools to help schools gather evidence and make judgements are also included.
     
    A school self-evaluation report template and a school improvement plan template are provided in the Guidelines. A check list to assist schools in examining their adherence to legislative and statutory requirements is also included.
     
    The Department has also prepared An Introduction to School Self-Evaluation of Teaching and Learning in Primary Schools which is available at www.schoolself-evaluation.ie.
     
    7.2School support
    The Inspectorate and members of the Professional Development Service for Teachers (PDST) will provide support to schools in the area of school self-evaluation. The support is intended to assist schools in developing their understanding of school self-evaluation.
     
    In order to facilitate all teaching staff to attend support sessions, it is suggested that schools assign a portion of the additional time allocated under the Croke Park Agreement to school self-evaluation. This will enable presentations to be made and questions and queries to be answered within specific school contexts.
     
    It is planned that this support will be delivered to schools over the course of the school year 2012/13 and the school year 2013/14.
     
    7.3Online support
    Web-based support for school self-evaluation will also be provided. The range of online materials and support will be developed and will grow over time. The support will include:
     
    Electronic versions of the Guidelines, which include the quality framework, evaluation criteria, quality statements and tools, to enable schools to access the sections of relevance to their current needs
     
    PowerPoint presentations explaining the purpose and process of school self-evaluation, which may be useful to school leaders at staff or group meetings
     
    Short video clips to illustrate particular aspects of school self-evaluation
     
    Other school self-evaluation materials schools may wish to share.
    Evaluations, travel admin.
  • Stress here the importance of planning for evaluation- link it into what is already going on as part of the schools improvement agenda
    It needs to be part and parcel of what schools are doing on a day to day basis
    Allow time
    SSE is not designed to be a bolt on activity
    In order to own the process SSE must be built into a schools procedures
    Develop the SSE habit gradually - all school practice emerges over time so assess the readiness level of your school
    See it as a shared task – delegate – it needs to be a whole school approach anyway!
    Acknowledge your context, and the limitations it may present
  • SSE is not only about identifying areas for improvement in our practice – it places a premium on identifying what schools are doing well and asks schools to record, celebrate and share these successes with the school community. It affords schools an opportunity to speak for themselves.
    Efforts to improve are no longer based solely on hunches or casual conclusions. In identifying what needs to improve, schools can be confident that steps they are taking as a result of the evaluation are rooted in baseline evidence and can set sound targets towards improvement.
    SSE is in-keeping with a democratic system of school evaluation. Totally supportive of schools and teachers - gives them more control- to take the initiative in improving the quality if teaching and learning they provide and plot their own path in doing so. With SSE schools are trusted to take the lead and plot their own path to success . SSE allows schools to say what they are /are not happy with. Mac Beath views SSE as a process which allows schools and teachers opportunities to speak for themselves
    An added benefit of SSE is it inevitably presents schools with potential areas for CPD – this puts teachers at the centre of identifying their own CPD needs that are directly informed by the teaching and leaning needs of the pupils.
    Acknowledges the context of the school - there is no blueprint. SSE will look different according to each schools context and work are unique, but this process can be adapted to suit all school contexts to affirm and celebrate what they are doing well, to decide on changes they would like to make based on the evidence they have gathered and to report this to their school communities
    The 6 step approach and the T & L framework together provides a logical way for schools to reflect on and review practice, record their results and plan for future action. The framework provides a focus and the 6 steps provide direction.
    Collects a range of views and perspectives – ensures that all relevant stakeholder views are heard and are factored into plans for improvement.
    At the heart if SSE is improved learning outcomes and experiences for all pupils.
    Pilot schools reported that :
    –Teachers found the process beneficial
    –Principals found it enabled them to engage in a more professionally reflective manner with staff: guidelines provided the shared language
    –It enabled all voices to be heard
    –It provided evidence about what was working well and what needed to improve
    –SSE leads to improved outcomes for students
  • Bring participants to pg 13 – principles of SSE table 2.1 – give time for participants to read these. Elicit feedback as to what important messages are emerging from this table regarding SSE in schools. Synopsis with key messages we have taken and transferred to slide.
  • Post primary sse 15 november 2012

    1. 1. School Self-Evaluation Seminar for Post-Primary School Principals 2012 Session 1
    2. 2. Overview of seminar Session 1 9.15 – 11.00 SSE : Context and Rationale Introduction and overview of School Self-Evaluation Guidelines and 6 step process Reflection; where are we now? 11.00 – 11.15 Coffee Session 2 SSE through the lens of Literacy – working through the process Spotlight on Target Setting Reflection – The process in action 11.15 – 12.45 12.45 – 1.45 Lunch Session 3 SSE through the lens of Numeracy – working through the process Reflection; where to next? 1.45 – 3.15 The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    3. 3. Session 1 objectives • To introduce the School Self –Evaluation Guidelines for Post-Primary Schools • To provide a rationale for school self -evaluation • To set the context for school self-evaluation • To outline the school self-evaluation process The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    4. 4. Reflection.. What questions do you currently have about planning for and implementing the self - evaluation process in your school? The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    5. 5. What is in it for your school? The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    6. 6. School SelfEvaluation External Evaluation School Improvement The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    7. 7. A reframing of the SDP process 4. Implementation and monitoring 5. Evaluation Gather solid evidence Analyse it 1. Review Make judgements 3. Action Plan 2. Prioritise and set target(s) The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    8. 8. Introducing the Guidelines Click here to access on-line The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    9. 9. Key Messages • The primary purpose of school self-evaluation is to improve the quality of learner outcomes • School self-evaluation is an internal, reflective process of school review which requires schools to examine their practice honestly and critically • The gathering of evidence to justify and to inform action planning for improvement is a fundamental principle of school self-evaluation The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    10. 10. To summarise… The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    11. 11. Broad requirements • build on the existing SDP process • evaluate the quality of teaching and learning in literacy, numeracy and at least one other aspect of T & L over the four year period from 2012/13 to 2015/16 • write a short SSE report for the area examined • devise a SIP for aspects of practice identified for improvement in the area examined • First SIP to be in place by June 2013 • Each subject department to engage in self-evaluation with a specific focus on the area selected. The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    12. 12. The Teaching and Learning Quality Framework Theme Theme Teaching & Learning Learner outcomes Learning experiences The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013 Teachers’ practices 12
    13. 13. Getting started; using the teaching and learning framework Page 24 / 25
    14. 14. The Teaching and Learning Quality Framework Teaching & Learning Sub-themes Sub-themes Theme Theme Learner outcomes • Attainment of curriculum objectives Learning experiences •Learning environment •Engagement in learning •Learning to learn The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013 Teachers’ practices • • • • Preparation for teaching Teaching approaches Management of students Assessment 14
    15. 15. Towards the Six-Step Process : a recap  Engage in collaborative staff reflection using Fig 3.3 P. 25  Consider questions on pg. 12 to guide discussion  Consult readily available assessment records and results of standardised tests  Select subthemes to be evaluated using the evaluation criteria (Chapter 4)  Begin the six-step school self-evaluation process through the lens of the subthemes selected The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    16. 16. Key steps in the SSE Process The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    17. 17. Considerations Mixture of data Triangulation of data • Quantitative • Qualitative Gather enough that is relevant and sufficiently informs the line of enquiry in order to avoid overload and facilitate effective analysis
    18. 18. The Teaching and Learning Quality Framework Theme Theme Learner outcomes Evidence Evidence Teaching & Learning Learning experiences Standardised/ STen scores, CAT, SEC, copies, class tests, attitudinal survey •Questionnaires •Learning log •Observation The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013 Teachers’ practices • Focus group • Questionnaires 18
    19. 19. • What is this evidence telling us ? • What are our findings? • Any clear areas of strength/areas in need of improvement emerging? • How do our findings fit with our current views? Analyse evidence using evaluation criteria/quality statements The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    20. 20. •Under the subthemes selected, use the relevant evaluation criteria/quality statement based on identified strengths and areas for improvement •Judge overall quality by indicating the school’s current position along the continuum Judgements made against the criteria or quality statements must be based on the information or evidence gathered The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    21. 21. Page 63 SSE Reports should be no longer than 2 / 3 pages The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    22. 22. P 68 Page 68 SSE must result in the setting of specific targets towards action for improvement – keep plans short! The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    23. 23. Who? Who? What? What? When? When? How? How? Building in time for monitoring and review allows for adjustments to be made and ensures SSE is a living process The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    24. 24. Provides direction Provides direction Provides focus Provides focus
    25. 25. Inclusive Schools : fundamental principles • Inclusion • Differentiation • Team Teaching The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    26. 26. One school’s story www.schoolself-evaluation.ie The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    27. 27. Reflection Take time now to consider your Take time now to consider your school’s current position with school’s current position with regard to SSE. Discuss and share regard to SSE. Discuss and share where you are at and share your where you are at and share your experiences or plans. experiences or plans. The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    28. 28. Key Messages • The primary purpose of school self-evaluation is to improve the quality of learner outcomes • School self-evaluation is an internal, reflective process of school review which requires schools to examine their practice honestly and critically • The gathering of evidence to justify and to inform action planning for improvement is a fundamental principle of school self-evaluation The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    29. 29. School Self-Evaluation Seminar for Post-Primary School Principals 2012 Session 2
    30. 30. Objectives Session 2 • To illustrate the 6 step SSE process through the lens of a literacy example • To provide specific guidance in the area of Target Setting The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    31. 31. Literacy Literacy includes the capacity to read, understand and critically appreciate various forms of communication including spoken language, printed text, broadcast media, and digital media. (Literacy & Numeracy for Learning and Life 2011, p.8) The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    32. 32. Literacy Worked example School Biography • • • • • • • All girls voluntary secondary school Under the trusteeship of CEIST 700 students 45 teachers Urban 20 feeder-schools Literacy core team in place The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    33. 33. Link Model WHOLE STAFF WHOLE STAFF SUBJECT DEPARTMENTS SUBJECT DEPARTMENTS Modern Modern Foreign Foreign Languages Languages Science Science Careers Careers & & SEN SEN History & History & Geography Geography Business Business Maths Maths Practical Practical Subjects & Subjects & PE PE Core Team Core Team Senior Senior Link Teacher Link Teacher Management Management The PDST is funded Literacy Training by the Department of Education and Literacy Training Skills SSE Training SSE Training under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013 English English & & Irish Irish
    34. 34. Literacy example Attainment of curriculum objectives Engagement in learning Teaching approaches The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    35. 35. What do you want to find out? THEME Learner Outcomes Learning experience SUB-THEME Attainment of curriculum objectives Engagement in Learning Teaching Approaches QUESTIONS BASED ON EVALUATION CRITERIA Attainment? Progress? Literacy skills? Attitude to literacy? Active? Motivated? Collaborative? Independent? Methods? Resources? ICT? TOOLS 1. STen scores 4. Questionnaire 2. JC & LC results 3. Studentsfunded by the Department of Education and work The PDST is Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013 Teachers’ Practice 5. Questionnaire
    36. 36. Guiding staff reflection Learner outcomes  Students’ overall attainment, with regard to knowledge, understanding and skills in subjects and programmes, has improved significantly in line with targets; and expected outcomes have been achieved  Students enjoy learning the subject and have developed appropriate attitudes and dispositions Learning experiences  Learning settings are safe, well maintained, visually stimulating and supportive of literacy and numeracy  Students have access to appropriate materials, including ICT, to support learning  Students are enabled to engage actively in a range of suitably challenging, relevant and interesting learning opportunities  Students can meet the literacy and numeracy challenges of the subject  Students are given support as needed  Students at risk of underachieving have made good progress  Students are equipped with tools and skills for learning now and in the future.  Students’ uptake levels and performance in state examinations compares favourably with national norms, within the school context. Teachers’ practice  Teachers prepare thoroughly for lessons; expected learning outcomes including literacy and numeracy development are clearly stated; and necessary resources are in place  Expected learning outcomes are clearly communicated; lessons are suitably paced to enable progression in development of knowledge and skills  Teaching is focused, stimulating and relevant. All aspects of the subject, including subjectspecific language, are thoroughly taught  All students are respected; high but realistic expectations are communicated; and efforts and achievements are affirmed  A range of assessment methods is used effectively to assess progress.
    37. 37. 6 class report cards th The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    38. 38. 2012 1st Year Reading Sten Score Analysis The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    39. 39. Well below average below av average average above av well above average School National Click here
    40. 40. Other Assessment Data • What most schools are doing? • Click here for an overview of information on standardised testing in primary & postprimary schools in Ireland. • Link to presentation ……………… The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    41. 41. Analysis of State Exams JC ANALYSIS TOOL LC ANALYSIS TOOL LCA/LCVP ANALYSIS TOOL Click to access on-line The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    42. 42. Analysis of JC & LC Subject X The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    43. 43. Scanning 6 class report cards th • Screen shot of report card • Link to circular The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    44. 44. SEC Chief Examiners Report JC Geography 2011 •Ensure that students are aware of the difference between description, explanation & effects. •To this end students could be encouraged to develop descriptions & explanations both in their class work & homework. The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    45. 45. Sample editing/writing checklist devised by the whole staff Satisfactory Spelling – fewer than 3 errors Punctuation & Grammar – fewer than 3 errors Sequencing (new paragraphs/bullet point used for new ideas in correct order) Vocabulary (general & subject specific) Clearly used Structure of sentence/answer – full sentences used/answers developed to the standard required by the question. The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013 Not satisfactory
    46. 46. Samples of student’s work from a range of subjects The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    47. 47. Analysis of students’ written work from a sample across the curriculum The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    48. 48. Sample questionnaire for students
    49. 49. The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    50. 50. Student Survey Strengths • 50% read for more than 1 hr. • 60% reading fiction & magazines • Students experience a variety of variety of methodologies. • Students are confident working in pairs & groups Priorities for improvement • Very few students believe that their writing is legible & even fewer edit their own work. • More students prefer to write on facebook than other genres. • A general lack of confidence in speaking in class discussions.
    51. 51. Sample questionnaire for teachers
    52. 52. Teachers Survey Strengths • 54% of teachers are using comprehension strategies • Cooperative learning strategies being used. • Use of multiple text types i.e. broadcast & digital media. • Clear focused feedback is given to students Priorities for improvement • Further use of comprehension strategies by all teachers • Agreed success criteria shared with students for improving writing process is clearly needed. • Questioning techniques to improve verbal & written answers.
    53. 53. Activity •Identify strengths and areas for improvement from the evidence you have been allocated •Collate strengths and areas for improvement using the diagnostic window The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    54. 54. Consult appropriate evaluation criteria to support your analysis THEME Learner Outcomes Learning Experiences Teachers’ Practice SUBTHEME Attainment of curriculum objectives Engagement in learning Teaching approaches Evaluation criteria p. 30 p. 34 p. 40 The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    55. 55. Checking In • Recording findings, strengths and areas for improvement • Benchmarking the findings for the identified themes/subthemes with the relevant evaluation criteria/quality statement The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    56. 56. The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    57. 57. School Improvement Plan • Image of report The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    58. 58. Targets Improvement targets may relate to any aspect of pupils’ achievement, including their knowledge, skills and their attitudes. ( SSE Guidelines p.61 ) The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    59. 59. SMART Targets • Specific - focus on student learning outcomes • Measurable – clear and precise • Attainable - reflect ability and needs of studentsappropriately challenging / ambitious • Realistic – to both school context, baseline data and specific actions • Timed - allowing time for planned actions to be implemented
    60. 60. Language of targets The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    61. 61. A useful formula … An example: To decrease (verb) the number of students who stated that they did not like writing (thing effected) from 16% (baseline) to 13% (level intended) by May 2013 from 13% to 10 % by May 2014 from 10% to 7% by May 2015 TARGETS NEED TO REFLECT A SCHOOLS INTENTION TO IMPROVE ON ITS PREVIOUS BEST The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    62. 62. School Improvement Plan • Image of report The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    63. 63. Who? Who? What? What? When? When? How? How? The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    64. 64. One school’s story www.schoolself-evaluation.ie The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    65. 65. Reflect and discuss In what way has this activity In what way has this activity developed your understanding of developed your understanding of ••useof evaluation methods/tools use of evaluation methods/tools ••dataanalysis and interpretation data analysis and interpretation ••writingan SSE report writing an SSE report ••devisinga school improvement devising a school improvement plan to include targets? plan to include targets? The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    66. 66. Key Messages • The primary purpose of school self-evaluation is to improve the quality of learner outcomes • School self-evaluation is an internal, reflective process of school review which requires schools to examine their practice honestly and critically • The gathering of evidence to justify and to inform action planning for improvement is a fundamental principle of school self-evaluation The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    67. 67. School Self-Evaluation Seminar for Post-Primary School Principals 2012 Session 3
    68. 68. Objectives Session 3 • To consolidate the six step SSE process through the lens of a numeracy example • To provide participants with an opportunity to reflect on and consider next steps The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    69. 69. Numeracy Numeracy encompasses the ability to use mathematical understanding and skills to solve problems and meet the demands of day-to-day living in complex social settings. (Literacy & Numeracy for Learning and Life 2011, p.8) The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    70. 70. Numeracy worked example School Biography • • • • • • DEIS Mixed Urban 300 students 15% EAL students TY & LCA & JCSP The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    71. 71. Link Model WHOLE STAFF WHOLE STAFF SUBJECT DEPARTMENTS SUBJECT DEPARTMENTS Modern Modern Foreign Foreign Languages Languages Science Science Careers Careers & & SEN SEN History & History & Geography Geography Business Business Maths Maths Practical Practical Subjects Subjects Core Team Core Team Link Teacher Link Teacher Senior Senior Management Management The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Numeracy Training Skills SSE Training Numeracy Training SSE Training under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013 English English & & Irish Irish
    72. 72. Numeracy example Attainment of curriculum objectives Engagement in learning Teaching approaches The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    73. 73. What do you want to find out? THEME Learner Outcomes Learning experience SUB-THEME Attainment of curriculum objectives Engagement in Learning Teaching Approaches QUESTIONS BASED ON EVALUATION CRITERIA Attainment? Progress? Numeracy skills? Attitude to numeracy? Active? Motivated? Collaborative? Independent? Methods? Consistency? Whole school approach? TOOLS 1. CAT scores 4. Questionnaire 2. JC & LC results 3. Maths is funded by the Department of Education and The PDST Competency Test Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013 Teachers’ Practice 5. Focus group with numeracy schedule prompt question
    74. 74. Guiding Staff Reflection Learner outcomes  Students’ overall attainment, with regard to knowledge, understanding and skills in subjects and programmes, has improved significantly in line with targets; and expected outcomes have been achieved  Students enjoy learning the subject and have developed appropriate attitudes and dispositions Learning experiences  Learning settings are safe, well maintained, visually stimulating and supportive of literacy and numeracy  Students have access to appropriate materials, including ICT, to support learning  Students are enabled to engage actively in a range of suitably challenging, relevant and interesting learning opportunities  Students can meet the literacy and numeracy challenges of the subject  Students are given support as needed  Students at risk of underachieving have made good progress  Students are equipped with tools and skills for learning now and in the future.  Students’ uptake levels and performance in state examinations compares favourably with national norms, within the school context. Teachers’ practice  Teachers prepare thoroughly for lessons; expected learning outcomes including literacy and numeracy development are clearly stated; and necessary resources are in place  Expected learning outcomes are clearly communicated; lessons are suitably paced to enable progression in development of knowledge and skills  Teaching is focused, stimulating and relevant. All aspects of the subject, including subjectspecific language, are thoroughly taught  All students are respected; high but realistic expectations are communicated; and efforts and achievements are affirmed  A range of assessment methods is used effectively to assess progress.
    75. 75. Analysis of CAT scores The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    76. 76. Maths Well below average…………………………….average….…………………………… well above average School National Click here to access on-line
    77. 77. Analysis of State Exams The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    78. 78. Analysis of JC & LC Maths The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    79. 79. Maths Competency Test Bar chart showing the percentage of students who answered questions correctly Target: 80% of cohort to achieve proficiency Click here for sample test The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    80. 80. Sample questionnaire for students
    81. 81. Student Survey Strengths • 52% of students like maths • 57% of students check their answers • 79% said there was usually more than one way to work out a problem • Students are engaging in independent & cooperative learning • 81% believe they need maths after school Priorities for improvement • Only 15% of students felt that teachers had a positive attitude to maths • Only 11% of students said they are good at figuring out questions they have not seen before • 29% of students said they are not good at explaining maths in their own words
    82. 82. Activity •Identify strengths and areas for improvement from the evidence you have been allocated •Collate strengths and areas for improvement using the diagnostic window The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    83. 83. Consult appropriate evaluation criteria to support your analysis THEME Learner Outcomes Learner Experiences Teachers’ Practice SUBTHEME Attainment of curriculum objectives Engagement in learning Teaching approaches Evaluation criteria p. 30 p. 34 p. 40 The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    84. 84. Checking In • Recording findings, strengths and areas for improvement • Identifying themes/subthemes emerging from the findings • Benchmarking the findings for the identified themes/subthemes with the relevant evaluation criteria/quality statement The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    85. 85. 1. Introduction 1.1 The focus of the evaluation 1.2 School context 2. The findings 3. Progress made on previously-identified improvement targets 4. Summary of school self-evaluation findings 4.1 Our school has strengths in the following areas: (List the main strengths of the school with regard to teaching and learning)) 4.2 Thefollowing areas are prioritised for improvement: (Specify the aspects of teaching and learning that need to be improved) 4.3 The following legislative and regulatory requirements need to be addressed. (Specify the aspects that need to be addressed) SSE Reports should be no longer than 2 / 3 pages The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    86. 86. School Improvement Plan • Image of report The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    87. 87. Who? Who? What? What? When? When? How? How? The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    88. 88. Broad requirements • build on the existing SDP process • evaluate the quality of teaching and learning in literacy, numeracy and at least one other aspect of T & L over the four year period from 2012/13 to 2015/16 • write a short SSE report for the area examined • devise a SIP for aspects of practice identified for improvement in the area examined • First SIP to be in place by June 2013 • Each subject department to engage in self-evaluation with a specific focus on the area selected. The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    89. 89. Example of a roadmap for the next 4 years Year 1 2012/13 Year 2 2013/14 Literacy Implement SIP for Gather evidence Literacy SIP in place by June 2013 Numeracy Gather evidence SIP in place by June 2014 Year 3 2014/15 Year 4 2015/16 Implement SIP for Numeracy Implement SIP for other area Continue to implement and monitor SIP for Literacy Continue to implement and monitor SIP for Literacy and SIP for Numeracy Other Area Gather evidence SIP in place by June 2015 The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    90. 90. One school’s story www.schoolself-evaluation.ie The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    91. 91. Reflect … what next? In light of today’s seminar In light of today’s seminar what actions do you need what actions do you need consider in the consider in the ••shortterm short term ••mediumterm medium term ••longterm? long term? The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    92. 92. Remaining Questions The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    93. 93. SSE: Support for schools Department of Education and Skills: Inspectorate www.schoolself-evaluation.ie www.pdst.ie The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    94. 94. Support yourselves • Plan for SSE – link it to your existing school improvement agenda • Integrate SSE into the day to day life of your school • Allow time • Share the tasks • Acknowledge your context The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    95. 95. SSE: What’s in it for schools? • SSE affirms what is already working • SSE ensures that plans for improvement are rooted in evidence • SSE trusts and supports teachers as professionals • SSE acknowledges school context • SSE provides schools with a logical review framework • SSE is inclusive of all voices • SSE can significantly improve student learning “Self-evaluation is the crucial mechanism for achieving any kind of school improvement” (MacBeath, 1999:153) The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    96. 96. Key Messages • The primary purpose of school self-evaluation is to improve the quality of learner outcomes • School self-evaluation is an internal, reflective process of school review which requires schools to examine their practice honestly and critically • The gathering of evidence to justify and to inform action planning for improvement is a fundamental principle of school self-evaluation The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013
    97. 97. LINKS TO CIRCULARS & DOCUMENTS 1. National Strategy for Literacy & Numeracy 2. Summary of Strategy 3. DES SSE Guidelines for Post-primary Schools 4. Department Circular 0056/2011 (re: transfer of data) 5. Department Circular 0025/2012 (re: implementation of L & N strategy) 6. Department Circular 0040/2012 (re: implementation of SSE) 7. Report Card Templates (primary school) 8. NCCA Information re analysing standardised tests 9. NEPS resource pack for PP teachers 10. DES approved post-primary assessments The PDST is funded by the Department of Education and Skills under the National Development Plan, 2007-2013

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