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Brown County 2009 Community Food Security        Report                       Karen Early M.S. R.D.        Brown County UW...
History:   First local study done in 1998 in response to changes     in welfare and family support programs. Validated   ...
Purpose: To Determine Prevalence and level of food security among at‐risk   households in Green Bay, Wisconsin in 2009 an...
Preparation:Re‐establish University partnershipConvene an advisory committeeStudents conduct literature reviewDetermin...
Community Advisory Committee   Steve Hero –Director of Social Concerns Green Bay Diocese   Rosemary  Jonas –Integrated C...
Student Literature Review Topics:   Causes of Food Insecurity: Perceived and Real   History and Utilization of Food Pant...
Professional Social Work Students   Jenna Albright, Kelly Hirsch, Kristina Andrew, Amanda    Johnson, Alisha Andrews, Dan...
Participating Food Pantries   AIDS Resource Center   Pauls Pantry   Pulaski Community Pantry   Resurrection Lutheran C...
Participating Pantry
English, Russian, Spanish and Hmong
Students Trained on Delivering Survey
UWGB Students Entering 713 Surveys collected at 17 Brown County Pantries
40 UWGB Professional Social Work      Program Entering Data
Why Do We Look at Food Insecurity? There are physical, mental and emotional  health consequences Affects learning and be...
National Food Insecurity Rate 14.6% of U.S. households struggle to put enough food on the table (2008) Over 46 million, ...
…continued That’s       an increase of 4.1 million people from 2007 to 2009.   The highest recorded rate of          food...
Food Insecurity Affects: Mental   physical   and emotional functioning    1 in 5 U.S. children now live in       food i...
Mental Functioning   Diminished capacity to concentrate and    learn   Lower test scores and school achievement   Repea...
Physical Health   Poorer overall health and compromised    ability to resist illness   More health problems such as stom...
Emotional Health   Difficulty getting along with others   Higher rates of aggression and passivity,    Hyperactivity and...
Food Insecurity Affects: Individuals Families Schools Communities
Food Security Defined:When all people at all times have  physical and economic access to  sufficient food to meet their d...
A Food Secure Community                   Provides   Availability of a variety of foods at a reasonable cost   Access to...
Methodology: Sample size goal of 808 interviews Sample size determined based on the average number served per      month...
Questionnaire   The USDA Food    Security Survey was    used to measure food    security status.
USDAs revised labels describe            ranges of food security                                                     Detai...
Examples of Food Security/Hunger Questions:   “The food we bought just didn’t last, and we didn’t    have money to get mo...
Additional Questions Were Added: Demographics Food Assistance Utilization Reasons for Not Enough Food Nutrition and He...
Results: Demographics Gender Age   of Respondent Age   of Children in Household Ethnicity   of Respondent Educational...
Gender of Food Pantry   Users Surveyed                  31%                        Male                        Female  69%...
Age of RespondentsPie Chart Representing Age Demographics of Respondents            7%   2%                           20%1...
Age of Children of the Pantry Users              Surveyed                  Age of Children in Households          20%     ...
Ethnicity                                           American Indian or      Ethnicity reported by respondents             ...
Education Level      Food Security by Level of Education                 15%30%                                   Less tha...
Results: Food Security Status   Overall   Gender   Ethnicity   With children   10 year comparison
Overall Food Security Status                                 Percent of Overall Food Security Status 2009 (N = 713)Very Lo...
Food Security by Ethnicity     of Respondents                 Percentage of Low & Very Low Food Security Level by Ethnicit...
Food Security Comparison       Regarding Ethnicity        Comparison between White and Combined Ethnic Populations        ...
Food Security Status of  Respondents with Children        Food Security Status of Households With Children,               ...
Food Security Status:                   Ten Year Comparison                   Ten Year Comparison of Food Security Status ...
Perceived and Real Contributors to          Food Insecurity                           Ten Year Comparison of Reasons Why N...
Results: Utilization of Food              Assistance First time use of food pantries Pantry usage in the past 12 months...
First Time Use of Food Pantry                                   First Time Use of Food Pantry                             ...
Pantry Usage in Past 12 Months                 Food Pantry Usage it the Past 12 Months                             2009 (N...
Reasons People do not Receive         Food Share                      Reasons People do not Receive Food Share            ...
Results: Nutrition and Health Importance of consuming 5 or more Consumption of the right amount Reasons why people don’...
Consumption of the Recommended  Amount of Vegetables and Fruit        Consumption of the Right Amount of Vegetables and   ...
Reasons Why Not Enough  Vegetables and Fruits are Eaten           Reasons People Do Not Eat the Right Amount of Vegetables...
Health Problems of Pantry User             Households           Reported Health Problems of Household Members of Pantry Us...
Results: Housing and Employment Housing status Adults currently working Food security status and employment Hourly wag...
Current Housing Status                    Current Housing Status                 2009 (N = 624), 2004 (N =641)            ...
Employed Adults in the Household
Food Security by Employment Status           2009 Food Security Status by Current               Employment, 2009 (N = 351)...
Hourly Wage of Primary Job                      Hourly Wages of Primary Job                       2009 (n =232), 2004 (n =...
Sources of Income               Sources of Household Income Last Month (multiple response)                                ...
Results: Strategies Used to Improve                Food Security Resources that would help improve food  security Strate...
Resources That Would Help     Get Enough Food
Strategies Used to Have Enough                   Money for Food                        Strategies Used to Have Enough Mone...
Types of Assistance Used to Improve Food Security by Food Security Level                 Food Assistance Used by Food Secu...
Types of Food Assistance Used:          2004 ‐ 2009 Compared                    Food Assistance Programs Used by Responden...
Limitations of Research Pantry hours and student availability Assertiveness Interpreters Pantry acceptance Consumers ...
The Community Responds
Wisconsin Food Security ConsortiumEnding Hunger in Wisconsin Strategies:   1. Family Economic Security   2. Access to Af...
1. Family Economic Security Increasing access to education and training Improving job opportunities Affordable and appr...
Marley Street Garden Vendor at   Present Broadway Market
Commercial Kitchen: UHAACC
Commercial Kitchen in Use
Food Entrepreneur
Community Resource Handbook
2.  Access to Affordable and               Healthy food (examples) Nutrition education Needs assessment and advocacy for...
Oneida Center for Self Sufficiency
Walk and Talk:Money for  Food Nutrition Education
Breastfeeding Education
Save‐A‐Lot Grocery Store
Save‐A‐Lot Grocery Store
Downtown Food Project
Membership Options for   New Leaf Market   Excerpt from Membership Brochure
Fruit and Vegetable Access Audit –        Variety and Quality
Fruit and Vegetable Audit
Community Gardens Community gardens space availability  increased gardeners from 6 families on  one city lot to 180 famil...
Fruits of Labor
3. Federal Food Program Outreach:            Food Share Food Stamp outreach to eligible participants   increased particip...
USDA Outreach Campaign
EBT at the Farmers Market  coming next season!!!
Percent Change in Food Share Recipients 2000‐2008   Figure 34                            Percent Change in Food Stamp Rec...
3. Federal Food Program Outreach:      WIC (Women Infant and Children)   Figure 35                             Estimated ...
3. Federal Food Program Outreach:     School and Summer Meals   Summer breakfast program participation increased by     5...
Percentage of Green Bay Students Eligible of Free and Reduced Meals   Figure 36                                  Percenta...
Percentage of Low Income Children With School Breakfast Access   Figure 37                 Percent of low‐income children...
Percent Change in School Breakfast         Daily Participation   Figure 38                  Percent change in average dai...
Percent Change in Daily Summer        Meal Sites July 2001‐2008   Figure 39                   Percent Change in Average D...
3. Federal Food Program Outreach:     Senior Farmers Market Vouchers Advocated for statewide access to Senior   Farmers M...
4. Emergency Food Assistance:             Food Pantries   Postal Food Drive   Boy Scout Food Drive   Beer Belly /run  ...
Feeding America Partnership
Plant a Row for the Hungry
Festival Food “Cart Away Hunger”
Feed the Children
Food Pantry Utilization Trends                                                                                Food Pantry ...
Strategies to End Hunger in Wisconsin    1. Family Economic Security   2. Access to Affordable and Healthy Food   3. Fe...
“To eliminate food insecurity….   interventions are needed including, adequate    funding for and increase in utilization ...
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Brown County UW-Extension Food Security Presentation

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Brown County UW-Extension Food Security Presentation

  1. 1. Brown County 2009 Community Food Security  Report Karen Early M.S. R.D. Brown County UW Extension Nutrition Education Program Program Coordinator Cathy Huntowski Brown County UW Nutrition Education Program Nutrition Educator Gail Trimberger MSSW, LCSW University of Wisconsin Green Bay Social Work Professional Programs Assistant Professor
  2. 2. History: First local study done in 1998 in response to changes  in welfare and family support programs. Validated  in1999. Share findings with community Implemented initiatives to increase access to healthy  food, improve utilization of Federal nutrition  programs and improve emergency food assistance in  Brown County Repeated survey in 2004 and 2009
  3. 3. Purpose: To Determine Prevalence and level of food security among at‐risk  households in Green Bay, Wisconsin in 2009 and  how it compares to  2004 and 1999 findings Contributors to food insecurity Strategies used to improve food security Demographics, housing status and nutrition  knowledge of pantry users Types of initiatives that would increase the  availability and accessibility of food
  4. 4. Preparation:Re‐establish University partnershipConvene an advisory committeeStudents conduct literature reviewDetermine community focused questionsTranslate survey into Spanish, Hmong and RussianEnlisted participation of  food pantriesDetermine sample size and interpreter needsTrain students Arrange interview schedule
  5. 5. Community Advisory Committee Steve Hero –Director of Social Concerns Green Bay Diocese Rosemary  Jonas –Integrated Community Services Donna Kessler –St. Patrick’s Food Pantry David Littig – UWGB Professor Emeritus Political Sciences Kathy McMurray –NEWCAP ‐TFAP Cathy Putman – United Way Gail Trimberger –UWGB Social Work Professor Julie Van Klooster –St. Luke’s Methodist Food Pantry Judy Knudsen – Brown County UWEX Family Living Educator Cathy Huntowski – Brown County UWEX Nutrition Educator Karen Early –Brown County UWEX Nutrition Program  Coordinator
  6. 6. Student Literature Review Topics: Causes of Food Insecurity: Perceived and Real History and Utilization of Food Pantries History and Utilization of Food Stamps/Food Share Food Insecurity and Food Choices: Fruits and Vegetables Relationship between Food Security and Health Strategies to Improve Food Security: A Consumer Perspective Strategies to Improve Food Security: Community Interventions Relationship between Food Security and Housing Security Relationship between Food Security and Employment
  7. 7. Professional Social Work Students Jenna Albright, Kelly Hirsch, Kristina Andrew, Amanda Johnson, Alisha Andrews, Danielle Kuntz, Kristen Beck, May Kaying, LorAlan Berdan, Jodi Loritz, Amy Binsfeld, Adria Meyerhofer, Colleen Bird, Dawn Natzke, Lisa Bohl, Jessica Nell, Alebra Cornelius, Katrina Puyleart, Natalie Doemel, Stephanie Scott, Melia Everhart, Sharon Skenandore, Carolyn Feck, Eugene Smalls, Lauren Flannery, Crystal Smith, Heather Goetsch, Lyn Stanton, Trish Gordon, Holly Visser, Amber Grall, Tara Wettstein, Lacey Groelle, Alicia Wheeler, Sarita Gruszynski, Jenna Wilke, Arielle Hille, Christina Wold, Laura Zimbler
  8. 8. Participating Food Pantries AIDS Resource Center Pauls Pantry Pulaski Community Pantry Resurrection Lutheran Church St. Bernards Church St. Patrick Catholic Parish St. Willebrord Parish The Salvation Army Trinity Lutheran Church Calvary Lutheran Church DePere Christian Outreach Denmark Food Pantry First Presbyterian Church First United Methodist Church The Giving Tree Grace Lutheran Church Manna for Life
  9. 9. Participating Pantry
  10. 10. English, Russian, Spanish and Hmong
  11. 11. Students Trained on Delivering Survey
  12. 12. UWGB Students Entering 713 Surveys collected at 17 Brown County Pantries
  13. 13. 40 UWGB Professional Social Work  Program Entering Data
  14. 14. Why Do We Look at Food Insecurity? There are physical, mental and emotional health consequences Affects learning and behavior in children Community strategies can improve food security for individuals National rate is the highest ever Nobody in the United Sates needs to be food insecure or hungry.
  15. 15. National Food Insecurity Rate 14.6% of U.S. households struggle to put enough food on the table (2008) Over 46 million, including 16.7 million children live in these households.
  16. 16. …continued That’s an increase of 4.1 million people from 2007 to 2009. The highest recorded rate of food insecurity
  17. 17. Food Insecurity Affects: Mental physical and emotional functioning 1 in 5 U.S. children now live in food insecure households
  18. 18. Mental Functioning Diminished capacity to concentrate and learn Lower test scores and school achievement Repeating a grade in school Increase in school absences, tardiness and school suspension
  19. 19. Physical Health Poorer overall health and compromised ability to resist illness More health problems such as stomach aches, headaches, colds, ear infections, and fatigue All contributing to increased health costs
  20. 20. Emotional Health Difficulty getting along with others Higher rates of aggression and passivity, Hyperactivity and anxiety Affects feeling self self worth and ability to actualize potential
  21. 21. Food Insecurity Affects: Individuals Families Schools Communities
  22. 22. Food Security Defined:When all people at all times have  physical and economic access to  sufficient food to meet their dietary  needs for a productive and healthy  life.
  23. 23. A Food Secure Community  Provides Availability of a variety of foods at a reasonable cost Access to a grocery store or other sources that supply food Sufficient personal income to purchase food that meets nutritional  needs for each household member Freedom to choose enough personally acceptable food Confidence in the quality and safety of food available Access to accurate information about food and nutrition
  24. 24. Methodology: Sample size goal of 808 interviews Sample size determined based on the average number served per  month at each pantry.   Interviews conducted at 17 pantries by 40 UW Green Bay  Social Work students USDA methodology was utilized to determine food security status   based on a series of questions Cross tabulations computed to  show relationship of food security to  selected factors 88.2% of target sample was interviewed with 713 responding
  25. 25. Questionnaire The USDA Food Security Survey was used to measure food security status.
  26. 26. USDAs revised labels describe  ranges of food security Detailed categories General categories(old and new labels are the same) Old label New label Description of conditions in the household High food No reported indications of food-access problems or limitations security Food security Food security One or two reported indications—typically of anxiety over food Marginal food sufficiency or shortage of food in the house. Little or no security indication of changes in diets or food intake Three or more affirmative responses. Reports of reduced Food insecurity Low food security quality, variety, or desirability of diet. Little or no indication of without hunger reduced food intake Food insecurity Reports of multiple indications of disrupted eating patterns and Food insecurity Very low food reduced food intake. with hunger security (Eight affirmative out of 18 with children and six out of ten affirmative without children)
  27. 27. Examples of Food Security/Hunger Questions: “The food we bought just didn’t last, and we didn’t have money to get more.” Was that often, sometimes, or never true for you in the last 12 months? In the last 12 months, did you ever cut the size of your meals or skip meals because there wasn’t enough money for food? In the last 12 months, did you ever not eat for a whole day because there wasn’t enough money for food?
  28. 28. Additional Questions Were Added: Demographics Food Assistance Utilization Reasons for Not Enough Food Nutrition and Health Housing Employment Strategies Used to Have Enough Resources to Help
  29. 29. Results: Demographics Gender Age of Respondent Age of Children in Household Ethnicity of Respondent Educational Level
  30. 30. Gender of Food Pantry Users Surveyed 31% Male Female 69% Note. N = 681
  31. 31. Age of RespondentsPie Chart Representing Age Demographics of Respondents 7% 2% 20%17% 30 or younger 31 ‐ 40 41 ‐ 50 51 ‐ 60 61 ‐ 70 26% 71+ 28%
  32. 32. Age of Children of the Pantry Users  Surveyed Age of Children in Households 20% 30% Under 5 yrs.  5 yrs. ‐ 17 No children 50%
  33. 33. Ethnicity American Indian or Ethnicity reported by respondents Alaskan Native Asian American 4% 3% 8% African American 0% 0% 7% 20% White Native Hawaiian or Pasific Islander0% Russian0% Hispanic  Somalian 58% Hmong
  34. 34. Education Level Food Security by Level of Education 15%30% Less than 9th grade 9th ‐11th grade 18% High school graduate or equivalent More than high school 37%
  35. 35. Results: Food Security Status Overall Gender Ethnicity With children 10 year comparison
  36. 36. Overall Food Security Status Percent of Overall Food Security Status 2009 (N = 713)Very Low Food Security 38% Food Security Level Low Food Security 44% Very Low Food Security Low Food Security 1 Marginal Food SecurityMarginal Food Security High Food Security 11% High Food Security 7% 0.00% 10.00% 20.00% 30.00% 40.00% 50.00%
  37. 37. Food Security by Ethnicity of Respondents Percentage of Low & Very Low Food Security Level by Ethnicity Hmong 96%American 90% Indian African Percentage of Low & Very 87% Low Food Security Level byAmerican EthnicityCaucasian 79% Hispanic 47% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 120%
  38. 38. Food Security Comparison Regarding Ethnicity Comparison between White and Combined Ethnic Populations Experiencing Low to Very Low Food SecurityCombined Ethnic 85%Population Combined Ethnic Population White Population White 79%Population 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 120%
  39. 39. Food Security Status of Respondents with Children Food Security Status of Households With Children,  2009 (N = 713)Food Insecure  81.7 % Food Insecure Food Secure Food Secure 18.2% 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 Brown County UW-Extension 2009 Food Security Research
  40. 40. Food Security Status:  Ten Year Comparison Ten Year Comparison of Food Security Status of Food Pantry Users 2009 (N = 713), 2004 (N = 641), 1999 (N = 277)100% 89.00%90% 81.70%80% 71.16%70%60% 200950% 1 200440% 1999 28.30%30% 18.30%20% 11.00%10% 0%   Secur e Insec u re Fo o d   Foo d   Brown County UW-Extension 2009 Food Security Research
  41. 41. Perceived and Real Contributors to  Food Insecurity Ten Year Comparison of Reasons Why Not Enough food 2009 (N=713), 2004 (N=641), 1999 (N=277)     Multiple Response child care problems 36.7% 7.1% cant get to the pantry during open hours 31.0% 36.7% 61.3% no grocery store in the area 21.0% 20.1% 39.0% work schedule 26.6% 20.8% bus doesnt go where I need it to go 31.5% 22.8% bus costs too much 50.0% 24.8% no car 32.0% 34.7% 68.3% 1999 too hard to get to the store 32.2% 21.6% 2004 22.0% dont know how to prepare the foods given to me 13.5% 12.8% 2009 not able to cook or eat because of health problems 13.5% no working refrigerator available 9.6% 14.0% no working stove available 13.0% 11.2% on a diet 16.2% not enough time for shopping or cooking 20.3% 91.0% not enough money for food 90.4% 85.6% 0.0% 20.0% 40.0% 60.0% 80.0% 100.0%
  42. 42. Results: Utilization of Food  Assistance First time use of food pantries Pantry usage in the past 12 months Utilization of Food Share
  43. 43. First Time Use of Food Pantry First Time Use of Food Pantry 2009 (N = 713), 2004 (N = 641) more than 2 years ago 40.6% 40.1% 1 to 2 years ago 12.0% 17.7% 6 months to a year ago 14.7% 13.4% 2004 28.2% 2009sometime in the last 6 months 23.2% today is the first time 4.1% 4.5% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50%
  44. 44. Pantry Usage in Past 12 Months Food Pantry Usage it the Past 12 Months 2009 (N = 713)9‐12 22.0% 6‐9 8.6% Number of Months 4‐6 15.1% Received Food from more than 1 Pantry 1‐3 43.6% Food from more than 1 0 4.1% Pantry Yes 41.0% 0.0% 10.0% 20.0% 30.0% 40.0% 50.0%
  45. 45. Reasons People do not Receive Food Share Reasons People do not Receive Food Share  (food stamps) Multiple Response 2009 (N = 627), 2004 (N = 641) I dont want food stamps 21.4% 17.2% I dont need food stamps 20.1% 20.5% application process is too difficult 14.6% 19.2% don’t know how to apply 19.0% 25.3% 2004applied for food stamps but not eligible 35.7% 2009 31.5% don’t think youre eligible 44.7% 43.0% don’t know about food stamps 13.2% 11.4% 0.0% 10.0% 20.0% 30.0% 40.0% 50.0%
  46. 46. Results: Nutrition and Health Importance of consuming 5 or more Consumption of the right amount Reasons why people don’t eat the right amount Reported health problems
  47. 47. Consumption of the Recommended  Amount of Vegetables and Fruit Consumption of the Right Amount of Vegetables and  Fruit 2009 (N = 675), 2004 (N = 641) 1.60% dont know should eat more 69.1% 73.2% 2004 2009 29.3% eat right amount 26.8% 0.0% 20.0% 40.0% 60.0% 80.0%
  48. 48. Reasons Why Not Enough  Vegetables and Fruits are Eaten Reasons People Do Not Eat the Right Amount of Vegetables and Fruits  N = 713: multiple response, 2009 10.6% 12.7% not available in the store where I need to 12.5% shop 14.5% the store doesnt carry the kinds I like 15.8% I feel they spoil too quickly and will go to waste they cost too much14.9% 47.0% I don’t care for the taste My kids wont eat them I don’t know what to do with them (how to prepare them) other 69.4%
  49. 49. Health Problems of Pantry User  Households Reported Health Problems of Household Members of Pantry Users  Multiple Responses 2009 (N = 713), 2004 (N = 641) Other NR 26.2% Asthma 34.1% 33.3% Heart disease 15.7% 14.6%High blood pressure 36.3% 35.3% 2004 Diabetes 22.5% 24.6% 2009 Underweight NR 13.5% Overweight 40.0% 45.3% Depression 46.3% 42.8% 0.0% 10.0% 20.0% 30.0% 40.0% 50.0%
  50. 50. Results: Housing and Employment Housing status Adults currently working Food security status and employment Hourly wage Sources of income
  51. 51. Current Housing Status Current Housing Status 2009 (N = 624), 2004 (N =641) 12.0%own my home 19.3% 2004 83.8% 2009 rent 78.0% 0.0% 20.0% 40.0% 60.0% 80.0% 100.0%
  52. 52. Employed Adults in the Household
  53. 53. Food Security by Employment Status 2009 Food Security Status by Current  Employment, 2009 (N = 351) 6.3% 10.8% 39.0% High food security Marginal food security Low food security Very low food security 43.9%
  54. 54. Hourly Wage of Primary Job Hourly Wages of Primary Job  2009 (n =232), 2004 (n =255) over $16.25 0.5% 3.0%$12.01 ‐ $16.25 3.9% 10.3% $8.85 ‐ $12.00 25.7% 32.3% 2004 $7.51 ‐ $8.84 29.6% 27.6% 2009 $6.76 ‐ $7.50 20.4% 15.1% $4.00 ‐ $6.75 19.9% 1.8% 0.0% 5.0% 10.0% 15.0% 20.0% 25.0% 30.0% 35.0%
  55. 55. Sources of Income Sources of Household Income Last Month (multiple response) 2009 (N = 713) employment 7.3% 16.0% pension 8.3% 52.9% unemployment disability/workers compensation social security22.0% child support W2 4.6% 6.2% SSI 11.5% earned income  tax credit 19.2% housing assistance 28.3% 12.6% other
  56. 56. Results: Strategies Used to Improve Food Security Resources that would help improve food security Strategies used to have enough money for food Food assistance used in last 12 months by food security level Food assistance used in last 12 months 2005-2009 compared
  57. 57. Resources That Would Help  Get Enough Food
  58. 58. Strategies Used to Have Enough  Money for Food Strategies Used to Have Enough Money for Food  Multiple Responses 2009 (N = 713), 2004 (N = 641) other 0.0% 12.7% borrowed from a friend 0.0% 48.5% used rent‐to‐own stores 0.0% 6.9% used payday loan services 0.0% 23.0% neglected healthcare needs 28.9% 36.6% 2004 got an additional job 24.3% 2009 18.1% living with another household 19.8% 17.4%not paid rent or mortgage on time 31.1% 34.5% moved into a shelter 6.8% 2.6% 0.0% 10.0% 20.0% 30.0% 40.0% 50.0% 60.0%
  59. 59. Types of Assistance Used to Improve Food Security by Food Security Level Food Assistance Used by Food Security Level 2009 (N = 713) Food Share 298 49 Food Pantries 510 113 Meal Sites 152 21 Summer Breakfast 63 9 Summer Lunch 160 Food Security Level 22 75 Food Insecure Shelter 6 Food Secure School Lunch 270 40 School Breakfast 238 31 Friends/Relatives 323 33 WIC 161 25 0 100 200 300 400 500 600
  60. 60. Types of Food Assistance Used:  2004 ‐ 2009 Compared Food Assistance Programs Used by Respondents in the Last 12 Months 2009 (N = 713), 2004 (N = 641)  food share (food stamps, 42.8% Quest card) 49.8% food pantries 92.9% 89.3% 20.3% community meal sites 24.8% 5.7%summer breakfast programs 10.0% 18.2%summer lunches in the park 26.1% 2004 13.6% shelters 11.6% 2009free or reduced school lunch 38.7% 44.5% free or reduced school 38.7% breakfast 38.5% 46.8% friends/relatives 51.0% 23.5% WIC 26.8% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100%
  61. 61. Limitations of Research Pantry hours and student availability Assertiveness Interpreters Pantry acceptance Consumers visiting multiple sites Confidentiality Data analysis
  62. 62. The Community Responds
  63. 63. Wisconsin Food Security ConsortiumEnding Hunger in Wisconsin Strategies: 1. Family Economic Security 2. Access to Affordable and Healthy Food 3. Federal Nutrition Programs 4. Emergency Food Assistance
  64. 64. 1. Family Economic Security Increasing access to education and training Improving job opportunities Affordable and appropriate childcare Affordable housing and energy Economic assistance programs utilized
  65. 65. Marley Street Garden Vendor at  Present Broadway Market
  66. 66. Commercial Kitchen: UHAACC
  67. 67. Commercial Kitchen in Use
  68. 68. Food Entrepreneur
  69. 69. Community Resource Handbook
  70. 70. 2.  Access to Affordable and        Healthy food (examples) Nutrition education Needs assessment and advocacy for development of downtown Save-A-Lot Grocery Development of downtown New Leaf Market Food Cooperative in the works Fruit and Vegetable Access Audit Community garden development
  71. 71. Oneida Center for Self Sufficiency
  72. 72. Walk and Talk:Money for  Food Nutrition Education
  73. 73. Breastfeeding Education
  74. 74. Save‐A‐Lot Grocery Store
  75. 75. Save‐A‐Lot Grocery Store
  76. 76. Downtown Food Project
  77. 77. Membership Options for  New Leaf Market  Excerpt from Membership Brochure
  78. 78. Fruit and Vegetable Access Audit – Variety and Quality
  79. 79. Fruit and Vegetable Audit
  80. 80. Community Gardens Community gardens space availability increased gardeners from 6 families on one city lot to 180 families on 20 acres of gardens at one time. Now reduced to130 plots and reduced acreage. Farmers market start-up for 16 new minority vendors Growers developed small businesses Established new farmers market
  81. 81. Fruits of Labor
  82. 82. 3. Federal Food Program Outreach: Food Share Food Stamp outreach to eligible participants  increased participation by 98% while the state  utilization rate increased 52% EBT at the Farmers Market is coming in 2011
  83. 83. USDA Outreach Campaign
  84. 84. EBT at the Farmers Market coming next season!!!
  85. 85. Percent Change in Food Share Recipients 2000‐2008 Figure 34 Percent Change in Food Stamp Recipients 2000 ‐ 2008 Brown County 191% Brown County Wisconsin Wisconsin 80% 0% 50% 100% 150% 200% 250%
  86. 86. 3. Federal Food Program Outreach:   WIC (Women Infant and Children) Figure 35 Estimated Percentage of Eligible WIC Recipients Served 2008 Brown County  106% Brown County  Wisconsin Wisconsin 80% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 120%
  87. 87. 3. Federal Food Program Outreach:  School and Summer Meals Summer breakfast program participation increased by  540% School breakfast program participation increased by  539% Number of summer lunch program meal sites increased  by 660% 
  88. 88. Percentage of Green Bay Students Eligible of Free and Reduced Meals Figure 36 Percentage of Free and Reduced Lunch Recipients  2009‐10  53% 2008‐09  51% 2007‐08   48% 2006‐07  46% 2005‐06  45% 2004‐05  43% Percentage of Free and 2003‐04 40% Reduced Lunch Recipients  2002‐03 37% 2001‐02 33% 2000‐01  34% 1999‐00  31% 1998‐99  23% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60%
  89. 89. Percentage of Low Income Children With School Breakfast Access Figure 37 Percent of low‐income children who have access to breakfast in their schools  (2006) Brown County 86% Brown County Wisconsin Wisconsin 81% 78% 80% 82% 84% 86% 88%
  90. 90. Percent Change in School Breakfast  Daily Participation Figure 38 Percent change in average daily participation in breakfast program (1999 ‐  2006) Brown County 196% Brown County Wisconsin Wisconsin 95% 0% 50% 100% 150% 200% 250%
  91. 91. Percent Change in Daily Summer  Meal Sites July 2001‐2008 Figure 39 Percent Change in Average Daily Attendance for Summer Meal  Sites July 2001 – July 2008 Brown County 76% Brown County Wisconsin  Wisconsin  19% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80%
  92. 92. 3. Federal Food Program Outreach: Senior Farmers Market Vouchers Advocated for statewide access to Senior  Farmers Market Voucher Program Distributed 550, $30.00 vouchers to Brown  County Seniors each year in 2002 – 2005 Turned program management over to Aging and  Disability Resource Center in 2006
  93. 93. 4. Emergency Food Assistance: Food Pantries Postal Food Drive Boy Scout Food Drive Beer Belly /run CROP Walk – funds raised were used to purchase  refrigerators for 8 pantries desiring to diversify the foods  offered to families Festival Foods Cart Away Hunger Feeding America Plant a Row for the Hungry University of Wisconsin Green Bay “Empty Bowl”  fundraiser with ceramics department.  
  94. 94. Feeding America Partnership
  95. 95. Plant a Row for the Hungry
  96. 96. Festival Food “Cart Away Hunger”
  97. 97. Feed the Children
  98. 98. Food Pantry Utilization Trends Food Pantry Usage Trends 2007‐2009 Households Adults Children 7,000 6,000 5,842 5,430 5,000 4,295 4,505 4,000 4,074 3,597 3,000 2,727 3,048 2,445 2,000 1,000 0 07 08 09 07 08 7 8 9 7 8 9 7 8 9 9 07 08 09 .  0 .  0 .  0 0 0  0 .  0 .  0 0 0           .  c.  g.  g.  r.  c.  c.  ne ne ri l ri l n. g. b b b t t t De Ap Oc Oc Oc De De Ju Ap Au Ap Au Au Fe Fe Fe Ju Ju
  99. 99. Strategies to End Hunger in Wisconsin  1. Family Economic Security 2. Access to Affordable and Healthy Food 3. Federal Nutrition Programs 4. Emergency Food Assistance
  100. 100. “To eliminate food insecurity…. interventions are needed including, adequate  funding for and increase in utilization of food and  nutrition assistance programs, inclusion of food and  nutrition education in such programs, and innovative  programs to promote and support individual and  household economic self‐sufficiency.”(American Dietetics Association Position Paper on Food Insecurity, 2010)

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