Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

NFSM 2017

95 views

Published on

National Food Safety Month presentation slides

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

NFSM 2017

  1. 1. NATIONAL FOOD SAFETY MONTH SEPT 2017
  2. 2. The Culture of Food Safety • Week 1 - What Is Food Safety? • Week 2 – Handwashing • Week 3 - The Role Of Food Safety Training • Week 4 - Time & Temperature Control
  3. 3. Week 1 - What Is Food Safety? Learn about the basics of food safety and how to control the five most common risk factors in your operation. • Activity • Poster
  4. 4. September 2017 Sponsored by WHAT IS FOOD SAFETY? Working in the restaurant and foodservice industry is not easy. You have responsibilities to your operation, your managers and coworkers, and your customers. The best way to meet those responsibilities is to keep the food you serve safe and build a foundation of food safety culture in your operation. To keep food safe, it is important to control the five most common risk factors that can cause a foodborne illness. The five risk factors and examples of each are listed below. Week 1: 1. Purchasing food from unsafe sources • Cooking food in a private home 4.Usingcontaminated equipment • Failing to wash, rinse, and sanitize equipment and utensils between uses 5. Practicing poor personal hygiene • Failing to wash hands correctly • Coughing or sneezing on food 2. Failing to cook food correctly • Cooking food to the incorrect internal temperature 3. Holding food at incorrect temperatures • Holding hot food lower than 135°F (57°C) • Holding cold food higher than 41°F (5°C) © 2017 National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation (NRAEF). All rights reserved. ServSafe® and the ServSafe logo are trademarks of NRAEF. National Restaurant Association® and arc design are trademarks of the National Restaurant Association. 17061201 v.1707 Safety Culture Food The of
  5. 5. Sponsored by WHAT IS FOOD SAFETY? 1.___________ Carlo served buttered noodles at 125°F (52°C) from a holding unit. 2.___________ Ashley plated salmon after using a thermometer to check its temperature of 135°F (57°C). 3.___________ Jasmine wore her uniform home but forgot to wash it before starting her shift. 4.___________ Jose formed burger patties on a cutting board and then used the same cutting board to prepare Caesar salads. 5.___________ Alex purchased frozen chicken breasts from his friend who raises chickens and sells their meat from his home. 6.___________ Fawzia answered her cell phone while cutting strawberries. After the call, she continued slicing the strawberries for a fruit salad. Week 1: Safety Culture Food The of Directions: Match the example to the correct risk factor for foodborne illness. A Purchasing food from unsafe sources B Failing to cook food correctly C Holding food at incorrect temperatures D Using contaminated equipment E Practicing poor hygiene © 2017 National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation (NRAEF). All rights reserved. ServSafe® and the ServSafe logo are trademarks of NRAEF. National Restaurant Association® and arc design are trademarks of the National Restaurant Association. 17061201 v.1707 September 2017
  6. 6. Sponsored by WHAT IS FOOD SAFETY? 1.___________ Carlo served buttered noodles at 125°F (52°C) from a holding unit. 2.___________ Ashley plated salmon after using a thermometer to check its temperature of 135°F (57°C). 3.___________ Jasmine wore her uniform home but forgot to wash it before starting her shift. 4.___________ Jose formed burger patties on a cutting board and then used the same cutting board to prepare Caesar salads. 5.___________ Alex purchased frozen chicken breasts from his friend who raises chickens and sells their meat from his home. 6.___________ Fawzia answered her cell phone while cutting strawberries. After the call, she continued slicing the strawberries for a fruit salad. Week 1: Safety Culture Food The of Directions: Match the example to the correct risk factor for foodborne illness. A Purchasing food from unsafe sources B Failing to cook food correctly C Holding food at incorrect temperatures D Using contaminated equipment E Practicing poor hygiene © 2017 National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation (NRAEF). All rights reserved. ServSafe® and the ServSafe logo are trademarks of NRAEF. National Restaurant Association® and arc design are trademarks of the National Restaurant Association. 17061201 v.1707 September 2017 C B E D A E
  7. 7. Week 2 – Handwashing • Handwashing is a critical aspect of food safety. Learn how to properly wash your hands and prevent the spread of pathogens. • Activity • Poster • Infographic • Video: https://youtu.be/cchvfrY5AzA
  8. 8. September 2017 Sponsored by Handwashing is the most important part of personal hygiene and is an important part of an operation’s food safety culture. Correct handwashing is critical to preventing the spread of pathogens such as Norovirus and Hepatitis A. 1. Wet hands and arms. Using running, warm water. 4. Rinse hands and arms thoroughly. Use running, warm water. 5. Dry hands and arms. Use a single-use paper towel or a hand dryer. 2. Apply soap. Make sure there is enough soap to build up a good lather. Follow the manufacturer’s recommendations. 3. Scrub hands and arms vigorously for 10 to 15 seconds. Clean the fingertips, under fingernails, and between fingers. Make handwashing an essential part of your operation’s culture by: • Modeling correct behaviors • Giving positive reinforcement • Identifying corrective action • Conducting training and retraining when necessary HANDWASHING Week 2: Follow the steps to wash your hands correctly. © 2017 National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation (NRAEF). All rights reserved. ServSafe® and the ServSafe logo are trademarks of NRAEF. National Restaurant Association® and arc design are trademarks of the National Restaurant Association. 17061201 v.1707 Safety Culture Food The of
  9. 9. September 2017 When it comes to personal hygiene, handwashing is one of the most important steps in preventing the spread of pathogens and cross-contamination. It's also one of the easiest steps! Food handlers must wash their hands before preparing food or working with clean equipment and utensils. They must also wash their hands before putting on single-use gloves. HANDWASHING Using the restroom Leaving and returning to the kitchen/prep areas Clearing tables or busing dirty dishes Make sure to wash your hands after the following activities Safety Culture Food The of Sponsored by © 2017 National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation (NRAEF). All rights reserved. ServSafe® and the ServSafe logo are trademarks of NRAEF. National Restaurant Association® and arc design are trademarks of the National Restaurant Association. 17061201 v.1707 Taking out the garbage Eating, drinking, smoking, or chewing gum or tobacco Handling chemicals that might affect food safety Handling money Sneezing, coughing or using a tissue Touching the body or clothing Handling raw meat, poultry, or seafood
  10. 10. Sponsored by HANDWASHING ____________ ____________ ____________ ____________ ____________ Week 2: Safety Culture Food The of Directions: Number the handwashing steps in the correct order. Scrub hands and arms vigorously for 10 to 15 seconds. Dry hands and arms. Wet hands and arms. Apply soap. Rinse hands and arms thoroughly. © 2017 National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation (NRAEF). All rights reserved. ServSafe® and the ServSafe logo are trademarks of NRAEF. National Restaurant Association® and arc design are trademarks of the National Restaurant Association. 17061201 v.1707 September 2017
  11. 11. HANDWASHING ____________ ____________ ____________ ____________ ____________ Week 2: Safety Culture Food The of Directions: Number the handwashing steps in the correct order. Scrub hands and arms vigorously for 10 to 15 seconds. Dry hands and arms. Wet hands and arms. Apply soap. Rinse hands and arms thoroughly. © 2017 National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation (NRAEF). All rights reserved. ServSafe® and the ServSafe logo are trademarks of NRAEF. National Restaurant Association® and arc design are trademarks of the National Restaurant Association. 17061201 v.1707 September 2017 3 5 1 2 4 Sponsored by
  12. 12. Week 3 - The Role Of Food Safety Training • Check out the many benefits of establishing food safety training in your operation. • Activity • Poster
  13. 13. September 2017 Sponsored by Training employees correctly is critical to the success of a restaurant. Not all restaurant employees are trained on the same things. Some may be trained on menu items and greeting customers while others may be trained on banquet service. However, one area where all employees need training is food safety. All employees, from managers to servers to cooks, need to be trained correctly in food safety. This will help keep guests safe. Week 3: THE ROLE OF FOOD SAFETY TRAINING Correct food safety procedures are monitored and followed. Guests have a positive experience. Food handlers understand correct hygiene. The benefits of food safety training include the following. Employees understand the risks of unsafe food. Procedures are in place and understood for safe food preparation. © 2017 National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation (NRAEF). All rights reserved. ServSafe® and the ServSafe logo are trademarks of NRAEF. National Restaurant Association® and arc design are trademarks of the National Restaurant Association. 17061201 v.1707 Safety Culture Food The of
  14. 14. Sponsored by THE ROLE OF FOOD SAFETY TRAINING Week 3: Safety Culture Food The of Directions: Answer the questions below about your own experiences with food safety training. 1. How often do you receive food safety training at your operation? 2. How is food safety training delivered at your operation? _ For example: Self-study, online, or from a manager. What do you like the most about this delivery _ method, and what do you like the least about this delivery method? 3. Why is food safety training important to you? 4. Are there areas of food safety about which you would like to learn more? © 2017 National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation (NRAEF). All rights reserved. ServSafe® and the ServSafe logo are trademarks of NRAEF. National Restaurant Association® and arc design are trademarks of the National Restaurant Association. 17061201 v.1707 September 2017
  15. 15. Sponsored by THE ROLE OF FOOD SAFETY TRAINING Week 3: Safety Culture Food The of Directions: Answer the questions below about your own experiences with food safety training. 1. How often do you receive food safety training at your operation? 2. How is food safety training delivered at your operation? _ For example: Self-study, online, or from a manager. What do you like the most about this delivery _ method, and what do you like the least about this delivery method? 3. Why is food safety training important to you? 4. Are there areas of food safety about which you would like to learn more? © 2017 National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation (NRAEF). All rights reserved. ServSafe® and the ServSafe logo are trademarks of NRAEF. National Restaurant Association® and arc design are trademarks of the National Restaurant Association. 17061201 v.1707 September 2017 Instructor Note: Student answers will vary depending on their personal views and the operations in which they work. Use these questions to encourage discussion.
  16. 16. Week 4 - Time Temperature Control • Time temperature control is crucial to reduce pathogens in food. Do you know the minimum internal cooking temperatures for different food items? • Activity • Poster • Infographic • Video: https://youtu.be/x7ujUPbMkNw
  17. 17. September 2017 Sponsored by Taking temperatures is a vital part of an operation’s food safety culture, because the only way to reduce pathogens in food to safe levels is to cook the food to its correct minimum internal cooking temperature. The temperature is different for each food item. Once reached, you must hold the food at this temperature for a specific amount of time. TIME TEMPERATURE CONTROL • Poultry—including whole or ground chicken, turkey, or duck • Stuffing made with fish, meat, or poultry • Stuffed meat, seafood, poultry, or pasta • Dishes that include previously cooked TCS ingredients • Ground meat—including beef, pork, and other meat • Injected meat—including brined ham and flavor-injected roasts • Mechanically tenderized meat •Ratites—includingostrichandemu • Ground seafood—including chopped or minced seafood • Shell eggs that will be hot-held for service • Seafood—including fish, shellfish, and crustaceans • Steaks/chops of pork, beef, veal, and lamb • Commercially raised game • Shell eggs that will be served immediately Make taking temperatures an essential part of your operation’s culture by: • Having calibrated thermometers readily available • Modeling correct behaviors • Giving positive reinforcement • Identifying corrective action • Conducting training and retraining when necessary 165° (74°C) for 15 seconds • Roasts of pork, beef, veal, and lamb 145° (63°C) for 4 minutes • Fruit, vegetables, grains (e.g., rice, pasta), and legumes (e.g., beans, refried beans) that will be hot-held for service 135° (57°C) for no minimum time 155° (68°C) for 15 seconds 145° (63°C) for 15 seconds Minimum Cooking Temperatures Safety Culture Food The of Week 4: © 2017 National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation (NRAEF). All rights reserved. ServSafe® and the ServSafe logo are trademarks of NRAEF. National Restaurant Association® and arc design are trademarks of the National Restaurant Association. 17061201 v.1707
  18. 18. September 2017 Taking temperatures is a vital part of an operation’s food safety culture, because the only way to reduce pathogens in food to safe levels is to cook the food to its correct minimum internal cooking temperature. This minimum internal cooking temperature is different for each food item. Once reached, you must hold the food at this temperature for a specific amount of time. Be sure to check out our Week 4 materials to learn more about the specific time temperature requirements for each food item. TIME AND TEMPERATURE CONTROL Keep TCS food outside of the danger zone (410 F and 1350 F; 50 C and 570 C ): • Pathogens grow within this temperature range. • Pathogens grow more rapidly between 700 F and 1250 F; 210 C and 520 C.℃℃ • If food is held in this range for 4+ hours, throw it out. TCS food could be at risk of temperature abuse if it is: • Cooked to the incorrect internal temperature. • Held at the incorrect temperature. • Cooled or reheated incorrectly. Safety Culture Food The of Sponsored by © 2017 National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation (NRAEF). All rights reserved. ServSafe® and the ServSafe logo are trademarks of NRAEF. National Restaurant Association® and arc design are trademarks of the National Restaurant Association. 17061201 v.1707 Avoid time-temperature abuse by practicing the following procedures: • Ensure food handlers know which food items should be checked and how often. • Equip each food handler with the correct thermometers. • Record temperatures regularly and keep a written record of when the temperatures were taken. • Put the thermometer stem into the thickest part of the food. • Calibrate, clean, and sanitize thermometers regularly. • Establish procedures to limit the time food spends in the temperature danger zone (e.g. limit the amount of food that can be removed from a cooler when prepping). • Set a plan for when time and temperature standards are not met.
  19. 19. Sponsored by TIME TEMPERATURE CONTROL Week 4: Safety Culture Food The of Directions: Write the correct minimum required cooking temperature next to the food item. ____________ ____________ ____________ ____________ ____________ ____________ Meat lasagna Cheeseburger Cooked spaghetti Fried shrimp Roast chicken Grilled pork chops 165°F (74°C) 155°F (68°C) 145°F (63°C) 135°F (57°C) © 2017 National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation (NRAEF). All rights reserved. ServSafe® and the ServSafe logo are trademarks of NRAEF. National Restaurant Association® and arc design are trademarks of the National Restaurant Association. 17061201 v.1707 September 2017
  20. 20. Sponsored by TIME TEMPERATURE CONTROL Week 4: Safety Culture Food The of Directions: Write the correct minimum required cooking temperature next to the food item. ____________ ____________ ____________ ____________ ____________ ____________ Meat lasagna Cheeseburger Cooked spaghetti Fried shrimp Roast chicken Grilled pork chops 165°F (74°C) 155°F (68°C) 145°F (63°C) 135°F (57°C) © 2017 National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation (NRAEF). All rights reserved. ServSafe® and the ServSafe logo are trademarks of NRAEF. National Restaurant Association® and arc design are trademarks of the National Restaurant Association. 17061201 v.1707 September 2017 165°F (74°C) 165°F (74°C) 155°F (68°C) 145°F (63°C) 145°F (63°C) 135°F (57°C)

×