Poetry Jeopardy

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Poetry Jeopardy

  1. 1. Jeopardy Topic 1 Topic 2 Topic 3 Topic 4 Topic 5 Topic 6 $100 $100 $100 $100 $100 $100 $200 $200 $200 $200 $200 $200 $300 $300 $300 $300 $300 $300 $400 $400 $400 $400 $400 $400 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 Final Jeopardy
  2. 2. A pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables Back to Game Board Rhythm
  3. 3. A pattern of rhymes Back to Game Board Rhyme Scheme
  4. 4. A word that sounds like what it means Back to Game Board Onomatopoeia
  5. 5. The rhythm established by a poem Back to Game Board Meter
  6. 6. Like paragraphs in prose writing Back to Game Board Stanza
  7. 7. A rhythmic unit Back to Game Board Foot
  8. 8. A 3 line poem with a total of 17 syllables Back to Game Board Haiku
  9. 9. A comparison between two things using “like” or “as” Back to Game Board Simile
  10. 10. The repetition of the ending sounds of words Back to Game Board Rhyme
  11. 11. A figure of speech that uses exaggeration Back to Game Board Hyperbole
  12. 12. The assignment of human qualities to something that is not human Back to Game Board Personification
  13. 13. A poem whose shape visually reflects what the poem is saying Back to Game Board Concrete Poem
  14. 14. A word or phrase used several times Back to Game Board Repetition
  15. 15. A foot with two unaccented syllables followed by a stressed syllable Back to Game Board Anapest
  16. 16. A comparison between two things that does not use the words “like” or “as” Back to Game Board Metaphor
  17. 17. A foot with two syllables, accent on the last Back to Game Board Iamb
  18. 18. Repetition of a consonant sound at the beginning of two or more words Back to Game Board Alliteration
  19. 19. The following lines are an example of this type of figurative language: Lines In a new notebook Run, even and fine, Like telephone wires Across a snowy landscape Back to Game Board Simile
  20. 20. Back to Game Board Personification The following lines are an example of this type of figurative language: Do skyscrapers ever grow tired Of holding themselves up high? Do they ever shiver on frosty nights With their tops against the sky?
  21. 21. The following lines are an example of this type of figurative language: Morning is A new sheet of paper For you to write on. Back to Game Board Metaphor
  22. 22. The following line contains four of this type of feet: Twas the night before Christmas when all through the house. Back to Game Board Anapest
  23. 23. What sound device is used in the following line: “ Slow the low gradual moan came in the snowing.” Back to Game Board Assonance
  24. 24. What type of poem is this: Half mocking the sea the gulls dip within reach of each exploding wave Back to Game Board Haiku
  25. 25. What is the rhyme scheme of the following stanza: The way a crow Shook down on me The dust of snow From a hemlock tree Back to Game Board ABAB
  26. 26. What sound device is used below? Betty Botter had some butter, "But," she said, "this butter's bitter. If I bake this bitter butter, it would make my batter bitter. But a bit of better butter-- that would make my batter better." Back to Game Board Alliteration
  27. 27. “ I need a pickup truck to carry all my books home!” is an example of this form of speech. Back to Game Board Hyperbole
  28. 28. Poems that use the following words are using this sound device: bang, boom, creak, crash, honk, hiss Back to Game Board Onomatopoeia
  29. 29. What type of poem is this: There was once a young fellow of Wall Who grew up so amazingly tall That his friends dug a pit Where he’s happily sit When he wished to converse with them all. Back to Game Board Limerick
  30. 30. What sound device is used in the following poem: Sweet Marie, she loves just me (She also loves Maurice McGhee). No she don’t she loves just me (She also loves Louise Dupree). No she don’t she loves just me (She also loves the willow three). No she don’t she loves just me! (Poor, poor fool, why can’t you see She can love others and still love thee.) Back to Game Board Repetition
  31. 31. What type of poem is this: I have a Band-Aid on my finger, One on my knee, and one on my nose, One on my heel, and two on my shoulder, Three on my elbow, and nine on my toes. Two on my wrist, and one on my ankle, One on my chin, and one on my thigh, Four on my belly, and five on my bottom, One on my forehead, and one on my eye. One on my neck, and in case I might need ‘em I have a box full of thirty-five more. But oh! I do think it’s sort of a pity I don’t have a cut or a sore! Back to Game Board List or Inventory Poem
  32. 32. What two things are thoughts being compared to in this poem? Isn’t it strange some people make You feel so tired inside, Your thoughts begin to shrivel up Like leaves all brown and dried! But when you’re with some other ones, It’s stranger still to find Your thoughts as thick as fireflies All shiny in your mind! Back to Game Board Dried up leaves and fireflies

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