Seven Things

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Seven things I learned at the 2006 AIGA Gain Conference

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Seven Things

  1. 1. 2006 AIGA GAIN CONFERENCE DESIGN MEANS BUSINESS
  2. 2. Really Busy
  3. 3. Seven Lessons Brock Ray
  4. 4. 1) Breaking Down the Silos Moira Cullen, Design Director, Coca-Cola North America
  5. 5. Brand vs. Design
  6. 6. Brand vs. Design Marketing
  7. 7. Brand vs. Design Marketing Production
  8. 8. Brand vs. Design Marketing Production Intangible
  9. 9. Brand vs. Design Marketing Production Intangible Tangible
  10. 10. Brand vs. Design Marketing Production Intangible Tangible Value
  11. 11. Brand vs. Design Marketing Production Intangible Tangible Value Cost
  12. 12. Waste of Time and Money
  13. 13. Myth of the Rational Agent
  14. 14. 70% Emotional
  15. 15. Move Tangibles to Intangibles
  16. 16. Move Tangibles to Intangibles Create Engagements
  17. 17. 4 “P”s
  18. 18. 4 “P”s Product
  19. 19. 4 “P”s Product Price
  20. 20. 4 “P”s Product Price Position
  21. 21. 4 “P”s Product Price Position Place
  22. 22. 4 “P”s Product Price Position Place Commodities
  23. 23. 2 “E”s
  24. 24. 2 “E”s Emotion
  25. 25. 2 “E”s Emotion Engagement
  26. 26. 2 “E”s Emotion Engagement Differentiation
  27. 27. How Do We Do It?
  28. 28. How Do We Do It? Stamina & Perseverance
  29. 29. How Do We Do It? Stamina & Perseverance Personal Relationships
  30. 30. How Do We Do It? Stamina & Perseverance Personal Relationships Understand Other Disciplines
  31. 31. “Design is the communication between brand partners and shareholders to define the brand.” Moira Cullen
  32. 32. 2) All Look, No Feel Michael Hendrix, Tricycle, Inc. Bo Barber, Nood Floorcovering
  33. 33. 1 Carpet Sample = 1 Quart of Oil
  34. 34. Environmental Report Card August 2004 – July 2005 SIM from Tricycle™ Alternative Samples Shipped Gallons of Oil Saved Pounds of Carpet Not Landfilled Saved By Manufacturers
  35. 35. Environmental Report Card August 2004 – July 2005 SIM from Tricycle™ Alternative Samples Shipped 34,443 Gallons of Oil Saved Pounds of Carpet Not Landfilled Saved By Manufacturers
  36. 36. Environmental Report Card August 2004 – July 2005 SIM from Tricycle™ Alternative Samples Shipped 34,443 Gallons of Oil Saved 8,611 Pounds of Carpet Not Landfilled Saved By Manufacturers
  37. 37. Environmental Report Card August 2004 – July 2005 SIM from Tricycle™ Alternative Samples Shipped 34,443 Gallons of Oil Saved 8,611 Pounds of Carpet Not Landfilled 51,665 Saved By Manufacturers
  38. 38. Environmental Report Card August 2004 – July 2005 SIM from Tricycle™ Alternative Samples Shipped 34,443 Gallons of Oil Saved 8,611 Pounds of Carpet Not Landfilled 51,665 Saved By Manufacturers $4,729,825
  39. 39. Nood FloorCovering Green Means Green
  40. 40. Old School Shoppers vs. Designers
  41. 41. New Is Cool Dematerialization and Mass Customization
  42. 42. How It Works
  43. 43. “Design will fail if it’s only lipstick on a pig.” Michael Hendrix
  44. 44. “If a 73-year old gets [Nood], it’s wrong.” Bo Barber
  45. 45. 3) Execute the Obvious to Rise Above the Competition Scott Williams, Starwood Hotels
  46. 46. Complicated Research Process
  47. 47. Complicated Research Process 1. Asked Customers What They Want
  48. 48. Complicated Research Process 1. Asked Customers What They Want 2. Listened
  49. 49. Complicated Research Process 1. Asked Customers What They Want 2. Listened 3. Did It
  50. 50. Heavenly Bed
  51. 51. Hard To See The Obvious
  52. 52. The Problem With Focus Groups Focus groups can be used to tell the CEO that what you think is right
  53. 53. Ethnography [eth-'näg-r&-fE] the scientific description of the customs of individual peoples and cultures
  54. 54. What Marketing Ethnographers Learn
  55. 55. What Marketing Ethnographers Learn How the product is used
  56. 56. What Marketing Ethnographers Learn How the product is used How the product is abused
  57. 57. What Marketing Ethnographers Learn How the product is used How the product is abused What are the user’s expectations
  58. 58. “Buyers are liars!” Scott Williams
  59. 59. 4) The Business Case for Design Harry Rich, Design Council, U.K.
  60. 60. Trust me. I’m a designer.
  61. 61. Trust me. I’m a designer.
  62. 62. Business Performance
  63. 63. Design Council, U.K.
  64. 64. 200% Share Price Outperformance
  65. 65. Don’t Need Exceptional Results
  66. 66. I’m a professional who gets results, so trust me.
  67. 67. “Without design, companies end up competing on price alone, and that is a path to be avoided as it ultimately devalues your product or service.” Harry Rich
  68. 68. 5) Designing in Hostile Territory Roger Martin, Joseph L. Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto
  69. 69. The Fundamental Tension
  70. 70. Reliability Identical Or Consistent Results
  71. 71. Validity Subjective But Accurate Results
  72. 72. Reliability vs. Validity
  73. 73. Reliability vs. Validity Enterprise resource planning
  74. 74. Reliability vs. Validity Enterprise resource planning A robust strategy
  75. 75. Reliability vs. Validity Enterprise resource planning A robust strategy Customer relationship management
  76. 76. Reliability vs. Validity Enterprise resource planning A robust strategy Customer relationship management Customer intimacy
  77. 77. Reliability vs. Validity Enterprise resource planning A robust strategy Customer relationship management Customer intimacy Six Sigma and TQM
  78. 78. Reliability vs. Validity Enterprise resource planning A robust strategy Customer relationship management Customer intimacy Six Sigma and TQM Design excellence
  79. 79. Reliability vs. Validity Enterprise resource planning A robust strategy Customer relationship management Customer intimacy Six Sigma and TQM Design excellence Knowledge management systems
  80. 80. Reliability vs. Validity Enterprise resource planning A robust strategy Customer relationship management Customer intimacy Six Sigma and TQM Design excellence Knowledge management systems Creativity
  81. 81. Reliability vs. Validity Enterprise resource planning A robust strategy Customer relationship management Customer intimacy Six Sigma and TQM Design excellence Knowledge management systems Creativity Incentive compensation
  82. 82. Reliability vs. Validity Enterprise resource planning A robust strategy Customer relationship management Customer intimacy Six Sigma and TQM Design excellence Knowledge management systems Creativity Incentive compensation Jobs that have meaning
  83. 83. Reliability vs. Validity Enterprise resource planning A robust strategy Customer relationship management Customer intimacy Six Sigma and TQM Design excellence Knowledge management systems Creativity Incentive compensation Jobs that have meaning Meeting analysts’ quarterly targets
  84. 84. Reliability vs. Validity Enterprise resource planning A robust strategy Customer relationship management Customer intimacy Six Sigma and TQM Design excellence Knowledge management systems Creativity Incentive compensation Jobs that have meaning Meeting analysts’ quarterly targets A successful company
  85. 85. Five Tools for Designing in Hostile Territory
  86. 86. 1) Take Design Unfriendliness as a Design Challenge
  87. 87. 2) Empathize with the Unfriendly Elements
  88. 88. 3) Speak the Language of Reliability
  89. 89. 4) Use Analogies and Stories
  90. 90. 5) Bite Off as Little a Piece as Possible to Generate Proof
  91. 91. “It's not that corporations don't like or want great design. It's just that when a validity-oriented design comes to an important corporate decision gate, the reliability-oriented question inevitably gets asked: ‘But can we prove this will work?’ Or, ‘How can we be sure this will work?’” Roger Martin
  92. 92. 6) Exporting Fast Food to China LiAnne Yu, Cheskin
  93. 93. Pollo Campero
  94. 94. What Pollo Campero Found
  95. 95. What Pollo Campero Found 1) Chinese Love Pollo Campero Chicken
  96. 96. What Pollo Campero Found 1) Chinese Love Pollo Campero Chicken 2) Don’t Know Anything About Guatemala
  97. 97. What Pollo Campero Found
  98. 98. Proposed Position
  99. 99. Proposed Position 1) Cheap Fried Chicken
  100. 100. Proposed Position 1) Cheap Fried Chicken 2) Eliminate Guatemalan Visuals
  101. 101. Stop
  102. 102. Cultural Immersion
  103. 103. Cultural Immersion Ethnographers Who Speak Both Spanish and Mandarin
  104. 104. Cultural Immersion Ethnographers Who Speak Both Spanish and Mandarin Explore Both Cultures to Identify Similarities
  105. 105. What Cheskin Found
  106. 106. What Cheskin Found 1) U.S. Fast Food No Longer Aspirational
  107. 107. What Cheskin Found 1) U.S. Fast Food No Longer Aspirational 2) Chinese Mourn Loss of Traditional Lifestyle
  108. 108. Revised Position
  109. 109. Revised Position 1) Casual Dining
  110. 110. Revised Position 1) Casual Dining 2) Leverage Latin American Heritage
  111. 111. “While we agree that people can’t always directly describe the product, service or brand they want, they can describe the functions, economics, feelings and meanings they value. They can show you how they live and can point out where their lives could be improved or enriched.” LiAnne Yu
  112. 112. 7) The SHIFT Report™ Kierstin De West, ci: Conscientious Innovation
  113. 113. ci: Conscientious Innovation
  114. 114. The SHIFT Report™
  115. 115. Time
  116. 116. Price
  117. 117. Knowledge
  118. 118. Pressure
  119. 119. Key Findings
  120. 120. Key Findings 1) Consumers Want To Be Told How To Live Sustainably
  121. 121. Key Findings 1) Consumers Want To Be Told How To Live Sustainably 2) Consumers Want Products That Will Help Them Do That
  122. 122. “Brands that understand this consumer and authentically manifest these values are poised to take advantage of an increasingly discerning marketplace.” Kierstin De West
  123. 123. End

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