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Who Controls Bibliographic Control?

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Presentation at ELAG 2011 in Prague, 2011-05-26

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Who Controls Bibliographic Control?

  1. 1. Who Controls Bibliographic Control?-Open Data as Strategy in a Cloud Based Environment<br />Anders Söderbäck,Stockholm University Library<br />
  2. 2. We, the participantsof ELAG 2011, holdsthesetruthsto be self-evident, that MARC must die, and thatLinkedOpen Data is the future.<br />2011-05-26<br />/ Anders Söderbäck, Stockholm universitylibrary<br />
  3. 3. cloud = internet<br />2011-05-26<br />/ Anders Söderbäck, Stockholm universitylibrary<br />
  4. 4. A library is a collectionofsources, resources, and services, and the structure in which it is housed; it is organized for use and maintained by a public body, an institution, or a private individual. <br />http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Library<br />2011-05-26<br />/ Anders Söderbäck, Stockholm universitylibrary<br />
  5. 5. Without data, librariesarenothing!<br />2011-05-26<br />/ Anders Söderbäck, Stockholm universitylibrary<br />
  6. 6. Costofacquisitions at swedish research libraries, 2002 - 2009<br />Digital content<br />Print content<br />2011-05-26<br />/ Anders Söderbäck, Stockholm universitylibrary<br />
  7. 7. 2011-05-26<br />/ Anders Söderbäck, Stockholm universitylibrary<br />
  8. 8. SFX usage in the Samsökconsortia, 2006-2009<br />1717%<br />2011-05-26<br />/ Anders Söderbäck, Stockholm universitylibrary<br />
  9. 9. 1968: Henriette Avraminvents MARC<br />MARC madepossibleseveralinitiatives for cooperationaroundlibrary data<br />1982: A report from IFLA statesthat copyright can not be usedtocontrol a global flowofbibliographicrecords<br />2011-05-26<br />/ Anders Söderbäck, Stockholm universitylibrary<br />
  10. 10. ”...ifeachof the interoperating partners adopts the same set ofagreements for interoperability solutions, eachofthemcanreap the benefitsof a single solution that is developedonce and fits the needof all.”From the EuropeanInteroperabilityFramework v. 1 (2004)<br />2011-05-26<br />/ Anders Söderbäck, Stockholm universitylibrary<br />
  11. 11. Internet<br />Libraries<br />2011-05-26<br />/ Anders Söderbäck, Stockholm universitylibrary<br />
  12. 12. Do youremember web 2.0?<br />2011-05-26<br />/ Anders Söderbäck, Stockholm universitylibrary<br />
  13. 13. Web 2.0 is aboutcontrolling data<br />[Web 2.0] is really about data and who owns and controls, or gives the best access to, a class of data. ... A lot of people still think, "Oh, it's about social networking. It's about blogging. It's about wikis." I think it's about the data that's created by those mechanisms, and the businesses that that data will make possible.<br />- Tim O’Reilly, ”Web 2.0 Is About Controlling Data”,http://bit.ly/bOGCJy<br />2011-05-26<br />/ Anders Söderbäck, Stockholm universitylibrary<br />
  14. 14. Web 2.0 is aboutcontrolling data<br />The Internet business ecosystem can thus be seen as a competition to establish monopolies over various classes of data. ... [Y]ou have to make sure that public data remains public!<br />-Tim O’Reilly, ”Government as Platform”,http://bit.ly/a7gxrM<br />2011-05-26<br />/ Anders Söderbäck, Stockholm universitylibrary<br />
  15. 15. Convergencebetween system and content<br />SaaS, DaaS, PaaS, IaaS, web-scale, etc.<br />Subscription based services in“the cloud”<br />Publishers market services that look like systems (eg. Elsevier SciVerse)<br />System vendors market services that look a lot like what the publishers used to sell us (eg. Summon, Primo Central)<br />Systems depend on aggregations of data<br />License issues are more difficult than technical issues<br />2011-05-26<br />/ Anders Söderbäck, Stockholm universitylibrary<br />
  16. 16. 2011-05-26<br />/ Anders Söderbäck, Stockholm universitylibrary<br />
  17. 17. ”Establishingopen access as a worthwhileprocedureideallyrequires the activecommitmentofeach and everyindividualproducerofscientificknowledge and holderofculturalheritage. Open access contributionsinclude original scientific research results, raw data and metadata, source materials, digital representations ofpictorial and graphical materials and scholarly multimedia material.”<br />From the Berlin declaration on Open Access (2003)<br />2011-05-26<br />/ Anders Söderbäck, Stockholm universitylibrary<br />
  18. 18. OCLC<br />Failedtoimplement a new policy for WorldCat data in 2008<br />Replacedthiswith ”WorldCatRights and Responsibilities for the OCLC Cooperative” in 2010<br />”The factthat OCLC has a public purposedoes not meanthatWorldCat is a ’public good’ in the economic sense.”<br />http://www.oclc.org/worldcat/recorduse/policy/default.htm<br />OCLC is currentlyconsideringlicensingofWorldCatusing ODC - BY<br />2011-05-26<br />/ Anders Söderbäck, Stockholm universitylibrary<br />
  19. 19. Europeana<br />Europeana Public Domain Charter - http://www.version1.europeana.eu/web/europeana-project/publications<br />”OpenMeansOpen” - http://bit.ly/drVw2Y<br />2011-05-26<br />/ Anders Söderbäck, Stockholm universitylibrary<br />
  20. 20. OKFN Working Group on OpenBibliographic Data<br />http://openbiblio.net/principles/<br />http://wiki.okfn.org/wg/bibliography<br />2011-05-26<br />/ Anders Söderbäck, Stockholm universitylibrary<br />
  21. 21. 2011-05-26<br />/ Anders Söderbäck, Stockholm universitylibrary<br />
  22. 22. ”[L]ibrarians shouldprotectthemselves by havingsome checks and balances in theirsupplychain…”<br />- Carl Grant, ExLibris, http://bit.ly/cnmroV<br />2011-05-26<br />/ Anders Söderbäck, Stockholm universitylibrary<br />
  23. 23. ”[W]hen we’redealingwithextremelycomplexprocesses and workflows it is incrediblydifficult, evenimprobable, thatthose software modules from disparatevendorscan match the full range and richfunctionality as when all the modulesareprovided by the same vendor.”<br />- Carl Grant, ExLibris, http://bit.ly/hiJcRC<br />2011-05-26<br />/ Anders Söderbäck, Stockholm universitylibrary<br />
  24. 24. Scenario 1<br />Library metadata areopenlyavailable<br />Librariesare part of a dynamic and flexible ecologyof public institutions, private companies, individuals and parties<br />Knowledge is accessible<br />Purchases and procurementsaredone on an open market<br />Bibliographiccontrol is collaborative, decentralized, international in scope, and Web-based<br />MARC is dead<br />2011-05-26<br />/ Anders Söderbäck, Stockholm universitylibrary<br />
  25. 25. Scenario 2<br />Library metadata arelocked in by restrictivelicenses<br />A feworganizationshave, throughlicensing and mergers, control over access to information resources<br />Libraries (and the public) haveveryweakbargaining position<br />When the monopolies no longerneedlibraries, wearelockedoutof the information ecology<br />MARC is dead, butit doesn’tmatter<br />2011-05-26<br />/ Anders Söderbäck, Stockholm universitylibrary<br />
  26. 26. ”All experiencehathshewn, thatmankindaremoredisposedtosuffer, whileevilsaresufferable, thanto right themselves by abolishing the forms towhichtheyareaccustomed.”<br />2011-05-26<br />/ Anders Söderbäck, Stockholm universitylibrary<br />
  27. 27. ”Butwhen a long trainofabuses and usurpations, pursuinginvariably the same Objectevinces a design toreducethem under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is theirduty, tothrow off suchGovernment, and toprovide new guards for theirfuturesecurity.”<br />2011-05-26<br />/ Anders Söderbäck, Stockholm universitylibrary<br />

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