Ancient egyptian religion

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Ancient egyptian religion

  1. 1. Ancient Egyptian Religion Berk Barlak
  2. 2. Ancient Egyptian Religion • Religion provided the Egyptians with a sense of security and timelessness. They had no word for religion. For them, religious ideas represented an inseparable part of the entire world order. The Egyptians were polytheistic. They had a number of gods associated with heavenly bodies and natural forces. Two groups, sun gods and land gods (including river gods), came to have special significance in view of the importance of the sun and the fertile land along the Nile to Egypt’s wellbeing.
  3. 3. Ancient Egyptian Religion • The sun, the source of life, was worthy of worship. The sun god took on different forms and names based on his role. The Egyptian ruler took the title “Son of Re.” The rulers were seen as an earthly form of Re, one of the sun god’s names.
  4. 4. Ancient Egyptian Religion • River and land gods included Osiris and Isis. A famous myth told of the struggle between Osiris, who brought civilization to Egypt, and his evil brother Seth. When Seth cut Osiris into pieces and tossed them into the Nile, Isis, Osiris’s wife, found the pieces. With help from other gods, she brought Osiris back to life. Osiris became a symbol of resurrection, or rebirth. By identifying with Osiris, Egyptians hoped to gain new life after death. The dead were placed in tombs (in the case of kings, in pyramid tombs) and through rituals would become Osiris. Like Osiris, they would then be reborn. The flooding of the Nile and the new life that it brought to Egypt were symbolized by Isis’s bringing all of Osiris’s parts together each spring in the festival of the new land.
  5. 5. Source • World History-Student Edition (2007) pg.(3536)

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