1er proyecto de investigación en Kent

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Les presento el primer trabajo de investigación que hemos realizado en equipo con mis compañeros de la Maestría.

Una investigación completa sobre el problema de alimentación en la Universidad de Kent State, las razones, motivos y circunstancias que llevan a que un alto número de la población universitaria tenga una pobre alimentación especialmente durante el invierno.

El proceso inició con un sondeo y nos llevo a utilizar diferentes métodos de investigación y análisis de información para llegar a un punto en el que se tiene una idea de las posibilidades para intervenir el problema.

La culminación de este ejercicio fué llegar a proponer las áreas de futuro análisis e intervención con diseño. A partir de aquí debería iniciarse un proceso de lluvia de ideas, creación de prototipos, prueba de los mismos y diseño final.

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1er proyecto de investigación en Kent

  1. 1. Hungry?An investigation intothe Health and Wellness ofKent State University students
  2. 2. 01 Task Definition: Initial Research to Define the Problem
  3. 3. Task Definition Initial Research· How is obesity defined? SOURCES SCHOLARLY JOURNALS· What causes people to become overweight? RESEARCH BOOKS NEWS ARTICLES· How available are healthy food options? DOCUMENTARIES· How do people make food choices?· What are people’s priorities?· What role does ethnicity play?· How do people view fitness?· How does Public Policy affect obesity?· How does genetics affect weight gain?· How does marketing and TV affect people?Hungry? | Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Schwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni Acayo November 17, 2011
  4. 4. Task Definition Initial Research“Weight gain and obesity are caused by consuming more calories than the body needs —most commonly by eating a diet high in fat and calories, living a sedentary lifestyle, or both.” http://www.obesityinamerica.org/understandingObesity/index.cfm “In the United States, 64.5% of adults and 15% of children ages 6–19 are overweight. Dieting is rampant, but most who lose weight gain it back. Some experts blame ever-increasing portion sizes and the proliferation of tasty, high-calorie fast foods that make it all too easy to eat a day’s worth of calories in one supersize meal.” http://www.nytimes.com/2002/11/26/science/why-we-eat-and-eat-and-eat.html?pagewanted=all&src=pm“The grocery store is set up in a way to get you to purchase what they want you to place in your cart. Whether you want to or not. Some of these items can be healthy but, unfortunately, most are not.” http://articles.latimes.com/2011/jul/17/health/la-he-food-deserts-20110712 “The cheapest calories come from fried foods, chips and sodas” http://articles.latimes.com/2011/jul/17/health/la-he-food-deserts-20110712“The heavier one’s friends, the higher one’s own chances of becoming overweight... How is that transmitted to you? By sharing behavior... It’s either ‘Let’s go running’ or‘Let’s share these muffins.’” http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/36281026/ns/health-diet_and_nutrition/t/why-we-eat-when-were-not-hungry/#.TsEjfGAgxD5Hungry? | Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Schwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni Acayo November 17, 2011
  5. 5. Task De nition Task Definition Assumptions Map Map 1.2 Assumptions MARKETING PERCEPTIONS EDUCATION PRIORITIES FOOD · Growing portion sizes ·  Energy dense foods should be rewards ·  Poor out of home choices ·  Spend less money on food = bad food ·  Availability and accesability of food ·  Cost of dieting ·  Blaming only sugar ·  Breakdown mealtimes with family ·  Purchasing environments ·  Improper drinking soft drinks ·  Food budget ·  Sweets are a given ·  Poor family eating habits ·  Commercials push fast & processed food ·  Misseducated “poor woman” ·  Cooking is now something you watch ·  Concepts of“diet” and “dieting” ·  Kids eat out of boredom, stress, or pres- sure ·  Grocery stores push unhealthy foods ·  Portion controlled packages = overeating ·  Making poor eating decisions ·  Shop @more $$grocery stores = skinny FITNESS ·  Quick fixes vrs exercise ·  Exercise is too difficult ·  Weight-loss and body building ·  Pay less for gym ·  Physical activity is a spectator sport ·  Sports nos as available for adults ·  Improper prioritizing of income and time. ·  Too many choices for fitness ·  Boredom of routine · ·  Not enough results ·  Fear of failure ·  Too out of shape for exersices ·  Body image ·  Fear of exercise equipment ·  No entertainment in exercise ·  Public embarrassment ·  Insegurities @GymThe Plus Sized Problem | Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Schwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni Acayo November 17, 2011Hungry? | Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Schwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni Acayo November 17, 2011
  6. 6. Task De nition Task Definition 1.2 Assumptions Map Assumptions Map MARKETING PERCEPTIONS EDUCATION PRIORITIES FOOD MARKETING · Growing portion sizes PERCEPTIONS foods should be rewards · Energy dense EDUCATION home choices · Poor out of PRIORITIES money on food = bad food · Spend less · Availability and accesability of food · Cost of dieting · Blaming only sugar · Breakdown mealtimes with family FOOD · Purchasing environments · Growing portion sizes ·  Energy dense foods should be rewards ·  Poor out of home choices · Improper drinking soft drinks ·  Spend less money on food = bad food · Food budget ·  Availabilityaand accesability of food · Sweets are given ·  Cost of dieting ·  Blaming only sugar · Poor family eating habits ·  Breakdown mealtimes with family ·  Purchasing environments · Commercials push fast & processed food ·  Improper drinking soft drinks · Misseducated “poor woman” ·  Food budget ·  Sweets arenow something you watch · Cooking is a given ·  Poor family eating habits · Concepts of“diet” and “dieting” ·  Commercials push fast & processed food · Kids eat out of boredom, stress, or pressure ·  Misseducated “poor woman” ·  Cooking stores push unhealthy foods · Grocery is now something you watch ·  Concepts of“diet” and “dieting” ·  Kids eat out of boredom, stress, or pres- · Portion controlled packages = overeating sure · Making poor eating decisions ·  Grocery stores push unhealthy foods · Shop @more $$grocery stores = skinny ·  Portion controlled packages = overeating FITNESS ·  Makingxes vrs exercise · Quick poor eating decisions · Exercise is too di cult · Weight-loss and body building · Pay less for gym ·  Shop @more $$grocery stores = skinny · Physical activity is a spectator sport · Sports nos as available for adults · Improper prioritizing of income and time. · Too many choices for tness · Boredom of routine FITNESS ·  Quick fixes vrs exercise ·  Exercise is too difficult ·  Weight-loss and body building ·  Pay less· for gym · Not enough results ·  Physical activity is a spectator sport ·  Sports failure available for adults · Fear of nos as ·  Improper prioritizing of income and time. ·  Too many choices for fitness ·  Boredom of routine exersices · Too out of shape for · ·  Not enough results · Body image ·  Fear of exercise equipment · Fear of failure ·  Tooentertainmentfor exercise · No out of shape in exersices ·  Body image · Public embarrassment ·  Fear of exercise equipment · Insegurities @Gym ·  No entertainment in exercise FOOD AND FITNESS Unrealistic diets and exercise ·  Public embarrassment · Systems are intimidating · Not reasonable goals · Lack of commitment Body images ·  Insegurities @Gym · Desire quick x · Dietary education · Lack of motivation to change lifestyle · Acceptance · Di erences in weight-loss techniques · “Being healthy” concept · Dieting trends = regain weightThe Plus Sized Problem | Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Schwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni Acayo November 17, 2011Hungry? | Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Schwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni Acayo November 17, 2011
  7. 7. Task Definition Information Problem We believe through education we can circumvent marketing to change our perceptions and prioroties towards a healthy lifestyleHungry? | Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Schwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni Acayo November 17, 2011
  8. 8. 02 Information Seeking Strategies: How Will We Get the Informaton We Need?
  9. 9. Information Seeking Strategies Selecting the Best Sources Students who live on campus AVOIDED AREAS Opportunities: FITNESS CENTER - Easily accessible crowd to seek information from OFF-CAMPUS RESTAURANTS - Heavily influenced by what happens on campus, since campus is their home - Have different lifestyles, priorities, and facilities than students living off-campus OFF-CAMPUS SHOPPING CENTERS - Known factors in regard to the facilities they access for food. APARTMENT DWELLERS - More opportunities to interject solutions to college facilities - Internal “Kent Campus” lifestyle is easier to understand COMMUTERS GRADUATE STUDENTS Drawbacks: FACULTY - Will not account for any experiences off campus in restaurants and shopping facilities - Will be focused more towards freshman, since they are the majority of on-campus students EXERCISE ROUTINESHungry? | Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Schwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni Acayo November 17, 2011
  10. 10. Information Seeking Strategies Figure A. Kent State University Campus Map Areas to Target on Campus Prentice Hall Food Court and Shopping Market Reason: Accessed more often by upperclassman Prentice Hall Student Center Tri-Towers Food Court, Mini Market, Cafeteria, and (2) Restaurants Student Reason: Largest eating destination on campus, Center accessed by all students on campus Eastway Tri-Towers Center Rosie’s Restaurant, Shopping Market Reason: Late night hours, many unhealthy made to order options Eastway Center Shopping Market and Deli, Cafeteria Reason: Largest market on campus, also targeted the most to freshman. Food Purchasing DormsHungry? | Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Schwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni Acayo November 17, 2011
  11. 11. Determining the Sources Information Seeking Strategies Surveys Objective To understand the influences that lead to poor health habits on campus Reason To reach a large number of students for a better understanding of the “average.” To ask some sensitive questions that might be difficult to answer in an interview. Additional Secondary Research Objective To understand university policies on food plans and when and where they can be used Reason This information is published and easily available online. Card Sorting Objective To understand the priorities of eating healthy Reason By ranking items, we can quickly gather data that will give us insights into more important factors of a healthy lifestyleHungry? | Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Schwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni Acayo November 17, 2011
  12. 12. Determining the Sources Information Seeking Strategies Self Photo Ethnography Objective To document student eating habits and food shopping environments Reason Understand the connection between eating environments and students choices. Shadowing Objective To document the shopping process. Reason To help establish when the student makes poor decisions Interviews Objective To gain deeper insights into students perceptions of healthy eating and how it connects to campus life. Reason To improvise the conversation in different directions based on the students comfort talking about this subject.Hungry? | Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Schwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni Acayo November 17, 2011
  13. 13. 03 Location and Access: Research Strategy Plan
  14. 14. Location and Access Research Logic Model DATE 10/11 - 10/25 10/25 - 10/3 11/3 - 11/9 11/3 - 11/9 11/3 - 11/9 Initial Research Literature review Initial Observations and Public Intercepts Revised Intercepts Photo Ethnography PURPOSE To get an initial understanding of the To gain a deeper and more specific People don’t always do what they say, so Get a preliminary idea of what the Gain a deeper understanding of people’s topic. understanding of the problem in relation this is give us first hand insight into student’s thoughts and ideas are motivations and priorities with revised to KSU students. what people are actually doing. towards their food and exercise choices. tactics based off of initial intercepts. ACTIONS Secondary Research: Food Places to observe: Places to conduct Intercepts: Places to conduct Intercepts: • Journals • Understand the meal plan options— • Student center food court and dinning. • Student Center • Prentice • Scholarly articles where its used, how much it costs, are • East way dinning hall and grocery store • Dorms • Student Center • Books on obesity they obligated to have a meal plan. especially during lunch and dinner • East way Dinning and market • Publications • Find out what the food options are on hours, dinning • Prentice Methods: • Blogs campus and the economics of the • Rosies • Randomly ask people questions various choices. Methods: • Card sorting • Websites: NIH, Obesity in America • Figure out the flashcard system— • Observations Methods: • Shadow people while they shop or eat. (compile bibliography for these findings) where it is accepted, what the • Photo ethnography • Randomly ask people questions restrictions are if any to using it. • Note taking • Staff/workers at various food locations • Dorms and apartments— • Shadow people while they shop or eat Understand what facilities are available • One-on-one interviews to students for cooking and storing food. OUTCOME • Areas of interest: • Make contacts to help further our • Gain an initial understanding of how • Use this experience to better • Use this experience to better Marketing, priorities, perceptions, primary research. students are using the available understand how to approach students understand how to approach students Education (Location and Time). • Understand the campus food situation facilities and services. in future intercepts. in future intercepts. • KSU students were chosen as the target better in order to build better questions • Find trends to ask further questions • Narrow focus on target group based on • Narrow focus on target group based on audience because of easy access. for the intercepts. later about motivations and goals. findings in order to better focus the findings in order to better focus the • Led to realization of information still • Further narrow down a target audience, second round of intercepts. second round of intercepts. needed. even if only slightly. • Gain a better understanding of the • Gain a better understanding of the • The majority of the factors affecting situation at hand. situation at hand. obesity fell into two major categories: • Find trends to lead to card sorting of • Find trends to lead to card sorting of food and exercise motivations and priorities. motivations and priorities.Hungry? | Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Schwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni Acayo November 17, 2011
  15. 15. Location and Access Research Logic Model DATE 10/11 - 10/25 10/25 - 10/3 11/3 - 11/9 11/3 - 11/9 11/3 - 11/9 Initial Research Literature review Initial Observations and Public Intercepts Revised Intercepts Photo Ethnography PURPOSE To get an initial understanding of the To gain a deeper and more specific People don’t always do what they say, so Get a preliminary idea of what the Gain a deeper understanding of people’s topic. understanding of the problem in relation this is give us first hand insight into student’s thoughts and ideas are motivations and priorities with revised to KSU students. what people are actually doing. towards their food and exercise choices. tactics based off of initial intercepts. ACTIONS Secondary Research: Food Places to observe: Places to conduct Intercepts: Places to conduct Intercepts: • Journals • Understand the meal plan options— • Student center food court and dinning. • Student Center • Prentice • Scholarly articles where its used, how much it costs, are • East way dinning hall and grocery store • Dorms • Student Center • Books on obesity they obligated to have a meal plan. especially during lunch and dinner • East way Dinning and market • Publications • Find out what the food options are on hours, dinning • Prentice Methods: • Blogs campus and the economics of the • Rosies • Randomly ask people questions various choices. Methods: • Card sorting • Websites: NIH, Obesity in America • Figure out the flashcard system— • Observations Methods: • Shadow people while they shop or eat. (compile bibliography for these findings) where it is accepted, what the • Photo ethnography • Randomly ask people questions restrictions are if any to using it. • Note taking • Staff/workers at various food locations • Dorms and apartments— • Shadow people while they shop or eat Understand what facilities are available • One-on-one interviews to students for cooking and storing food. OUTCOME • Areas of interest: • Make contacts to help further our • Gain an initial understanding of how • Use this experience to better • Use this experience to better Marketing, priorities, perceptions, primary research. students are using the available understand how to approach students understand how to approach students Education (Location and Time). • Understand the campus food situation facilities and services. in future intercepts. in future intercepts. • KSU students were chosen as the target better in order to build better questions • Find trends to ask further questions • Narrow focus on target group based on • Narrow focus on target group based on audience because of easy access. for the intercepts. later about motivations and goals. findings in order to better focus the findings in order to better focus the • Led to realization of information still • Further narrow down a target audience, second round of intercepts. second round of intercepts. needed. even if only slightly. • Gain a better understanding of the • Gain a better understanding of the • The majority of the factors affecting situation at hand. situation at hand. obesity fell into two major categories: • Find trends to lead to card sorting of • Find trends to lead to card sorting of food and exercise motivations and priorities. motivations and priorities.Hungry? | Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Schwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni Acayo November 17, 2011
  16. 16. Location and Access Research Logic Model DATE 10/11 - 10/25 10/25 - 10/3 11/3 - 11/9 11/3 - 11/9 11/3 - 11/9 Initial Research Literature review Initial Observations and Public Intercepts Revised Intercepts Photo Ethnography PURPOSE To get an initial understanding of the To gain a deeper and more specific People don’t always do what they say, so Get a preliminary idea of what the Gain a deeper understanding of people’s topic. understanding of the problem in relation this is give us first hand insight into student’s thoughts and ideas are motivations and priorities with revised to KSU students. what people are actually doing. towards their food and exercise choices. tactics based off of initial intercepts. ACTIONS Secondary Research: Food Places to observe: Places to conduct Intercepts: Places to conduct Intercepts: • Journals • Understand the meal plan options— • Student center food court and dinning. • Student Center • Prentice • Scholarly articles where its used, how much it costs, are • East way dinning hall and grocery store • Dorms • Student Center • Books on obesity they obligated to have a meal plan. especially during lunch and dinner • East way Dinning and market • Publications • Find out what the food options are on hours, dinning • Prentice Methods: • Blogs campus and the economics of the • Rosies • Randomly ask people questions various choices. Methods: • Card sorting • Websites: NIH, Obesity in America • Figure out the flashcard system— • Observations Methods: • Shadow people while they shop or eat. (compile bibliography for these findings) where it is accepted, what the • Photo ethnography • Randomly ask people questions restrictions are if any to using it. • Note taking • Staff/workers at various food locations • Dorms and apartments— • Shadow people while they shop or eat Understand what facilities are available • One-on-one interviews to students for cooking and storing food. OUTCOME • Areas of interest: • Make contacts to help further our • Gain an initial understanding of how • Use this experience to better • Use this experience to better Marketing, priorities, perceptions, primary research. students are using the available understand how to approach students understand how to approach students Education (Location and Time). • Understand the campus food situation facilities and services. in future intercepts. in future intercepts. • KSU students were chosen as the target better in order to build better questions • Find trends to ask further questions • Narrow focus on target group based on • Narrow focus on target group based on audience because of easy access. for the intercepts. later about motivations and goals. findings in order to better focus the findings in order to better focus the • Led to realization of information still • Further narrow down a target audience, second round of intercepts. second round of intercepts. needed. even if only slightly. • Gain a better understanding of the • Gain a better understanding of the • The majority of the factors affecting situation at hand. situation at hand. obesity fell into two major categories: • Find trends to lead to card sorting of • Find trends to lead to card sorting of food and exercise motivations and priorities. motivations and priorities.Hungry? | Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Schwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni Acayo November 17, 2011
  17. 17. Location and Access Research Logic Model DATE 10/11 - 10/25 10/25 - 10/3 11/3 - 11/9 11/3 - 11/9 11/3 - 11/9 Initial Research Literature review Initial Observations and Public Intercepts Revised Intercepts Photo Ethnography PURPOSE To get an initial understanding of the To gain a deeper and more specific People don’t always do what they say, so Get a preliminary idea of what the Gain a deeper understanding of people’s topic. understanding of the problem in relation this is give us first hand insight into student’s thoughts and ideas are motivations and priorities with revised to KSU students. what people are actually doing. towards their food and exercise choices. tactics based off of initial intercepts. ACTIONS Secondary Research: Food Places to observe: Places to conduct Intercepts: Places to conduct Intercepts: • Journals • Understand the meal plan options— • Student center food court and dinning. • Student Center • Prentice • Scholarly articles where its used, how much it costs, are • East way dinning hall and grocery store • Dorms • Student Center • Books on obesity they obligated to have a meal plan. especially during lunch and dinner • East way Dinning and market • Publications • Find out what the food options are on hours, dinning • Prentice Methods: • Blogs campus and the economics of the • Rosies • Randomly ask people questions various choices. Methods: • Card sorting • Websites: NIH, Obesity in America • Figure out the flashcard system— • Observations Methods: • Shadow people while they shop or eat. (compile bibliography for these findings) where it is accepted, what the • Photo ethnography • Randomly ask people questions restrictions are if any to using it. • Note taking • Staff/workers at various food locations • Dorms and apartments— • Shadow people while they shop or eat Understand what facilities are available • One-on-one interviews to students for cooking and storing food. OUTCOME • Areas of interest: • Make contacts to help further our • Gain an initial understanding of how • Use this experience to better • Use this experience to better Marketing, priorities, perceptions, primary research. students are using the available understand how to approach students understand how to approach students Education (Location and Time). • Understand the campus food situation facilities and services. in future intercepts. in future intercepts. • KSU students were chosen as the target better in order to build better questions • Find trends to ask further questions • Narrow focus on target group based on • Narrow focus on target group based on audience because of easy access. for the intercepts. later about motivations and goals. findings in order to better focus the findings in order to better focus the • Led to realization of information still • Further narrow down a target audience, second round of intercepts. second round of intercepts. needed. even if only slightly. • Gain a better understanding of the • Gain a better understanding of the • The majority of the factors affecting situation at hand. situation at hand. obesity fell into two major categories: • Find trends to lead to card sorting of • Find trends to lead to card sorting of food and exercise motivations and priorities. motivations and priorities.Hungry? | Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Schwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni Acayo November 17, 2011
  18. 18. Location and Access Research Logic Model DATE 10/11 - 10/25 10/25 - 10/3 11/3 - 11/9 11/3 - 11/9 11/3 - 11/9 Initial Research Literature review Initial Observations and Public Intercepts Revised Intercepts Photo Ethnography PURPOSE To get an initial understanding of the To gain a deeper and more specific People don’t always do what they say, so Get a preliminary idea of what the Gain a deeper understanding of people’s topic. understanding of the problem in relation this is give us first hand insight into student’s thoughts and ideas are motivations and priorities with revised to KSU students. what people are actually doing. towards their food and exercise choices. tactics based off of initial intercepts. ACTIONS Secondary Research: Food Places to observe: Places to conduct Intercepts: Places to conduct Intercepts: • Journals • Understand the meal plan options— • Student center food court and dinning. • Student Center • Prentice • Scholarly articles where its used, how much it costs, are • East way dinning hall and grocery store • Dorms • Student Center • Books on obesity they obligated to have a meal plan. especially during lunch and dinner • East way Dinning and market • Publications • Find out what the food options are on hours, dinning • Prentice Methods: • Blogs campus and the economics of the • Rosies • Randomly ask people questions various choices. Methods: • Card sorting • Websites: NIH, Obesity in America • Figure out the flashcard system— • Observations Methods: • Shadow people while they shop or eat. (compile bibliography for these findings) where it is accepted, what the • Photo ethnography • Randomly ask people questions restrictions are if any to using it. • Note taking • Staff/workers at various food locations • Dorms and apartments— • Shadow people while they shop or eat Understand what facilities are available • One-on-one interviews to students for cooking and storing food. OUTCOME • Areas of interest: • Make contacts to help further our • Gain an initial understanding of how • Use this experience to better • Use this experience to better Marketing, priorities, perceptions, primary research. students are using the available understand how to approach students understand how to approach students Education (Location and Time). • Understand the campus food situation facilities and services. in future intercepts. in future intercepts. • KSU students were chosen as the target better in order to build better questions • Find trends to ask further questions • Narrow focus on target group based on • Narrow focus on target group based on audience because of easy access. for the intercepts. later about motivations and goals. findings in order to better focus the findings in order to better focus the • Led to realization of information still • Further narrow down a target audience, second round of intercepts. second round of intercepts. needed. even if only slightly. • Gain a better understanding of the • Gain a better understanding of the • The majority of the factors affecting situation at hand. situation at hand. obesity fell into two major categories: • Find trends to lead to card sorting of • Find trends to lead to card sorting of food and exercise motivations and priorities. motivations and priorities.Hungry? | Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Schwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni Acayo November 17, 2011
  19. 19. 04 Execution of Methods: Documentation and Extraction
  20. 20. Use of Information Written and Photo Ethnography Use of Information 4.1 Written and Photo Ethnography !"#$%"& ()*+,Hungry? | Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Schwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni Acayo November 17, 2011 The Plus Sized Problem | Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Schwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni Acayo November 17, 2011
  21. 21. Use of Information Information Written andand Photo Ethnography 4.1 Written Photo Ethnography !"#$%"& -(.éHungry? Adina Feigenbaum, Feigenbaum, Andy Diego Brito, Peni Brito,The Plus |Sized Problem | Adina Andy Schwanbeck,Schwanbeck, DiegoAcayo Peni Acayo November 17, 2011 November 17, 2011
  22. 22. Use of Information Food Shopping Maps EASTWAY MARKET CHECKOUT/CANDY DELI CHIPS SODA MILK FROZEN TREATS SHAKE COOKIES/SWEET TREATS CANDY DELI MEATS CANNED FOOD CONDIMENTS CANDY SODA NON-FOOD ITEMS CHIPS CANDY HEALTH DRINKS CEREAL SODA CHIPSHungry? | Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Schwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni Acayo November 17, 2011
  23. 23. Use of Information Use of Information Written and Photo Ethnography 4.1 Written and Photo Ethnography /////// 01!2$3-!/ ()*+,Hungry? | Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Schwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni Acayo November 17, 2011The Plus Sized Problem | Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Schwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni Acayo November 17, 2011
  24. 24. Use of of Information Use Information Written and Photo Ethnography 4.1 Written and Photo Ethnography 415-!1&// #$51!/6/7"18!$Hungry? | Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Schwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni Acayo November 17, 2011 The Plus Sized Problem | Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Schwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni Acayo November 17, 2011
  25. 25. Use of Information Use of Information Written and Photo Ethnography Written and Photo Ethnography /01!2$3-!/ -(.éHungry? | Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Schwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni Acayo November 17, 2011The Plus Sized Problem | Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Schwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni Acayo November 17, 2011
  26. 26. Use of Information Food Shopping Maps PRENTICE HALL MARKET PRENTICE HALL DINING AREA BREAD FROZEN FOOD DELI FROZEN FOOD SODA SODA SODA DESSERTS FROZEN TREATS CHIPS CANDY CASHIER CASHIER SALAD BAR COOKIES/CANDY COOKIES/CANDY JUICE / CHIPS PACKAGED FOOD CHIPS SODA SODA CHIPS SODA CHIPS POT-PIE PIZZA TACOS & BURGERS/FRIES BURRITOS POTATO CHIPS SODA POP 1000 CALORIES AVERAGE PER BAG 100-1000 CALORIES DEPENDING ON SIZEHungry? | Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Schwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni Acayo November 17, 2011
  27. 27. Use of Information Use of Information Written and Photo Ethnography Written and Photo Ethnography / #$9:!2$/-!2$!1 ;<=/(>?/*+>,/()*+,/3/6/33Hungry? | Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Schwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni Acayo November 17, 2011The Plus Sized Problem | Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Schwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni Acayo November 17, 2011
  28. 28. Use of Information Use of Information Written and Photo Ethnography Written and Photo Ethnography / #$9:!2$/-!2$!1 #@AB+=+C/(>?/:(D>EF/4)GCC Hungry? | Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Schwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni Acayo November 17, 2011The Plus Sized Problem | Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Schwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni Acayo November 17, 2011
  29. 29. Use ofof Information Use Information Written and Photo Ethnography Written and Photo Ethnography 15#3!E# :G>>+) Hungry? | Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Schwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni AcayoThe Plus Sized Problem | Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Schwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni Acayo November 17, 2011 November 17, 2011
  30. 30. Use of Information Use of Information Written and Photo Ethnography Written and Photo Ethnography 15#3!E# 7()*+,The Plus Sized Problem | Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Schwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni Acayo November 17, 2011Hungry? | Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Schwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni Acayo November 17, 2011
  31. 31. Execution of Methods Documentation and ExtractionHungry? | Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Schwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni Acayo November 17, 2011
  32. 32. Use of Information Intercepts THINGS PEOPLE BOUGHT Lifestyle· YOGURT “We have a football party every Sunday with cookies and danish”· CEREAL· MILK· ORANGE JUICE Money· PROTEIN BARS “Swipe and forget”· DIP (B/C IT WAS CUTE)· RICE Health· OREOS “Dude! You know how many calories are in that???” “Man, you know· FROZEN MEALS· POP I have the basic meal-plan...”· JUICE “I think healthy means a salad. I try to eat one for lunch,· GATERADE but dinner is a different story”· SOBE LIFE WATER “I think that Salad, Water, and Gaterade are considered healthy”· CHEESCAKE IN A CUP· CANDY “I think that my diet is Unhealthy, but it’s the same as high school”· CHICKEN POT PIE “Lucky Charms are my guilty pleasure, but in general I try to eat healthy”· FRIES “I look for healthier options; things not fried”· POP “If you think that eating a bag of Snickers is healthy, you are just crazy!”· LETTUCE· BREAD-STICKS “What’s healthy is just common sense”· PASTA WITH VEGGIES “I am the one everyone hates” (girl who eats junk but is skinny)· CHICKEN FINGERS “I’m a college student, we eat everything”Hungry? | Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Schwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni Acayo November 17, 2011
  33. 33. Use of Information Intercepts Incites· Group influence when eating decisions are made (one friend picks bad choice, and everyone else follows).· Only one person shopped with a list, and only one person read nutrition labels.· Seems most people pack breakfast and snacks, but purchase lunch and dinner.· Some choose food by the way it looks, and some chose food based on line lengths.· Learned eating habits from friends and family.· People seemed health conscious, though their actions did not always align.· Student’s definitions of healthy were not always accurate.Hungry? | Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Schwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni Acayo November 17, 2011
  34. 34. Use of Information Card Sorting Summary Card sorting became a way for us to validate our initial intercept findings as well as gather any information that we missed in our previous techniques. The process proved to be a useful way for us to quantify results quickly. Questions Questions Where do your perceptions of health come from? How do you choose what you eat? Where do you eat your meals? - The top answer is in apartment/dorm room - Ranking 3 out of 4 was on the go Who do you eat with? - 71% responded alone, 42% responded with a friend or multiple friendsHungry? | Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Schwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni Acayo November 17, 2011
  35. 35. Use of Information Food Plan UsageCHART ILLUSTRATING MEAL PLAN USAGE AND HOURS OF OPERATION AT THE DIFFERENT ONCAMPUS LOCATIONS BREAK FAST LUNCH DINNER LATE DINNERMon - Fri 7am 8am 9am 10am Noon 1pm 2pm 3pm 4pm 5pm 6pm 7pm 8pm 9pm 10pm 12am 1am 2am 3am 4am 5am 6amEast way CaféEast Way MarketPrentice CaféMunchies MarketRosies DinerRosies MarketStudent Center hubKent Market IKent Market IIThird Floor Shwabel Can’t Use Meal plan Hours of operation ClosedHungry? | Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Schwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni Acayo November 17, 2011
  36. 36. Use of Information Food Plan UsageCHART ILLUSTRATING MEAL PLAN USAGE AND HOURS OF OPERATION AT THE DIFFERENT ONCAMPUS LOCATIONS Premier Plus Plan $2350 BREAK FAST LUNCH DINNER LATE DINNERMon - Fri 7am 8am 9am 10am Noon 1pm 2pm 3pm 4pm 5pm 6pm 7pm 8pm 9pm 10pm 12am 1am 2am 3am 4am 5am 6amEast way CaféEast Way Market Premier Plan $2,000Prentice CaféMunchies MarketRosies DinerRosies MarketStudent Center hub Basic PlanKent Market I $1,695Kent Market IIThird Floor Shwabel Lite Plan Can’t Use Meal plan $1,555 Hours of operation ClosedHungry? | Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Schwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni Acayo November 17, 2011
  37. 37. 05 Synthesis: Creating an Experience Model for Design Interjection
  38. 38. Synthesis Synthesis Charting the 5 E’s 5.1 Charting the 5 E’s Summary The overall experience chart of food interaction shows that there may be opportunities for design interjection in the “Enter” and “Exit” experience Entice Enter Engage Exit Extend PEOPLE ENVIRONMENTHungry? | AdinaSized Problem |Andy Schwanbeck, DiegoSchwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni Acayo The Plus Feigenbaum, Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Brito, Peni Acayo November 17, 2011 2011 November 17,
  39. 39. Synthesis Charting the 5 E’s Summary The overall experience chart of food interaction shows that there may be opportunities for design interjection in the “Enter” and “Exit” experience Entice Enter Engage Exit Extend PEOPLE ENVIRONMENTHungry? | Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Schwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni Acayo November 17, 2011
  40. 40. Synthesis Convenience OBSERVATIONS OPPORTUNITIES ENTICE 10 ENTER EXIT 9 8 7 6 5 PRIORITY LEVEL ENGAGE 4 EXTEND 3 2 1 ENTICE - Observations: Location & Proximity to home and routine, How crowded a particular destination is - Opportunities: Provide more mobile healthy food ENTER - Observations: Signage, Food Placement, Specials, Point of Purchase Displays, Lines for different food options - Opportunities: Promote grab and go options with attractive signage and up front store placement ENGAGE - Observations: Limited opportunities since engagement will likely be fast, proximity of bad/good choices sway decision making - Opportunities: EXIT - Observations: Length of lines, Time to complete transaction, what exits except cash-flash card and credit card - Opportunities: Reward with fast checkouts for healthy eating EXTEND - Observations: Eating on the go, Convenience of meals out of a bag, quick access and no mess - Opportunities: Carry friendly packaging for healthy options and more grab and go optionsHungry? | Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Schwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni Acayo November 17, 2011
  41. 41. Synthesis Unhealthy Food Options OBSERVATIONS OPPORTUNITIES 10 9 8 ENTER EXIT 7 6 5 PRIORITY LEVEL ENTICE EXTEND 4 3 ENGAGE 2 1 ENTICE - Observations: Site and Smell of Food, Unhealthy food as a reward and stress relief, Meal plan usage - Opportunities: ENTER - Observations: Staff Greeting, Site and Smell of Food, Food placement, Signage, Seating, Ambiance - Opportunities: Healthy food POP and signage, staff greetings that direct shopper to healthy food ENGAGE - Observations: Cost, Ladies shop longer than Men, Traffic flow/food placement, Aware that the choices are unhealthy - Opportunities: Food Placement, Education intercepts throughout store EXIT - Observations: Unhealthy rewards located at exit, food plan or credit card purchase creates a no commitment “swipe and go” - Opportunities: Calorie count at checkout EXTEND - Observations: Take out is an option, lots of food thrown away, dorm food is limited to cooking abilities, friends perceptions of food choices taking effect - Opportunities: More perishable food options that can be made with basic cooking, smaller portions at cafeterias, limit takeout on campusHungry? | Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Schwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni Acayo November 17, 2011
  42. 42. Synthesis OBSERVATIONS Socialization OPPORTUNITIES 10 9 8 ENTICE 7 6 ENGAGE EXTEND 5 PRIORITY LEVEL 4 3 2 ENTER 1 EXIT ENTICE - Observations: Friends suggestions/eating habits, crowded equals popularity, social events - Opportunities: ENTER - Observations: Initial decision making may be influenced by friends eating habits/perceptions of health, Staff greeting - Opportunities: ENGAGE - Observations: Influenced by word of mouth and suggestions, influenced by entertainment options in and near dining areas - Opportunities: Create more interest/entertainment in areas closer to healthy eating options EXIT - Observations: - Opportunities: Friends discussing their purchases, Students accountable in meal plan for how much junk vs. health food purchased EXTEND - Observations: 67% of people eat alone, people are eating and studying, eating in transit, groups are eating mostly the same items - Opportunities: Social integration into eating can create opportunities for healthy eaters to influence each otherHungry? | Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Schwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni Acayo November 17, 2011
  43. 43. Synthesis Where can Design Make a Difference? CONVENIENCE Design Interjections ENTICE 10 ENTER EXIT 9 8 7 Convenience 6 5 - Can we offer more healthy on the go snacks in transit locationsPRIORITY LEVEL ENGAGE 4 3 EXTEND (more food trucks?) 2 1 - Can we create quick checkout rewards for healthy shopping? UNHEALTHY FOOD OPTIONS Unhealthy Food Options 10 - How can signage, food placement, and point of purchase displays 9 8 ENTER EXIT cater more towards healthy food decisions? 7 6 - Can we create a calorie count at checkout to effect students future 5 engagement? PRIORITY LEVEL ENTICE EXTEND 4 3 2 ENGAGE Socialization 1 - Can social environments be created that are centered around healthy lifestyles and yet still be fun and entertaining? SOCIALIZATION 10 - Can more communal eating create a stronger network of healthy 9 students impacting unhealthy students? 8 ENTICE 7 6 ENGAGE EXTEND 5 PRIORITY LEVEL 4 3 2 ENTER 1 EXITHungry? | Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Schwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni Acayo November 17, 2011
  44. 44. 06 Evaluation: The Research Process and Its Effects on Our Information Problem
  45. 45. Evaluation Our Research Process Dissected Initial Research Revised Intercepts Evaluation Evaluation Was useful for creating the assumption map which helped This was a second try at documenting student eating habits and food frame the problem and visualize connections. A bit rushed, shopping environments. We took the knowledge gained from round one but gave us a good overview of the problem. Helped us to and tried to apply what we learned to get better results. For example, narrow our focus. we tried to use more story telling as a way of getting more in depth information with a more natural conversation flow. Literature Review Shadowing Evaluation Helped us to gain a better understanding of the topic in Evaluation relation to the target audience. Filled gaps. This was also a We shadowed four people while they shopped to observe how they made bit rushed, but we got the basic information we needed. their decisions on what to eat or not. The one person whom we were able to video tape spoke a lot and explained why he was doing what he Initial Observations/Photo Ethnography was doing. Next time though I think we should do more watching than talking because He kept stopping what he was doing to talk, which Evaluation disrupted the experience. Helped us gain deeper insights into students perceptions of healthy eating and how it connects to campus life. This Card Sorting process was crucial in understanding where to intercept people and what kinds of questions we should be asking. Evaluation This was meant to give us a greater incite into student’s motivations and priorities. Overall it went well, but it would have been nice to test more Random Public Intercepts people in more locations around campus. Evaluation The goal was to document student eating habits and food shopping environments. This first round was a lot of trial- and-error to figure out how to approach students and how to ask questions. The more people we spoke to, the better it went.Hungry? | Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Schwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni Acayo November 17, 2011
  46. 46. Evaluation 6.2 Next Steps Future Goals: - Broaden the scope of our research to include students who live off campus - Present research findings to administration to build a case for more healthy food options in better locations - Research and document how perceptions of health and wellness differ between males and females and different races. - Integrate physical activity and its positive factors into this researchHungry? | Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Schwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni Acayo November 17, 2011
  47. 47. 07 Bibliography: Sources used for Secondary Research
  48. 48. Bibliography Secondary Research Obesity Rates Hit Plateau in U.S http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/14/health/14obese.html Prevalence of Overweight, Obesity, and Extreme Obesity Among Adults: United States, Trends 1960–1962 Through 2007–2008 http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/c/centers_for_disease_control_and_prevention/index.html?inline=nyt-org Endocrine society / Obesity in America http://www.obesityinamerica.org/newsroom/Fasteating.cfm Center for disease and control: Obesity is a national epidemic, according to CDI “In 2009, about 2.4 million more adults were obese than in 2007. This epidemic has affected every part of the United States. In every state, more than 15% of adults are obese, and in nine states, over 30% of adults are obese.” The roles of energy intake and physical activity in the relationships among TV viewing, body composition, and obesity using high-quality measurement methods. http://www.nature.com/oby/journal/v19/n10/full/oby2011184a.html “These data suggest a strong relationship between TV viewing and BF%. This association appears to be due, in part, to differences in total PA, particularly vigorous PA, but not time spent in sedentary activity, moderate activity, or energy intake”. Racial and ethnic disparities in adult obesity http://www.cdc.gov/NCHS/data/hestat/obesity_adult_07_08/obesity_adult_07_08.pdf “Between 1988–1994 and 2007–2008, the prevalence of obesity among women increased (Figure 4): Whereas the prevelance of obesity among men did not increase within this time period” Household Routines and Obesity in US Preschool-Aged Children. http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/detail?vid=3&hid=122&sid=9449464a-0fa7-49c5-95a5-b400971ae535%40sessionmgr110&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d#db=hxh&AN=48682085 Citation (Anderson, S. E., & Whitaker, R. C. (2010). Household Routines and Obesity in US Preschool-Aged Children. Pediatrics, 125(3), 420-428. doi:10.1542/peds.2009-0417) The pressure to eat... “Culture has blamed obesity on the individual. We assume that people are overweight because of personal failings, that they’re lazy, weak, and gluttonous. An imperfect body reflects an imperfect person”. Citation (Liebman, B. (1998). The pressure to eat.. (cover story). Nutrition Action Health Letter, 25(6), 1. Retrieved from EBSCOhost.) Waist circumference and obesity-related abnormalities in French and Cameroonian adults: the role of urbanization and ethnicity. http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/imageQuickView?sid=99610e71-cc62-4f4b-a078-c18113a14d17@sessionmgr115&vid=6&ui=12582209&id=48564302&parentui=48564302&tag=AN&db=aph Sarcopenic Obesity: Does Muscle Loss Cause Fat Gain?: Lessons from Rheumatoid Arthritis and Osteoarthritis http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1749-6632.2000.tb06515.x/full   “Why  Have  Americans  Become  More  Obese?”   David  M.  Cutler,  Edward  L.  Glaeser  and  Jesse  M.  Shapiro     http://faculty.chicagobooth.edu/jesse.shapiro/research/obesity.pdf “Out  of  the  Kitchen,  Onto  the  Couch”   MICHAEL  POLLAN   http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/02/magazine/02cooking-t.html?pagewanted=allHungry? | Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Schwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni Acayo November 17, 2011
  49. 49. Bibliography Secondary Research “Obesity  Related  Statistics  in  America”   Get  America  Fit  Foundation   “The  Cost  of  Obesity  to  U.S.  Cities”   Dan  Witters,  Jim  Harter,  Katie  Bell,  and  Julie  Ray   http://gmj.gallup.com/content/145778/cost-obesity-cities.aspx QUOTE:  “When  rats  are  drinking  high-fructose  corn  syrup  at  levels  well  below  those  in  soda  pop,  they’re  becoming  obese  --  every  single  one,  across  the  board.  Even  when  rats  are  fed  a   high-fat  diet,  you  don’t  see  this;  they  don’t  all  gain  extra  weight.”     Hilary  Parker   http://www.princeton.edu/main/news/archive/S26/91/22K07/ QUOTE:  “57%  of  the  corn  we  produce  becomes  inexpensive  animal  feed  that  helps  keep  meat  prices  down.  But  it  also  makes  the  meat  fattier—and  consumers  fatter”   Eric  Roston   http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,994390,00.html#ixzz1dgiiwW00     QUOTE:  “healthy,  low-calorie  foods  cost  more  money  and  take  more  effort  to  prepare  than  processed,  high-calorie  foods.”   JoNel  Aleccia   http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/37280972/ns/health-diet_and_nutrition/t/pricey-grocery-stores-attract-skinniest-shoppers/#.TsEfGmAgxD5     QUOTE:   produces  healthy  people.”     http://www.thedailybeast.com/newsweek/2010/11/22/what-food-says-about-class-in-america.html QUOTE:  “the  grocery  store  is  set  up  in  a  way  to  get  you  to  purchase  what  they  want  you  to  place  in  your  cart.  Whether  you  want  to  or  not.  Some  of  these  items  can  be  healthy  but,   unfortunately,  most  are  not.”   QUOTE:  “The  cheapest  calories  come  from  fried  foods,  chips  and  sodas   Daniela  Hernandez,  Los  Angeles  Times   http://articles.latimes.com/2011/jul/17/health/la-he-food-deserts-20110712 QUOTE:  “While  we  know  visibility  is  critical,  too  often  stores  do  not  display  enough  better-for-you  foods.  My  own  store  surveys  have  illustrated  that  over  60  percent  of  stand-alone  displays   carry  items  that  nutritionists  would  decry  as  unhealthy How  Supermarkets  Could  Fight  Obesity   Hank  Cardello   QUOTE:  “Interaction  over  food  is  the  single  most  important  feature  of  socializing,”  says  Sidney  Mintz,  professor  of  anthropology  at  Johns  Hopkins  University.  “The  food  becomes  the     QUOTE:   health.”  Hungry? | Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Schwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni Acayo November 17, 2011
  50. 50. Bibliography Secondary Research QUOTE: LaVelle  of  the  University  of  Rhode  Island  in  Kingston,  “many  families  have  basically  stopped  eating  together.”  Solitary  eating  can  be  uncontrolled  eating--snacks,  sweets  and  meals  behind   the  wheel.  “By  age  10,  everyone  in  the  family  can  feed  themselves  whatever  they  want--and  they  do,”  says  LaVelle.     Jeffrey  Kluger;  Christine  Gorman;  Alice  Park   http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,994388,00.html#ixzz1bjNY0nAS QUOTE:  “In  the  United  States,  64.5  percent  of  adults  and  15  percent  of  children  ages  6  to  19  are  overweight.  Dieting  is  rampant,  but  most  who  lose  weight  gain  it  back.  Some  experts  blame   ever-increasing  portion  sizes  and  the  proliferation  of  tasty,  high-calorie  fast  foods  that  make  it  all  too  easy  to  eat  a  day’s  worth  of  calories  in  one  supersize  meal.”     Denise  Grady   http://www.nytimes.com/2002/11/26/science/why-we-eat-and-eat-and-eat.html?pagewanted=all&src=pm QUOTE:  “the  heavier  one’s  friends,  the  higher  one’s  own  chances  of  becoming  overweight...  how  is  that  transmitted  to  you?  By  sharing  behavior...  It’s  either  ‘Let’s  go  running’  or  ‘Let’s  share     QUOTE:  “The  sight,  smell,  and  talk  of  food  trigger  real  metabolic  signals  of  hunger   Rory  Evans   http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/36281026/ns/health-diet_and_nutrition/t/why-we-eat-when-were-not-hungry/#.TsEjfGAgxD5 World  Health  Organization   http://www.who.int/en/ QUOTE:  “Weight  gain  and  obesity  are  caused  by  consuming  more  calories  than  the  body  needs  –  most  commonly  by  eating  a  diet  high  in  fat  and  calories,  living  a  sedentary  lifestyle,  or   both.”     ObesityInAmerica.org   http://www.obesityinamerica.org/understandingObesity/index.cfm     QUOTE:  “In  a  study  involving  9,000  people  between  1982  and  1984  (NHANES  I),  researchers  found  that  people  who  averaged  six  hours  of  sleep  per  night  were  27  percent  more  likely  to  be     Julia  Layton   http://health.howstuffworks.com/mental-health/sleep/basics/sleep-obesity.htm “Causes  of  Obesity  in  America”   http://www.conquering-obesity.com/Causes-of-Obesity.html QUOTE:  “It  has  been  hypothesized  that  media  (tv  watching,  playing  computer  games,  etc)  displaces  physical  activity  and  that  food  advertisements  and  marketing  to  children  contribute  to   overweight  and  obesity”     Kathleen  Y.  Wolin,  Jennifer  M.  Petrelli QUOTE:   and  from  work...Do  we  work  out,  or  do  we  drive  the  kids  to  their  soccer  game,  where  we  can  sit  and  watch?  Do  we  work  out,  or  do  we  download  new  songs  from  iTunes?  ‘People  are  just   not  willing  to  give  up  their  leisure  time,’  Philipson  said.  ‘People  don’t  want  to  pay  to  exercise  with  their  leisure  time.’”  Hungry? | Adina Feigenbaum, Andy Schwanbeck, Diego Brito, Peni Acayo November 17, 2011

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