Lincoln-Cushing Camp No. 2, Sons of the Union Veterans of the Civil War
The News Walker
Vo l u m e 16, Nu m b e r 1 Sp r i...
The News Walker 	 Page 2
Camp Website: www.lincolncushing.org
December Camp Meeting Sets the Stage for 2014
Brother Richar...
The News Walker 	 	 							Page 3
Join SUVCW: http://suvcw.org/member.htm
Next Camp Meeting, 8 March, 11:30 am at Gadsby’s...
The News Walker 	 Page 4
Camp Website: www.lincolncushing.org
Commander’s Message: A New Birth of Freedom (Continued from ...
The News Walker 	 	 							Page 5
Join SUVCW: http://suvcw.org/member.htm
Friends of Ft.Ward Bus Tour on Saturday, 22 Marc...
The News Walker Page 6
Camp Website: www.lincolncushing.org
The Ontario Regiment in the Army of the Potomac,
as told by an...
A Union unit’s story, now told from all sides
Path of Blood: The True Story of the 33rd New York Volunteers
by George Cont...
The News Walker 	 Page 8
Camp Website: www.lincolncushing.org
Department Encampment:
25 April - 27 April in Lynchburg, Vir...
The News Walker 	 	 							Page 9
Join SUVCW: http://suvcw.org/member.htm
five missing in action; and at Sabine Crossroads...
RE S ER VAT I O N F ORM
Yes, I, __________________________will be attending the meeting
and am bringing __________________...
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Lincoln-Cushing Camp Newsletter Spring 2014, Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War

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Spring 2014 newsletter for Lincoln-Cushing Camp No. 2, Washington, DC, Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War (SUVCW).

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Lincoln-Cushing Camp Newsletter Spring 2014, Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War

  1. 1. Lincoln-Cushing Camp No. 2, Sons of the Union Veterans of the Civil War The News Walker Vo l u m e 16, Nu m b e r 1 Sp r i n g Ed i t i o n 2014 Inside This Issue C a l e n d a r f o r t h e Y e a r 2 0 1 4 8 March Lincoln-Cushing Camp Meeting 11:30 am Gadsby’s Tavern, Old Town,Alexandria 22 March FFW Defenses of Washington Tour TBD Various 25-26 April Department Encampment NA Lynchburg,VA 17 May Executive Meeting 10:00 am TBD 30 May Traditional Memorial Day Service 5:00 pm Arlington National Cemetery 30 May Lincoln-Cushing Camp Meeting 6:30 pm Ft. Myer Officers’Club, Arlington,VA 26 July Camp Picnic TBD TBD 14-17 August National Encampment NA Marietta, GA 30 August Executive Meeting 10:00 am Ft.Ward 13 September Lincoln-Cushing Camp Meeting 11:30 am Dubliner Restaurant, Capitol Hill, DC 22 November Executive Meeting 10:00 am Ft.Ward 6 December Lincoln-Cushing Camp Meeting 11:30 am Dubliner Restaurant, Capitol Hill, DC 2 December Camp Meeting Sets Stage for 2014 3 Next Camp Meeting 8 March, at Gadsby’s 5 Friends of Fort Ward Bus Tour 6 Book Reviews by Brother Bishop, through page 7 8 Note from Treasurer Lee Stone, PDC Please mark these dates on your calendar DATE EVENT TIME LOCATION A New Birth of Freedom “Our constitution does not copy the laws of neighbor- ing states; we are rather a pattern to others than imitators ourselves. Its administration favors the many instead of the few; this is why it is called a democracy. If we look to the laws, they afford equal justice to all in their private differ- ences; if no social standing, advancement in public life falls to reputation for capacity, class considerations not being allowed to interfere with merit…” “For this offering of their lives they received that renown which never grows old. For heroes have the whole earth for their tomb; and in lands far from their own, where the col- umn with its epitaph declares it, there is enshrined in every breast a record unwritten with no tablet to preserve it, except that of the heart.” - Pericles’ Funeral Oration from the Peloponnesian War “But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate -- we can not consecrate -- we can not hallow -- this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world … can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. …that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain -- that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom -- and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.” - Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address Recently, I’ve been thinking about three of my great-grandfathers (continued on Page 4) 39th Commander, Richard Griffin F r o m t h e C o m m an d e r Richard Griffin
  2. 2. The News Walker Page 2 Camp Website: www.lincolncushing.org December Camp Meeting Sets the Stage for 2014 Brother Richard Griffin Elected Commander Brother Brin Lewis is Senior Vice Commander Brothers gathered at the Dubliner Restaurant in Washington, DC to close out 2013 and conclude the year’s business. On the agenda was the welcoming of a new member and the election of new officers for 2014. Brother Richard L. King was obligated and joined the ranks of Lincoln- Cushing Camp with DSVC Robert Pollok on hand to administer the oath. Welcome Brother King, we hope to get to know you better at the upcoming 8 March meeting. Following the induction ceremony, Commander Ben Hawley honored brothers Richard Griffin, Brin Lewis and Lee Stone, PDC for their service during 2013 with a Certificate of Commendation. This was a much appreciated gesture. The final highlight of the meeting was the election of the 2014 team of officers who will strive to continue the great work done by Commander Hawley. Brother Richard Griffin was elected Commander for 2014 after spending a year as Senior Vice Commander under Commander Ben Hawley. We thank Ben for all he did for the camp in 2013 and now welcome him to the ranks of Camp Council. Brother Brin Lewis, former Junior Vice Commander, was elected to Senior Vice Commander, while Brother David Stringfellow took the reins of Junior Vice Commander. Brother Lee Stone, PDC was once again elected Secretary/Treasurer. In addition, Brother Donald Bishop was appoint- ed Patriotic Instructor and Brother John Higgins, Jr. was appointed Chaplain. Brother Richard King (left) takes the oath from DSVC Rob Pollock Brothers Brin  Lewis, Lee Stone (hidden), Richard Griffin, and Commander Ben Hawley 2014 officers sworn in (l to R) Brothers Don Bishop, David Stringfellow, Brin Lewis, John Higgins, Jr. (holding the Bible), Lee Stone, and Richard Griffin New Commander Richard Griffin and DSVC Rob Pollock Brother Lee Stone, PDC addresses the camp, sitting is Commander Ben Hawley
  3. 3. The News Walker Page 3 Join SUVCW: http://suvcw.org/member.htm Next Camp Meeting, 8 March, 11:30 am at Gadsby’s Tavern Our next camp meeting will take place at Gadsby’s Tavern on 8 March, 11:30 am. Gadsby’s Tavern is located at 138 North Royal Street, Old Town Alexandria. Our guest speaker will provide a unique and entertaining presentation as Brother Douglas Jimerson will focus on Abraham Lincoln and some of his favorite music in lecture and in song. Brother Jimerson began his professional performing career with The Washington Opera. He made his concert stage debut at Carnegie Hall in 1996. He has advanced degrees in opera and musicology. Brother Ji- merson and his period ensemble, the Civil War Comrades, regularly perform 18th and 19th century Ameri- can music for the National Park Service and national historic sites. Jimerson’s most recent CD release was entitled “Lincoln Portrait,” and he is currently writing a book about Lincoln’s favorite songs. This will certainly be a meeting to attend. We hope to see you all there. The reservation form for the meeting is on the last page of this newsletter. Commander Hawley, Thank you for your service to the Order! Outgoing Commander Ben Hawley and his beautiful wife Audrey 2014 Officers and Appointments | Lincoln-Cushing Camp Camp No. 2 Commander: Richard Griffin hoplite@earthlink.com Senior Vice Commander: Brin Lewis blewis@thrivevents.com Junior Vice Commander: David J. Stringfellow david.j.stringfellow@gmail.com Secretary and Treasurer: Lee Stone, PDC stoneld@aol.com Patriotic Instructor: Donald Bishop donbishop99@yahoo.com Camp Chaplain: John E. Higgins, Jr. higgins@cua.edu Members of the Camp Council: Calvin Zon, PCC Fr. Charles Nalls, PCC Charles “Ben” Hawley, PCC
  4. 4. The News Walker Page 4 Camp Website: www.lincolncushing.org Commander’s Message: A New Birth of Freedom (Continued from Page 1) who served in the Civil War. My ruminations have been in the context of the great struggle they were involved in, the sacrifices they endured, and our individual and collective responsibility, as members of the Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War, to preserve the memory of the “boys in blue” who fought, as President Lincoln said, to ensure a new birth of freedom and to preserve government of the people, by the people and for the people. This responsibility that we bear is of ancient lineage, harking back at least to the time of the Peloponnesian War (circa 431–404 BC), as the historian Thucydides reminds us, when the democracy Athens and the oligarchy Sparta were embroiled in a brutal war for mastery of Greece. I’ll come back to our responsibility later, but first I’d like to give a quick thumbnail description of my great-grand- sires’ service. John W. Griffin was born in Fredericton, New Brunswick, in 1837. I am not sure why, but he emigrated to Maine, apparently in 1853, when he was 16 years old. Of course, in those days, moving from New Brunswick to Maine was as simple as getting on board a schooner in Saint John and getting off in Eastport. John Griffin enlisted as a private in the Sixth Maine Volunteer Infantry on the 15th of July 1861, the same day the regiment completed mustering into federal service. During its service, the regiment participated in numerous battles, including Yorktown, Antie- tam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Rappahannock Station, The Wilderness, and Spotsylvania Courthouse. It mustered out in August 1864, having sustained losses of 77 killed, 243 wounded, 38 taken prisoner, and 30 missing in action. Of these, 22 killed, 73 wounded, 11 prisoners, and 5 missing were incurred at Fredericksburg; 40 killed and 97 wounded at Rappahannock Station; and 10 killed 37 wounded, 4 prisoners, and 30 missing at Spotsylvania Courthouse. John Griffin reenlisted as a Veteran Volunteer on the 23rd of December 1863, but transferred to the U.S Navy on the 10th of April 1864. This was after the Battle of Rappahannock Station, but before Spotsylvania Courthouse. He served on board several Navy ships, including the USS Fort Henry. I am not sure when he mus- tered out. Indications are that he may have served until 1868. He was a member of GAR Post 50 in Cherryfield, Maine. George Perkins was born in Ipswich, Massachusetts in 1841. He mustered into the Sixth New York Independent Battery as a private on the 7th of December 1861. He mustered out on 7 December 1864. During his service, the Sixth New York served, for the most part, as horse artillery with the cavalry corps of the Army of the Potomac. The battery participated in the Peninsula Campaign (when it was assigned as division artillery with Hooker’s Division), the Battle of Kelly’s Ford, the Chancellorsville Campaign, the Battle of Brandy Station, Gettysburg, Bristoe Sta- tion Campaign, Rappahannock Bridge, the Mine Run Campaign, the Battle of the Wilderness, Sheridan’s Raid on Richmond, the Battle of Hawe’s Shop, Early’s Raid on Washington, and the 1864 Shenandoah Campaign. Despite its intense involvement in the campaigns of the Army of the Potomac, the Sixth New York suffered only eight killed and nine who died of disease or accidents during the war. Perkins kept a diary during his three years in the army and wrote numerous letters to his hometown newspaper. He used the pen name “Hoplite”, the title of the citizen soldier of the ancient Greek city-states. Having been a student at Harvard College, I presume he was familiar with Thucydides’ account of the Peloponnesian War. Postwar, he was a member of Burbank Post of the GAR and was the first Commander and member of GAR Post 161 in Woburn, Massachusetts. Lyman D. Marsh was born in Gilford, New Hampshire in 1841. He mustered into the 8th New Hampshire Volun- teer Infantry on the 23rd of December 1861. The 8th New Hampshire served from March 1862 to July 1864 with the Army and Department of the Gulf, including the Red River campaigns under the command of the political general Nathaniel Banks. The regiment was converted into cavalry for a brief period in 1864. During the course of its service, the regiment lost 58 killed, 255 wounded, 78 prisoners, and 8 missing. It suffered its highest losses in the battles of Labadieville, Louisiana on October 27th 1862, where it lost 11 killed, 35 wounded, and one taken prisoner; Port Hudson Louisiana on May 27th 1863, where it lost eight killed and 87 wounded; Port Hudson again on June 14th 1863, where it lost twenty four killed, seventy six wounded, 13 taken prisoner, and (continued on page 9)
  5. 5. The News Walker Page 5 Join SUVCW: http://suvcw.org/member.htm Friends of Ft.Ward Bus Tour on Saturday, 22 March When the Northern Line Held: Defending Washington The Friends of Fort Ward are sponsoring a bus tour entitled “When the Northern Line Held: defending Washington in 1864.” It will be on Saturday, 22 March. Check-in will be at 8:30 AM, the bus will leave Fort Ward at 9:00 AM and will return at 5 PM. Dr. B. F. Cool- ing will lead the tour. He is the co-author, with Wally Owen, of Mr. Lincoln’s Forts: A Guide to the Civil War Defenses of Washington. The focus of the tour will be on the events of 1864 leading up to Confederate General Early’s July 11-12 attack on Fort Stephens, where President Lincoln came under fire.  The Registration fee is $85 for members of the FFW and $100 for non-members. The latter will receive a one-year membership in the FFW. The tour fee includes transportation, a boxed lunch, snacks, and site admissions. Registration deadline is March 20. Call Fort Ward a Museum at 703-746-4848 for more information and for registration forms.  2 5 - 2 6 April, Lynchburg, virginia • kirkley Hotel To receive our discounted group rate, make sure to mention you are with the SUVCW, Department of Chesapeake when making your reservation. Make plans now to attend the 2014 Department of Chesapeake Encampment on 25-26 April. Special room rates are available at the Kirkley Hotel and Conference Center 2900 Candlers Mountain Road, Lynchburg, Virginia, 24502 Contact the hotel at 1 (866) 510-6333 for special room rates. 2014Department of Chesapeake Encampment
  6. 6. The News Walker Page 6 Camp Website: www.lincolncushing.org The Ontario Regiment in the Army of the Potomac, as told by an embedded journalist The Story of the Thirty-Third N.Y.S. Vols: Or Two Years Campaigning in Virginia and Maryland by David W. Judd Rochester: Benton & Andrews, 1864 New York Times journalist David Wright Judd (1838- 1888) accompanied the 33rd New York Volunteer Infantry, the Ontario Regiment, during its two years in the Army of the Potomac from 1861 to 1863. They fought at Williamsburg, the Seven Days’ Battles, Antietam, and at the first and second battles of Fredericksburg. In that last fight, of 550 men who advanced, 221 were killed, wound- ed, or missing. This regimental history was published while the war was still ongoing, in 1864. As a journalist, Judd was not with the companies of the regiment in the thick of its engagements, but he was with them before and afterward, and he had good access to the headquarters tent. Here are things to like about this con- temporary account of the Civil War: • Judd had a fine nineteenth century way with words. The men of the regiment were “brave,” “gallant boys.” He was quite eloquent when discussing the Union cause and the sacrifice of the troops. • He was with the 33rd in camp, on marches, and as the soldiers cared for the wounded and buried their dead. There are many amusing stories of Civil War soldiering. • His description of the retreat of the Army of the Potomac from the outskirts of Richmond back down the Peninsula in June, 1862, is still fresh and frank. Twenty-first century infantry leaders could draw lessons from it. His description of Antietam the day after the battle is similarly graphic. You can learn a lot from Brady’s photographs, but Judd’s words are just as vivid. • The book contains unvarnished estimates of many generals, as seen from one regiment. McClellan was inspiring, Porter was a goat, Burnside was manly because he was honest. A century and a half later, all have been the subject of studies and evaluations. Reading contemporary views is refreshing. • Judd wrote the book about the leaders and soldiers of the regiment. He never drew attention to himself. The word “I” is almost entirely absent from the book. This lack of ego is refreshing. The volume includes maps and woodcut illustrations by an officer of the regiment. The work of veterans, biographers, and historians now tell us more about each of the 33rd’s engagements, but this account by an embedded journalist is valuable and entertaining precisely because he wrote the book so close in time to awful and momentous events. Tip: Make sure you purchase a facsimile reprint of Judd’s book, not a computer-generated copy that used optical scanning rather than reproduce the pages. Book Reviews by Brother Don Bishop
  7. 7. A Union unit’s story, now told from all sides Path of Blood: The True Story of the 33rd New York Volunteers by George Contant Seeco Printing Company, 1997 Path of Blood is a new history of a regiment in the Army of the Potomac, the 33rd New York Volunteer Infantry. The “Ontario Regiment” was raised in Western New York in the spring of 1861, and it served in Virginia and Mary- land -- fighting in the battles of Williamsburg, Antietam, and Fredericksburg -- during the first two years of the Civil War. The only previous book on the regiment, published in 1864, was written by the New York Times correspondent that accompanied the unit, David Judd. Though not a professional historian, George Contant masterfully located and combed through hundreds of scattered Civil War letters and fading newspaper articles to trace anew the story of the regiment. Contant’s new account has the same freshness as Judd’s because it so extensively quotes the contemporary let- ters of its officers and soldiers. It is even more satisfying because Contant also quotes the generals, men in neigh- boring units on the same battlefields, and the Confeder- ate soldiers who faced the 33rd. It is fresh, too, because Contant, in the tradition of great historians like Parkman, walked each of the battlefields. This freshness and familiarity overcomes the book’s minor editorial short- comings -- some typos and formatting lapses uncaught by the proofreader. Even after more than 130 years, there are new things to discover about the Civil War. At the Battle of Williams- burg on May 5, 1862, three companies of the 33d halted a Confederate advance led by Jubal Early with a desperate bayonet charge, preventing a major rout of the Union forces. Brigadier General Winfield Scott Hancock received the credit for the daring reversal -- jump starting his remarkable military and political career. Contant persua- sively shows, however, that it was the quick thinking of Lieutenant Colonel Joseph Corning of the 33rd that was decisive. Du Picq once said that study of a single skirmish in detail yields more knowledge of war than many books on campaigns. Path of Blood illustrates this well. There are many profound lessons about the Civil War -- and about war itself -- to be derived from the experience of the 33rd New York as it marched through Maryland and Virginia: fog of war, friction of war, principles of war, leadership, followership, cohesion and unit spirit, training, logistics, “cause and comrades,” and so on. Contant -- like myself, a descendant of one of the 33d’s soldiers -- deserves great credit for recovering them. Through the eyes of the 33rd’s soldiers we see McClellan and Sedgwick and Hancock -- the Peninsula, Antietam, and Fredericksburg -- at first hand. We hear the bands around the campfires and see the “burnished rows of steel” on the march. From their letters -- as they wrote them within hours and days of their struggles -- we hear their voices, cheers, and curses. We feel the battle rage. We learn of their exasperations, and their hopes. And in the end, we know too their love of country. Join SUVCW: http://suvcw.org/member.htm The News Walker Page 7 Book Reviews by Brother Don Bishop
  8. 8. The News Walker Page 8 Camp Website: www.lincolncushing.org Department Encampment: 25 April - 27 April in Lynchburg, Virginia This year’s Department Encampment will take place Friday 25 April through Sunday 27 April in Lynchburg, Virginia. Special guests will include C-n-C Ken Freshley and guest speaker Dr. Clifton Porter speaking on the topic of Union Prisoners of War in Lynchburg. Events will take place on Friday including a visit to the Appomattox Courthouse and other Lynchburg sites. From 6:00 pm-9:00 pm there will be a dinner at the Crown Sterling Steak House, 6120 Fort Avenue (dinner at your expense). The business meeting takes place on Saturday with the De- partment Council meeting at 7:00 am, morning session be- gins at 8:45 and the afternoon session begins at 1:30 pm. Group rates have been ar- ranged at the Kirkley Hotel and Conference Center, 2900 Candlers Mountain Road, Lynchburg, VA. Reservations can be made at our discounted rate of $86.99, plus tax, by calling 1 (866) 510-6333. Remember to mention De- partment of the Chesapeake to get the discount. All brothers and sisters are encouraged to attend. A note from Treasurer Lee Stone, PDC: Brothers who have not yet gotten around to renewing membership in Lincoln-Cushing Camp, SUVCW, may wish to consider what the Camp does with its portion of your dues money.  Each year the Camp supports projects that keep green in the minds of everyone--not just Brothers of the SUVCW--the deeds and sacrifices of the men who wore the Blue from 1861 to 1865 and saved our Union.  Recent examples are: contributing to the Civil War Trails sign about the 1863 death of General Michael Corcoran in Fairfax City VA; helping the 54th Massachusetts Infantry buy a new flag (the old one tattered beyond use by numerous campaigns); organizing and leading the public ceremony honoring all those who died for the Union, held by our Camp each year on 30 May (the true Memorial Day, handed down from the Grand Army of the Republic) at Arlington National Cemetery.  This year Arlington National Cemetery has asked to take part in our 30 May ceremony, in celebration of the 150th anniversary of the Cemetery. Of those who have renewed this year so far, the Camp wishes publicly to thank the following Brothers for donations above and beyond their dues: David A. Anderson, Donald E. Beck, Burrus M. Carnahan, Carroll J. Collins, John R. Crook, Shaun P. English, Peter H. Gregson, CC Richard N. Griffin, PCC Charles B. Hawley, Richard L. King, SVCC J. Brinley Lewis, David J. Lockwood, PCC Father Charles H. Nalls, Larry E. Ogden, James M. Perry, PCC Robert D. Pollock, PCC James R. Wachob, and PDC R. Keith Young.  In addition, the following old-style Life Members have voluntarily contributed to the Camp in lieu of dues: Melvin J. Bradley, PCinC Lowell V. Hammer, PDC Kenneth D. Hershberger, PCinC Andrew M. Johnson, Stephen H. Siemsen, and PDC Lee D. Stone.  The Camp is grateful to all those who have paid their dues for 2014, and hopes that every Brother who has not yet done so will see fit to renew.  Send your check for $40, made out to SUVCW, to Sec/Treas Lee Stone, 536 Wordsworth Cir, Purcellville VA 20132
  9. 9. The News Walker Page 9 Join SUVCW: http://suvcw.org/member.htm five missing in action; and at Sabine Crossroads Louisiana on the 8th of April 1864, where it lost three killed, 13 wounded, and 42 taken prisoner. Private Marsh was wounded in action on the 14th of June 1863 at Port Hudson and became a prisoner of war on the 8th of April 1864 at Sabine Crossroads. He returned to his regiment on the 30th of October 1864. He mustered out on the 18th of January 1865. So far, I have not been able to determine if he was a member of a GAR post. Back to that responsibility I referred to at the beginning of this essay. We do have the task of ensuring that the memory of the boys in blue does not fade away, but is kept alive for succeeding generations. In my view, we should do this by keeping the objects that they fought for and the heavy sacrifices that they endured central to their stories. In a personal way, I have tried to do this by recounting the service of three of my great-grandfathers. How will you help to perpetuate the memory of your ancestors? Commander’s Message: A New Birth of Freedom (Continued from Page 4) Attire: Business or SVR Uniform Cost for the meal is $29 per person. Checks should be made out to Lincoln-Cushing Camp 2 and sent to Secretary/Treasurer Lee Stone, PDC at the following address: Lee Stone, PDC 536 Wordsworth Circle Purcellville, VA 20132 Please mail your check in time to arrive by 1 March so that an accurate count can be given to the establishment. If you can’t get your check in by 1 March, please call Brother Lee at 540-338-5831 or 571-217-0160 and let him know that you plan to attend and bring your check with you. Please see the back page for the reservation form. Next Camp Meeting o f t h e L inc o ln - C us h ing C a m p N o . 2 Our next Lincoln-Cushing Camp meeting will be held at 11:30 am on 8 March at Gadsby’s Tavern, 138 North Royal Street, Old Town Alexandria, VA, phone (703) 548-1288. All members of the Camp, Auxiliary, and their guests are welcome. We hope to see you there! Our guest speaker will be Brother Douglas Jimerson who will provide a short lecture recital about Abraham Lincoln and some of his favorite music. Mr. Jimerson began his professional performing career with The Washington Opera. He made his concert stage debut at Carn- egie Hall in 1996. He has advanced degrees in opera and musicology. Douglas Jimerson and his period ensemble, the Civil War Comrades, regularly perform 18th and 19th century American music for the National Park Service and national historic sites.
  10. 10. RE S ER VAT I O N F ORM Yes, I, __________________________will be attending the meeting and am bringing __________________________ as my guest, and __________________________ as a potential candidate for membership. Enclosed is my check for $________ ($29.00/ per person). My entree choice: Monte Cristo Chicken Salad Cod Fish My guest’s choice: Monte Cristo Chicken Salad Cod Fish No, I, __________________________ regret that I will not be able to attend, however, enclosed is a donation to our Camp’s charitable works for $_______. Please detach and mail to: Mr. Lee D. Stone, PDC 536 Wordsworth Circle Purcellville, VA 20132 You do not need to buy a lunch to participate in the meeting. March Quarterly Camp Meeting Lincoln-Cushing Camp No. 2 Gadsby’s Tavern in Alexandria, Virginia Date: 8 March, 2014 Time: 11:30 am (Social Hour) Lunch: 12:30 pm Location: Gadsby’s Tavern 138 North Royal Street Old Town Alexandria, VA Lunch Selections: - Monte Cristo Sandwich - Chicken Salad - Ale-Battered Cod Fish Attire: Business or SVR Uniform Cost: $29 per person (Cash Bar) SONS OF UNION VETERANS OF THE CIVIL WAR Brin Lewis, Editor 3504 Wilson Street City of Fairfax, VA 22030-2936 Return Service Requested Lincoln-Cushing Camp No. 2 DEPARTMENT OF THE CHESAPEAKE STATEMENT OF PUBLICATION: THI S NEWSLETTER IS THE OFFICIAL HOUSE ORGAN OF THE LINCOLN-CUSHING CAMP NO. 2 , DEPARTMENT OF THE CHESAPEAKE, SONS OF UNION VETERANS OF THE CIVIL WAR. Published in the City of Washington, DC, United States of America. News Walker (c) 2014 to the Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War. All Rights Reserved. Brin Lewis, Editor. News Walker is distributed via Post and email to SUVCW members and friends. SUVCW, its officers or members accept no responsibility for the accuracy, completeness or quality of any material forwarded to and published in the News Walker or any referrals or links to the content. There is no intent to use any verifiable copyright protected material. We accept no responsibility for any loss or damage suffered by any person relying directly or indirectly on any information from the News Walker. You may not copy, reproduce, distribute, publish, enter into a database, display, perform, modify, create derivative works, transmit, or in any way exploit any part of The News Walker, except for your own personal use. R S V Pb y 1 March

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