Achieving and measuring success on the social web

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  • Achieving and measuring success on the social web

    1. 1. Achieving and measuring success on the social web
    2. 2. Session Summary- My experience- What is success on the social web?- Resources- How to measure success- ResourcesPresentation on Slideshare following thesession!
    3. 3. Over the past eighteen months we’ve beenaward winners and finalists 16x Our work has consistently been judged by 3rd parties to a) get results, b) be creatively different
    4. 4. Over the past twelve months, we’ve worked with:
    5. 5. What is success on the social web?
    6. 6. Understanding the social web Technology changes fast. People change slowly.
    7. 7. Let’s go right back to 28,000 BC to see the beginning of media technology. As you can see the pace oftechnology developing is increasing but our brains and the way that we respond to this technology has beenformed over tens of thousands of years!
    8. 8. Who said this?“This [new technology] will produce forgetfulness of those who learn to use it, because they will not practice their memory.... you offerthe appearance of wisdom, not true wisdom.”
    9. 9. Plato, and he wasreferring to the alphabet!This could be my parents complaining about Facebookor about the internet!But this was Plato complaining about the alphabet ashe thought that this would stop us from learning andremembering information and so he refused to writeanything down (he did eventually of course!)The same thing has happened again and again to allmedia technologies but we just do not realise it as weare too focused on the now
    10. 10. Who remembers not having or wanting to have amobile phone?
    11. 11. Telegraph allowed the first forms of ‘real-time’communication, our reaction?
    12. 12. Every time a new media emerges, the same issuearrises.. People apply the ways they work to the existing media to the new medium.
    13. 13. A new media emerges, thesame issue arrises..Alphabet? The first documents were written like youwould speak - because that is the technology that weunderstoodThe telephone? Alexander Graham Bell’s pitch was thatit was a broadcasting device because he was looking atmedia he understood - newspapersThe first movies were visual newspapers, the first TVshows were filmed..And the web? we took print and copied pasted it online!
    14. 14. The same thing ishappening today..People are applying the way they work withexisting media to social platformsTV advertisers and comms professionals often wantto develop BIG DISRUPTIVE CAMPAIGNS TO STOPPEOPLE AND GRAB THEIR ATTENTION. Interruptingpeople when they are in a social environment is notgoing to be a successful strategyThe social web is a new media, it’s not aboutdisrupting peopleIt’s about people and relationships
    15. 15. So how do relationshipsform?Between people and between people and brands? In thesame way, why?The way we deal with relationships between people inour brains has been developed over tens of thousands ofyears. Because brands developing relationships withpeople has not existed that long by comparison weprocess them in the same wayFrom our own experiences relationships tend to form inthe same way...
    16. 16. Meet through friends...
    17. 17. Find out you both like festivals...
    18. 18. and skiing...
    19. 19. eventually, you have such a good relationship, you’recomfortable taking stupid pictures together...
    20. 20. Relationships form slowly, this is the key tosuccess on the social web. Many lightweight interactions, over time.
    21. 21. Build relationships over time, then throw theparty!
    22. 22. How do we make manylightweight interactions?Be strategic and targetedIn our experience the following (highly complex!)model works:1. Identify2. Listen3. Develop mutually beneficial interactions (ifyou don’t know what they want at this stage -ask them)4. Listen5. Evolve campaign to enhance mutual benefits6. REPEAT!
    23. 23. The ultimate relationship?
    24. 24. Getty Images has an on-going advocacy Innocent recruited 26 parent bloggers, giving Kotex used Pinterest boards to send 50 programme drawing on different themes, called each a letter of the alphabet making them the influencers custom goodie bags - ‘Curve’ - http://curve.gettyimages.com/ ‘innocent kings and queens’ http://rab.bt/ http://bit.ly/GNmStz P0xUeISome examples of best practice advocacy programmes
    25. 25. P.S. There’s no such thingas a ‘Social Media Expert’At Rabbit we have a daily education program, it’scalled the Rabbitgram!Learn from the networks themselves:- Facebook Studio- About Foursquare- Twitter blog- Instagram Blog- Tumblr Staff- Soundcloud Community teamTop tier industry press:- The Next Web- Trend Watching- The Wall- Simply Zesty- PSFK- Social Media Examiner- Social Media Today- Social Times- Tech Crunch- Memeburn
    26. 26. How do we measure success?
    27. 27. The main frustrations withmeasuring social?Traditional model of a social campaign:- Designed to have a positive impact on brandsentiment- Designed to have a positive impact on brandaffinity- Designed to have a positive impact on word ofmouthThe issue here, is that it is hard to measure thisimpact on sales, there’s just so much data.The answer?
    28. 28. Define the role of social in your business and setclear objectives
    29. 29. Before you measuresuccess - define it!The key to measuring social media is to track the‘hard’ metrics, but also correlate performance withthe over-arching business objectivesIf the metrics you are looking at are not relevant tothese objectives, then you are not measuring theimpact of social but are rather quantifying activityHowever, social media is often perceived as an add-onthat the business can plug into instead of allowing allbusiness functions to capitalise on the possibilities
    30. 30. Stage one: volume &engagementBusiness objective: Increase web trafficSocial media KPIs:- Number of fans- Relevant followers/fan base- Clickthrough rates- Volume of traffic form social media channels- Drop-off rate from social traffic vs other trafficsources- Share of return visitors from social media vs othertraffic sources- Frequency of social media mentions- Share of voice
    31. 31. Stage two: brand health &customer experienceBusiness objective: Improve brand sentiment andservice levelsSocial media KPIs:- Sentiment variation over time- Sentiment variation by social media channel- Number of positive ratings or reviews- Number of brand advocates- Number of customer issues addressed on socialchannels- Number of customer issues resolved/resolution rate- Reduction in customer service calls
    32. 32. Stage three: Impact on thebottom lineBusiness objective: Improve lead generation andincrease salesSocial media KPIs:- Number of leads- Cost per lead and lead conversion rate (vs otherchannels)- Support cost (per customer in social channels)- Share of repeat customers (form social media vsother channels)- Transaction value per customer- Customer lifetime value
    33. 33. Do web analytics drive actionablerecommendations that make a difference?
    34. 34. The ToolsLithium, this is a premium sentiment analysisand listening tool that is in the same league asRadian6, Alterian, Meltwater Buzz and Sysomos We combine Lithium with a suite of lessexpensive or free monitoring tools whichchange on a weekly basis, here are twenty toget you going!
    35. 35. Free social mediamonitoring tools1 Alexa.comGives you stats on websites, including global rank,country rank, number of sites linking in, and goodbasic audience data including demographics2 AmplicateLike a lot of services, Amplicate operates afremium model. A quick search, which will give youa ‘hate’ vs ‘love’ snapshot for a brand is free. Pay$19 and you get a year’s worth of data and for$199 you can download various industry reports,the Amplicate blog comes highly recommended byour head planner Dirk!
    36. 36. Free social mediamonitoring tools3 Board ReaderBoard Reader will search for mentions across forums(including sites like Quora) and will also churn out achart based on mentions over time4 - Community ManagerHuman insight and analysis is essential!
    37. 37. Free social mediamonitoring tools5 Facebook InsightsThis should be standard for anyone who works insocial media. Free to access for any Page admin, thisprovides an in-depth picture of fans’ interactionswith your page6 Follower WonkFollower Wonk makes sense of yours, or someoneelse’s Twitter feed. You start with 150 credits, withevery search costing 30-40 credits (the idea beingthat after that you pay). Follower Wonk is useful ingiving you the equivalent of the Facebook ‘friends offriends’ metric, you can dissect a Twitter feed to seewhat type of users they reach in terms of followersand influence
    38. 38. Free social mediamonitoring tools7 FeedburnerA lot of blogs run their RSS feeds through the Google-owned Feedburner.  If they do, you can run themthrough Feed Compare to look at subscriber numbers– arguably a more useful metric than visitors as thismeasures engaged users who subscribe to a blog via afeed8 Google InsightsOne that is easily overlooked is Google’s Insights tool. This is not only useful in tracking brands, but alsosector specific areas and how they work acrossdifferent regionsFor example, Google News – cheese vs milk vs butterin the UK
    39. 39. Free social mediamonitoring tools9 How SociableThough as with many of these services, the idea isto get you to subscribe (starting at $19 a month), afree search will give you a range of influencemetrics across different social networks.   Useful ifyou track over time, or are doing a quickcompetitive search10 Ice rocket trendsIn addition to running a blog and news searchengine, Ice Rocket has a trends tool.   This allowsyou to compare a number of search terms, givingyou a basic graph of how they compare in share ofvoice.
    40. 40. Free social mediamonitoring tools11 KloutServices like Klout do have flaws (we’ve exploredthese more in our Rabbit Feed on influence), butboth Klout and Peerindex are useful for the abilityto create lists which can be public or private.  Essentially you can set up a league table of brandsacross a certain industry sector and track theirscores over time12 Mention MapA great visual tool, Mention Map tells you who anTwitter user speaks to the most.   Good for trackingthe influencers of influencers
    41. 41. Free social mediamonitoring tools13 Social MentionAn excellent free social search engine with basicanalytics including sentiment and top keywords.  Recommended.14 StatbrainVery often you will want to estimate the traffic ofa site where you’ve been featured. Statbrain willgive you an approximation of how many weeklyvisitors any site gets.
    42. 42. Free social mediamonitoring tools15 StatitgramWith Instagram breaking into the ranks of top tiersocial networks, there will be more of a need toanalyse Instagram activity. Statigram is a free servicewith a number of different elements. You can viewInstagram images via your browser, and set up acustom URL to direct people to (e.g.http://statigr.am/bmibaby).You can manage your followers, and you canalso get useful data about the type of engagementyour posts are getting, your most committed followersand the times of day to post16 TimelyWhen is the best time to tweet to hit the optimumnumber of followers?  Timely gives you the answer.  Amore sophisticated service also looking at Facebookand giving you data on influencers is Crowd Boosterhttp://crowdbooster.com/, which comes in at $20 amonth for 10 accounts.
    43. 43. Free social mediamonitoring tools17 Twitter CounterAnother free service with premium (paid for)features, this tracks your Twitter follower countover time.   To get data on retweets andmentions, prices start at $15 a month18 TweetreachAs the name says, Tweetreach will tell you howfar a tweet has gone in terms of reach (no ofpeople who in theory saw it) and who the mostinfluential tweeters of a certain term are.   Thefirst 50 results are free, making it useful to get areal-time snapshot of activity.   If you want amore in-depth report, that will cost you $20
    44. 44. Free social mediamonitoring tools19 TrendisticTrendistic tracks Twitter trends over time.   Inputa search term to see how it’s performed.   You canalso embed a code to have a chart changedynamically on your site20 Pin ReachOne of the first Pinterest analytics tools, analysespin reach and influence
    45. 45. ResourcesAs ever, new tools launch and existing tools developalmost every week.- The Rabbitgram- Web Metrics Guru- Social Media Examiner- Social Media Today- eConsultancy reports (membership or freesamples)
    46. 46. Any questions?brideyrae@therabbitagency.com @brideyrae 0208 123 9541

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