Iowa 2 historical

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Iowa 2 historical

  1. 1. humoranti-humor
  2. 2. Why did the chicken cross the road?Albert Einstein: Did the chicken really cross the road, ordid the road move beneath the chicken?Sir Isaac Newton: Chickens at rest tend to stay at rest.Chickens in motion tend to cross the road.A nun: It was a habit.Hamlet: That is not the question.John Donne: It crosseth for thee.Colonel Sanders: Did I miss one?
  3. 3. Why did the dinosaur cross the road? Why did the Texas chicken cross the road?Why did the chicken go to the seance?What is a chicken’s highest dream?
  4. 4. Laughter is one of the ways we cope withdiscrepancies in our lives. There is a dream we allhave for this world, and then there is, well, thisworld. There are expectations we have of ourreligions, and then there are our religions ...[O]urcapacity to love God, ourselves, people, and all oflife grows with our capacity to laugh....This ability to laugh in the midst of ourimperfections in the presence of God is what we callgrace. - Samir Selmanovic It’s Really All About God: How Islam, Atheism, and Judaism Made Me a Better Christian
  5. 5. Can you imagine Jesus, Moses, the Buddha, and Mohammed walking together ... not in a joke, but in reality: in friendship, in compassionate understanding, perhaps in honest but respectful difference ordisagreement, embodying toward one another the principles they taught?If they could cross the road together, might it be possible for us to follow them?
  6. 6. Why Christian identity? 1. I have 56 years of experience with it.2. It’s the religion claimed by 33% of the world’s people. 3. That 33% controls most of the world’s weapons and wealth. 4. Jesus said not to try to “fix” others first. 5. Members of other faiths are better suited to deal with their unique identity issues.
  7. 7. Can Christians today build a new kind of identity ... based on hospitality, not hostility, to the other? strong- benevolent
  8. 8. But how?
  9. 9. Four Challenges 2. Doctrinal 3. Liturgical 4. Missional
  10. 10. Four Challenges 1. Historical 2. Doctrinal 3. Liturgical 4. Missional
  11. 11. The historical challenge
  12. 12. Why don’t we all get along?
  13. 13. From Follow the Sacredness, by Jonathan Haidthttp://campaignstops.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/03/17/forget-the-money-follow-the-sacredness/Despite what you might have learned inEconomics 101, people aren’t alwaysselfish. In politics, they’re more oftengroupish. When people feel that a groupthey value — be it racial, religious, regionalor ideological — is under attack, they rallyto its defense, even at some cost tothemselves. We evolved to be tribal, andpolitics is a competition among coalitionsof tribes.
  14. 14. ... The key to understanding tribal behavior isnot money, it’s sacredness. The great trick thathumans developed at some point in the last fewhundred thousand years is the ability to circlearound a tree, rock, ancestor, flag, book or god,and then treat that thing as sacred. People whoworship the same idol can trust one another,work as a team and prevail over less cohesivegroups. So if you want to understand politics,and especially our divisive culture wars, youmust follow the sacredness.
  15. 15. Farther back, Rene Girard and others remind us, violence is at the root of all government and all religion.The Scapegoat Mechanism explains how we achieved political/religious unity and identity. We must face this truth in our history.
  16. 16. 1. Imitation2. Rivalry3.Violence and Anxiety4. Scapegoating & Sacrifice5. Religion, Prohibitions, Ritualization6. Priests and Prophets7. Jesus and the gospels8. The violent reversion of“historical/sacrificial Christianity
  17. 17. 1495 2nd Voyage Return Cargo: 1600 male and female Taino slaves for Spain “It is possible, with thename of the Holy Trinity, tosell all the slaves which itis possible to sell … Herethere are so many of theseslaves … although they areliving things they are asgood as gold.”
  18. 18. The Spaniards who remained inHispaniola were encouraged to takeTaino slaves “in the amount desired.”Columbus himself gave a teenage girlto one of his crew, Miguel Cuneo, forhis personal “use.” Cuneo wrote thatshe “resisted with all her strength”when he attempted to have sex withher, so he “thrashed her mercilesslyand raped her.” Being given a Tainowoman to rape was, in fact, a popular“company perk” for Columbus’s men.Columbus himself wrote to a friend,“There are plenty of dealers who goabout looking for girls; those fromnine to ten [years old] are now indemand.”
  19. 19. - An eyewitness in the early 1500’s As a result of the sufferings and hardlabor they endured, the Indians chooseand have chosen suicide. Occasionally ahundred have committed mass suicide.The women, exhausted by labor, haveshunned conception and childbirth….Many, when pregnant, have takensomething to abort and have aborted.Others after delivery have killed theirchildren with their own hands, so asnot to leave them in such oppressiveslavery.
  20. 20. Of the estimated 300,000 Taino alivewhen Columbus “discovered” them in 1492,about 12,000 remained in 1516, fewer than200 in 1546, and zero in 1555. What ourhistory calls “the discovery of America,”Taino history might call “the arrival ofthe Christian genociders,” if, that is,any Taino survived to tell an alternatehistory. None did.
  21. 21. “Here those Christiansperpetrated their first ravagesand oppression against thenative peoples. This was thefirst land in the New World tobe destroyed and depopulatedby the Christians.” --another eyewitness, Bartolome De Las Casas about Christian invasion of Hispaniola
  22. 22. The 16th-Century conquests of the ConquistadorsThe 4th-Century conquests of Constantine
  23. 23. From Eusebius: [Constantine] said that about noon, when the day wasalready beginning to decline, he saw with his own eyesthe trophy of a cross of light in the heavens, above thesun, and bearing the inscription, CONQUER BY THIS.At this sight he himself was struck with amazement,and his whole army also, which followed him on thisexpedition, and witnessed the miracle… [That night] inhis sleep the Christ of God appeared to him with thesame sign which he had seen in the heavens, andcommanded him to make a likeness of that sign whichhe had seen in the heavens, and to use it as a safeguardin all engagements with his enemies.
  24. 24. “In hoc signo vinces”IN THIS SIGN CONQUER?CONVERT BY THE SWORD?DOMINATE?COLONIZE?ASSIMILATE?INVADE AND OCCUPY?KILL?TERRORIZE?
  25. 25. From Eusebius:.At dawn of day he arose, and communicated the marvelto his friends: and then, calling together the workers ingold and precious stones, he sat in the midst of them,and described to them the figure of the sign he hadseen, bidding them represent it in gold and preciousstones. And this representation I myself have had anopportunity of seeing.
  26. 26. “Now it was made in thefollowing manner. A long spear,overlaid with gold, formed thefigure of the cross by means of atransverse bar laid over it. Onthe top of the whole was fixed awreath of gold and preciousstones; and within this, thesymbol of the Saviours name…”
  27. 27. A SPEAR? Really, Constantine? A spear?
  28. 28. This spear-cross was further adorned with an embroidered bannerthat featured the emperor and his family. The finished product,Eusebius said, “presented an indescribable degree of beauty tothe beholder.” He added, “The emperor constantly made use ofthis sign of salvation as a safeguard against every adverse andhostile power, and commanded that others similar to it should becarried at the head of all his armies.”Eusebius, it should be noted, would be considered more of apropagandist than a historian in the modern sense. For more onConstantine’s life and work, see James Carroll, Constantine’sSword: The Church and the Jews—A History (New York: MarinerBooks, 2001).
  29. 29. The violent cross of Caesar The nonviolent cross of ChristThe violent cross of ConstantineWhich Cross?
  30. 30. 1 Cor 1For the message about the cross isfoolishness to those who are perishing, butto us who are being saved it is the powerof God... we proclaim Christ crucified, astumbling-block to Jews and foolishness toGentiles, but to those who are the called,both Jews and Greeks, Christ the power ofGod and the wisdom of God. For God’sfoolishness is wiser than human wisdom,and God’s weakness is stronger thanhuman strength.
  31. 31. ... But God chose what is foolish inthe world to shame the wise; Godchose what is weak in the world toshame the strong; God chose whatis low and despised in the world,things that are not, to reduce tonothing things that are, so that noone might boast in the presence ofGod. (1 Cor.1)
  32. 32. the original Christian symbol
  33. 33. Serve like this ...Love like this ...Reconcile like this ...Transcend violence like this ...
  34. 34. Islamophobia Today:We should invade their countries, kill theirleaders, and convert them to Christianity. Weweren’t punctilious about locating and punishingonly Hitler and his top officers. We carpet-bombed German cities; we killed civilians.That’s war. And this is war.- Ann Counter, National ReviewIslam is something we can’t afford any more inthe Netherlands. I want the fascist Quranbanned. We need to stop the Islamisation of theNetherlands. That means no more mosques, no moreIslamic schools, no more imams.- Geert Wilders, Dutch politicians
  35. 35. These people [Arabs and Muslims] need to be forcibly converted to Christianity ... It’s the only thing that can probably turn them into human beings.- Michael Savage, syndicated radio hostIslam has attacked us ... The God of Islam isnot the same God.... Islam is a very evilreligion. All the values that we as a nationhold dear, they don’t share those same valuesat all, these countries that have themajority of Muslims.- Franklin Graham, Christian evangelist
  36. 36. Sound familiar?From Martin Luther, “On the Jews and TheirLies” (1543) They [rulers] must act like a good physician Text who, when gangrene has set in proceeds without mercy to cut, saw, and burn flesh, veins, bone, and marrow. Such a procedure must also be followed in this instance. Burn down their synagogues, forbid all that I enumerated earlier, force them to work, and deal harshly with them, as Moses did... If this does not help we must drive them out like mad dogs.
  37. 37. Elie Wiesel:“All the killers were Christian….TheNazi system was the consequence of amovement of ideas and followed a strictlogic; it did not arise in a void but had itsroots deep in a tradition that prophesiedit, prepared for it, and brought it tomaturity. That tradition was inseparablefrom the past of Christianized, civilizedEurope.”Quoted in David Stannard, American Holocaust: The Conquest of the New World(New York: Oxford, 1992), 153.
  38. 38. Indigenous scholar Jack Forbeswrites, “The ‘cosmology’ or‘world-view’ of a people isclosely related, of course, to all oftheir actions. The world-viewinfluences actions and, in turn,actions tell us what the world-view really is!”Jack Forbes, Columbus and Other Cannibals (New York: Seven Stories Press, 2008), 20.Originally published by D-Q University Press in 1979.
  39. 39. From this vantage point, Christianity has nothing –absolutely nothing – to teach Indigenous people about howto live in a good way on this land. In fact, Christians haveonly demonstrated that there is something profoundlywrong with the cosmology and worldview behind more thanfive centuries of carnage—carnage that has yet to even slowdown. Christians have so much negative history and dogmato overcome within their own tradition, I do not believe thereligion is even salvageable. The world is deep in thethroes of an ecological crisis based in Western economies ofhyper-exploitation. The planet will not survive another 500years of Christian domination.- Waziyatawin, PhD, 2012
  40. 40. From this vantage point, Christianity has nothing –absolutely nothing – to teach Indigenous people about howto live in a good way on this land. In fact, Christians haveonly demonstrated that there is something profoundlywrong with the cosmology and worldview behind more thanfive centuries of carnage—carnage that has yet to even slowdown. Christians have so much negative history and dogmato overcome within their own tradition, I do not believe thereligion is even salvageable. The world is deep in thethroes of an ecological crisis based in Western economies ofhyper-exploitation. The planet will not survive another 500years of Christian domination.- Waziyatawin, PhD, 2012
  41. 41. what do we do when we face our history?
  42. 42. deny it?
  43. 43. defend it?
  44. 44. create a new denomination/ religion?(disassociate from it?)
  45. 45. own it? be humbled by it? repent of it? learn from it? never forget it?be “reconverted” in light of it?
  46. 46. review our doctrine, practice, and mission in light of it?
  47. 47. listen to the voices of those who were previously marginalized?
  48. 48. Four Challenges 1. Historical 2. Doctrinal 3. Liturgical 4. Missional
  49. 49. AAre
  50. 50. you
  51. 51. ready
  52. 52. to
  53. 53. cross
  54. 54. the
  55. 55. road?

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