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GAME ON! PAGE 2015

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Brian Housand, Ph.D.
brianhosuand.com

Published in: Education
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GAME ON! PAGE 2015

  1. 1. GAME ON!INTEGRATING GAMES AND SIMULATIONS IN THE CLASSROOM SLIDES AND RESOURCES AVAILABLE AT brianhousand.com/page2015
  2. 2. Brian H E L L O My name is
  3. 3. I AM A GEEK
  4. 4. what is a game padlet.com/brianhousand/page15
  5. 5. OBJECTIVESRULES OBSTACLES
  6. 6. GAMES ARE VOLUNTARY GAMES OFFER CHOICES CHOICES HAVE CONSEQUENCES CONSEQUENCES OFFER FEEDBACK
  7. 7. FREEDOM TO EXPERIMENT FREEDOM TO FAIL FREEDOM TO TRY ON DIFFERENT IDENTITIES FREEDOM OF EFFORT -Scot Osterweil
  8. 8. Lev Vygotsky 17 November 1896 11 June 1934 Zone of proximal development social construcitivism play theory
  9. 9. In play, children are involved in an imaginary situation, with explicit roles and implicit rules. VYGOTSKY
  10. 10. This leads to a greater degree of self-regulation, the children's actions being determined by the rules of the game. VYGOTSKY
  11. 11. When involved in play, children's concentration and application to the task are much greater than in academically- directed activities contrived by the teacher. VYGOTSKY
  12. 12. Games are the most elevated form of investigation.
  13. 13. 10,000
  14. 14. STOP
  15. 15. ITECH
  16. 16. FORGETTHEi TECHNOLOGY!
  17. 17. ONLINE BOARD iOS
  18. 18. bit.ly/quest-to-learn
  19. 19. Collect Quest Puzzle Quest Share Quest Drama Quest Conquest Grow Quest Shrink Quest Maze Quest Story Quest Delivery Quest Seek and Destroy Quest Spy or Scout Quest Research Quest Design Quest Apprentice Quest Tracking Quest Experiment Quest
  20. 20. SPECIALIST Examine 5 games in one category JACK OF ALL TRADES Examine 3 games in each of the 3 categories GAME MASTER Dive in deep with ONE game TEACHER Teach someone else how to play a game
  21. 21. PLAY
  22. 22. HOURS 10,000
  23. 23. EXPERTS AT What? creativity communication collaboration problem solving Task commitment navigation
  24. 24. Jackson, L. A., Witt, E. A., Games, A. I., Fitzgerald, H. E., von Eye, A., & Zhao, Y. (2012). Information technology use and creativity: Findings from the Children and technology Project. Computers in Human Behavior, 28(2), 370-376. CREATIVITY COMPUTER USE INTERNET USE CELL PHONE USE VIDEO GAME PLAY
  25. 25. Jackson, L. A., Witt, E. A., Games, A. I., Fitzgerald, H. E., von Eye, A., & Zhao, Y. (2012). Information technology use and creativity: Findings from the Children and technology Project. Computers in Human Behavior, 28(2), 370-376. CREATIVITY VIDEO GAME PLAY
  26. 26. REAL GAMES VS. EDUCATIONAL GAMES
  27. 27. “While most games contain a clear reward system for players (moving up a level, receiving badges or points, etc.), what may be most appealing to educators is that games provide students A SAFE PLACE TO LEARN FROM FAILURE. In games, exploration is inherent and there are generally no high-stakes consequences. Children are able to EXPERIMENT AND TAKE RISKS TO FIND SOLUTIONS without the feeling that they are doing something wrong. GAMES ENCOURAGE STUDENTS TO MAKE AND LEARN FROM MISTAKES, which is a particularly important concept in the K-12 setting.” GAME BASED LEARNING
  28. 28. GAMIFICATION: The use of game elements and game-design techniques in non-game contexts.
  29. 29. POINTS BADGES LEADER BOARDS
  30. 30. POINTS Effectively Keep Score Determine WIN State Connection Between Progress and Reward Provide Feedback External Display of Progress Data for Game Designer
  31. 31. BADGES Goals to Strive Toward Guidance About Possibilities Visual Markers of Accomplishment Status Symbols Tribal Markers
  32. 32. LEADER BOARDS
  33. 33. ENGAGE
  34. 34. GAMIFICATION OFFERS CHOICE
  35. 35. It’s about THE EXPERIENCE.
  36. 36. Play
  37. 37. Magical and Meaningful
  38. 38. Story
  39. 39. DEFINE LEARNING OBJECTIVES
  40. 40. 2. Delineate Target BehaviorsDELINEATE TARGET BEHAVIORS
  41. 41. DESCRIBE YOUR PLAYERS
  42. 42. DEVISE ACTIVITY CYCLES
  43. 43. DON’T FORGET THE FUN!
  44. 44. DEPLOY APPROPRIATE TOOLS
  45. 45. BOSS LEVEL
  46. 46. CONSUMERS PRODUCERS
  47. 47. TYPE III INDEPENDENT OR SMALL GROUP INVESTIGATIONS PRODUCTS AND/OR PERFORMANCES TYPE I GENERAL EXPLORATORY ACTIVITIES TYPE II METHODOLOGICAL TRAINING / HOW-TO ACTIVITIES (Renzulli, 1977)
  48. 48. I used to think… But now, I think…
  49. 49. YOU
  50. 50. FIND YOUR PEEPS
  51. 51. Dear Future Self, SHORT MEDIUM LONG
  52. 52. brianhousand.com brianhousand@gmail.com @brianhousand brian.housand bc1000

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