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Rescue the rescuer first - v.15

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When did it fall out of fashion to talk about protecting the lives and safety of water and wastewater workers, as if it were a top priority in the design and operation of public water systems? There was a time, at least, when the American public marveled at the advancements in water-related sanitation because they still remembered how awful things were beforehand.

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Rescue the rescuer first - v.15

  1. 1. RESCUE THE RESCUER FIRST Brian Gongol DJ Gongol & Associates, Inc. September 22, 2021 Iowa WEA Annual Conference Altoona, Iowa
  2. 2. Should we treat operators like customers?
  3. 3. Should we treat operators like customers? The question isn't nearly as stupid as it may sound
  4. 4. After all, most operators are customers
  5. 5. But this is more of a business question
  6. 6. Specifically: When did it fall out of fashion to talk about protecting the lives and safety of water and wastewater workers, as if it were a top priority in the design and operation of public water and wastewater systems?
  7. 7. Don't forget your history There was a time when the American public marveled at the advancements in water-related sanitation because they still remembered how awful things were beforehand
  8. 8. Look at that lovely ornamentation
  9. 9. It's more than symbolic Even though much of the work related to that progress was far more dangerous than it is today, there was a sense that the people working in the sector were public heroes
  10. 10. Fort Dodge Messenger, 1905
  11. 11. That's five straight columns of water news
  12. 12. Today's standards  Should be: "How safe can we make this for operators?"  Too often are: "How cheaply can we get this done while meeting the minimum standards from OSHA?"
  13. 13. Hard truth Things would look different if we authentically saw water-sector operators as community heroes -- and treated them as well on the job as they treat their customers
  14. 14. How do we get to that state of mind?
  15. 15. Humanizing the value of quality spaces
  16. 16. Find the root cause
  17. 17. First-class spaces
  18. 18. Second-class spaces
  19. 19. Third-class spaces
  20. 20. This is not about resenting the rich
  21. 21. This is not about resenting the rich But it is about the consequences of "out of sight, out of mind"
  22. 22. Surfside condominium collapse
  23. 23. Surfside condominium collapse Everything looked good in the 1st class spaces (pool and lobby)
  24. 24. Surfside condominium collapse Everything looked good in the 1st class spaces (pool and lobby) People looked past the 2nd class spaces (parking garage)
  25. 25. Surfside condominium collapse Everything looked good in the 1st class spaces (pool and lobby) People looked past the 2nd class spaces (parking garage) 3rd class spaces were clearly ignored (pool mechanical equipment rooms)
  26. 26. The collapse killed 98 people ⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰ ⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰ ⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰ ⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰ ⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰ ⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰ ⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰ ⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰ ⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰ ⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰⚰
  27. 27. We are shaped by our built environments
  28. 28. Spaces, classified (not classified spaces) (Of course, those matter, too)
  29. 29. 1st Class: Meant to be seen
  30. 30. 2nd Class: Not embarrassing, not noteworthy
  31. 31. Let's linger on 2nd Class, though
  32. 32. 3rd Class: Meant to be unseen
  33. 33. Comparative costs per square foot to build
  34. 34. Comparative costs per square foot to build  Class A office space: $150 to $200/sf (and up)  Residential: $150/sf (and up)  Prefab: $125/sf  Morton building: $75 to $125/sf  Wooden barn: $30 to $45/sf
  35. 35. Cost comparisons It's not about the absolute cost you choose, it's about the difference between that and the least you could get away with -- the marginal cost.
  36. 36. Justifying the marginal difference
  37. 37. Justifying the marginal difference  Quantify the cost of neglect  Note savings from better spaces (fewer service calls, savings from performing work onsite, insurance)  Recognize the implicit risk -- operators die in bad spaces every year, mostly for no good reason  Show the benefits
  38. 38. But spaces aren't the only factor that matters
  39. 39. QUERY: Who here is a volunteer firefighter?
  40. 40. Rescue the rescuer first Don't drown a lifeguard to save a swimmer
  41. 41. Broken-down fire equipment? Unthinkable.
  42. 42. Broken-down fire equipment? Unthinkable. This is maintenance and upkeep you perform right in front of everybody
  43. 43. Fair equivalence WTPs, WWTPs, pump stations, and other facilities have to be at least at the fire department level of cleanliness, comfort, and utility
  44. 44. Water workers are front-line "rescuers"
  45. 45. Water workers are front-line "rescuers" Want to put hospitals into an instant crisis? Shut down drinking water and wastewater treatment.
  46. 46. That starts with safety
  47. 47. Can you guess the top OSHA citations?
  48. 48. #1 - Fall protection
  49. 49. #2 - Hazard communication
  50. 50. #3 - Respiratory protection
  51. 51. #4 - Construction scaffolding
  52. 52. #5 - Ladders
  53. 53. #6 - Control of hazardous energy
  54. 54. #7 - Powered industrial trucks
  55. 55. #8 - Fall protection training
  56. 56. #9 - Eye and face protection
  57. 57. #10 - Machinery guarding
  58. 58. Guess the top causes of workplace fatalities  For FY2019, per OSHA  Not including workplace violence or traffic fatalities  Put these in order:  Fires/explosions  Chemical exposure  Falls  Contact with objects
  59. 59. #1: Fall, slip, or trip (880) ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑
  60. 60. Fall on same level (146) ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑
  61. 61. Fall to lower level (711) ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑
  62. 62. Fall through surface or opening (95) ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑
  63. 63. #2: Contact with objects and equipment (732) ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑
  64. 64. Struck by object or equipment (518) ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑
  65. 65. Struck by falling objects (241) ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑
  66. 66. Struck by discharged or flying object (26) ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑
  67. 67. Caught/compressed by objects (120) ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑
  68. 68. Caught in running equipment (93) ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑
  69. 69. Harmful substances or environments (642) ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑
  70. 70. Exposure to electricity (166) ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑
  71. 71. Exposure to temperature extremes (53) ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑
  72. 72. Exposure to other harmful substances (379) ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑
  73. 73. Inhalation of harmful substance (59) ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑
  74. 74. Fire or explosion (99) ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑ ⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑⛑
  75. 75. Lots of emphasis on fires We go to all kinds of trouble to control fires (XP motors, combustible gas detection, no smoking), and it works
  76. 76. But fires aren't the only problem We need to put the same kind of muscle into eliminating the other causes of workplace death
  77. 77. When was your last close call? Years? Months? Weeks? Days?
  78. 78. Test your situation Could you safely walk a competent temp through your job over a Zoom or FaceTime call?
  79. 79. Spaces reflect choices
  80. 80. Better spaces matter
  81. 81. Policies, procedures, & paper reveal priorities
  82. 82. Thank you! Brian Gongol DJ Gongol & Associates 515-223-4144 brian@gongol.net @djgongol on Facebook/LinkedIn/Twitter
  83. 83. Sources  Surfside condominium collapse: https://www.washingtonpost.com/investigations/interactive/2021/pool-deck-condo-collapse/  OSHA citations: https://www.osha.gov/data/commonstats https://www.osha.gov/top10citedstandards  OSHA fatalities: https://www.bls.gov/news.release/cfoi.t02.htm  Construction prices:  Commercial: https://proest.com/construction/cost-estimates/office-buildings/  Residential: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/home-finances/21722334/cost-to-build-a-house  Morton building: https://mortonbuildings.com/blog/what-does-a-morton-buildings-home-cost  Barns: https://www.buildingsguide.com/faq/how-much-does-storage-horse-barn-cost/

When did it fall out of fashion to talk about protecting the lives and safety of water and wastewater workers, as if it were a top priority in the design and operation of public water systems? There was a time, at least, when the American public marveled at the advancements in water-related sanitation because they still remembered how awful things were beforehand.

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