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Lift station buyer's guide - v.07

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A review of the big-picture items one should consider when designing, selecting, or purchasing a lift station. All eight major types of lift stations are considered.

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Lift station buyer's guide - v.07

  1. 1. Lift Station Buyer's Guide Brian Gongol DJ Gongol & Associates, Inc. March 13, 2018 Nebraska Rural Water Association Annual Conference Kearney, Nebraska
  2. 2. Who needs a "Lift Station Buyer's Guide"?
  3. 3. Smart buying matters
  4. 4. "An educated consumer is our best customer"
  5. 5. A lift station is a major investment
  6. 6. You are like a bank trustee
  7. 7. Lift station selection in seven steps
  8. 8. 1. Determine the confguration
  9. 9. Eight ways to lay out a lift station
  10. 10. Depends on site conditions
  11. 11. Above-ground suction lift
  12. 12. Vertical turbine
  13. 13. Recessed suction lift
  14. 14. Buried suction lift
  15. 15. Dry-pit submersible
  16. 16. Shafted dry pit
  17. 17. Wet-pit submersible with valve vault
  18. 18. Wet-pit submersible with valves above ground
  19. 19. No single answer is always right
  20. 20. No answer should be prematurely dismissed
  21. 21. 2. Apply the right pumps to the application
  22. 22. Current conditions
  23. 23. Current conditions
  24. 24. Future conditions
  25. 25. Future conditions
  26. 26. Flexibility to upgrade
  27. 27. Flexibility to upgrade
  28. 28. Solids passage
  29. 29. Solids passage
  30. 30. Solids capture
  31. 31. Solids capture
  32. 32. Solids reduction
  33. 33. Solids reduction
  34. 34. Scouring velocity
  35. 35. Scouring velocity
  36. 36. Parallel operation
  37. 37. Parallel operation
  38. 38. Series operation
  39. 39. Series operation
  40. 40. 3. Consider backup power options
  41. 41. Redundant grid
  42. 42. Redundant grid
  43. 43. Generator (fxed/portable)
  44. 44. Generator (fxed/portable)
  45. 45. Engine backup
  46. 46. Engine backup
  47. 47. Portable pump
  48. 48. Portable pump
  49. 49. Permanent pump
  50. 50. Permanent pump
  51. 51. 4. Determine the enclosure type
  52. 52. Size to ft the maintenance and operation
  53. 53. Size to ft the maintenance and operation
  54. 54. Site-built or prefabricated
  55. 55. Site-built or prefabricated
  56. 56. Suitability to neighborhood
  57. 57. Suitability to neighborhood
  58. 58. Security
  59. 59. Security
  60. 60. Sound
  61. 61. Sound
  62. 62. Safety
  63. 63. Safety
  64. 64. Sightliness
  65. 65. Sightliness
  66. 66. 5. Select the controls style and confguration
  67. 67. Level controls
  68. 68. Level controls
  69. 69. Control logic (solid-state, PLC)
  70. 70. Control logic (solid-state, PLC)
  71. 71. Feedback and SCADA
  72. 72. Feedback and SCADA
  73. 73. Redundancy
  74. 74. Redundancy
  75. 75. Power loss
  76. 76. Power loss
  77. 77. Lightning and surge protection
  78. 78. Lightning and surge protection
  79. 79. On-site alarms
  80. 80. On-site alarms
  81. 81. Of-site alarms
  82. 82. Of-site alarms
  83. 83. 6. Account for total life-cycle costs
  84. 84. Spare parts
  85. 85. Spare parts
  86. 86. Maintenance costs
  87. 87. Maintenance costs
  88. 88. Hardened/extended-life wearing parts
  89. 89. Hardened/extended-life wearing parts
  90. 90. Packaged stations versus piecemeal approach
  91. 91. Packaged stations versus piecemeal approach
  92. 92. Packaged by pump factory
  93. 93. Packaged by pump factory
  94. 94. Packaged by a third party or site-built
  95. 95. Packaged by a third-party shop
  96. 96. 7. Address all safety issues
  97. 97. Explosive gases
  98. 98. Explosive gases
  99. 99. Toxic gases
  100. 100. Toxic gases
  101. 101. Fall risk
  102. 102. Fall risk
  103. 103. Drowning risk
  104. 104. Drowning risk
  105. 105. Flooding risk
  106. 106. Flooding risk
  107. 107. Electrocution hazards
  108. 108. Electrocution hazards
  109. 109. Moving parts
  110. 110. Moving parts
  111. 111. Prohibiting unauthorized access
  112. 112. Prohibiting unauthorized access
  113. 113. To recap  There are eight diferent ways to do a lift station  No one way is a silver bullet  Each has its place  Apply the pumps for sensible possibilities  Account for backup power  Enclose wisely  Control thoughtfully  Plan for maintenance  Always be safe
  114. 114. Questions? If you don't want to ask now, send me an email! brian@gongol.net
  115. 115. Thank you!  Brian Gongol DJ Gongol & Associates  515-223-4144  brian@gongol.net  @djgongol on Twitter  facebook.com/djgongol  www.gongol.net
  116. 116. Credits  Uncle Sam poster:  http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/96507165/  In the public domain  Horseless carriage ad:  Fort Dodge Semi-Weekly Chronicle; May 30, 1899  Presumed in the public domain since it is a work well beyond copyright age  Pump graphs courtesy of the Gorman-Rupp Company  All other photographs, illustrations, and other content are the original work of the author and are not to be used without prior permission; copyright is reserved

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