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Lift station backup options

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Any pumping system that is critical to the operation of public works infrastructure requires some kind of backup system in case power is lost. There are several options, each with unique considerations.

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Lift station backup options

  1. 1. BACKUP POWER FOR EMERGENCY PUMPING Brian Gongol DJ Gongol & Associates, Inc. June 8, 2017 Iowa WEA Annual Conference Ottumwa, Iowa
  2. 2. Here comes the rain again
  3. 3. If you have to pump, you need backup power
  4. 4. Causes of power outages
  5. 5. Ice storms
  6. 6. System overloads
  7. 7. Routine accidents
  8. 8. Thunderstorms
  9. 9. What happens in a thunderstorm?
  10. 10. I&I (or high combined flows)
  11. 11. You need power most when it's easiest to lose
  12. 12. Six power options
  13. 13. 1. Redundant grid access
  14. 14. 2. Fixed electric generators
  15. 15. 3. Portable electric generators
  16. 16. 4. Fixed engines
  17. 17. 5. PTO
  18. 18. 6. Portable pumps
  19. 19. Storage also matters
  20. 20. Does storage give you time to act?
  21. 21. We'll come back to storage later
  22. 22. Option #1: Redundant grid access
  23. 23. Ten States permits "independent substations"
  24. 24. Power systems very expensive to install
  25. 25. Independent grids, but common threats
  26. 26. Ice storms
  27. 27. High winds and hail
  28. 28. High temperatures
  29. 29. All tend to hit a broad geography
  30. 30. Of no help at all in case of mechanical failure
  31. 31. Requires switching equipment
  32. 32. Option #2: Fixed generators
  33. 33. Common practice to mount at station sites
  34. 34. May be interior or exterior to station
  35. 35. Requires transfer switching
  36. 36. Expensive to install
  37. 37. Not usually integrated with the pump station Affects cost to install and integrate Affects maintenance friendliness (especially if outdoors)
  38. 38. Security, vandalism, & aesthetic considerations
  39. 39. Sizing risk: You don't want it too small
  40. 40. Sizing risk: You don't want to pay for too much
  41. 41. Often requires a large footprint
  42. 42. Roughly doubles this station footprint
  43. 43. Requires fuel storage or supply
  44. 44. May require spill containment
  45. 45. Requires regular exercise and maintenance
  46. 46. Operates non-stop on power failure Creates non-stop noise Consumes fuel Can create heat and other byproducts
  47. 47. Option #3: Portable generators/gen sets
  48. 48. Problem: Travel can be difficult when needed
  49. 49. Sacrificing manpower at critical times
  50. 50. Can consume a lot of fuel
  51. 51. May require lots of shuttling or babysitting
  52. 52. May be useful for other applications
  53. 53. Can be very loud
  54. 54. May be time-consuming to activate
  55. 55. Requires routine exercise and maintenance
  56. 56. Requires parts, training, and service
  57. 57. Requires storage
  58. 58. Transportation considerations How big? How heavy? How towable? What kind of skid/wheel kit/trailer?
  59. 59. Fuel may go bad
  60. 60. Not helpful in a lightning strike
  61. 61. Operates continuously even when pumps don't Not an "efficient" approach in the strict sense of the word
  62. 62. Option #4: Fixed engines
  63. 63. Double-shafted motor with a clutch
  64. 64. Fixed-engine backup configuration
  65. 65. Fixed-engine backup configuration
  66. 66. Fixed-engine backup configuration
  67. 67. Fixed-engine backup configuration
  68. 68. Fixed-engine backup configuration
  69. 69. Fixed-engine backup configuration
  70. 70. Fully integrated unit - no transfer switch
  71. 71. Can use natural gas, LP, or other fuels
  72. 72. Highly compact, fully secure footprint
  73. 73. All O&M conducted indoors; no outdoor work
  74. 74. Buildings can reduce noise
  75. 75. Can be made "neighborhood-friendly"
  76. 76. Single-engine or multiple-engine configs
  77. 77. Little or no field wiring required
  78. 78. Usually employs dual AC/DC controls
  79. 79. Battery on trickle charger supplies controls
  80. 80. Engine shuts down when not in use
  81. 81. Tamper-proof and vandalism-resistant
  82. 82. Should be factory-designed and tested
  83. 83. Only option that can be fully factory-tested
  84. 84. Option #5: PTO
  85. 85. Useful in select applications
  86. 86. Handy if tractors are in widespread use
  87. 87. May work mainly with lineshaft pumps
  88. 88. Option #6: Portable pumps
  89. 89. Simple version: Drop hoses in a hole
  90. 90. Better version: Built-in bypass connections
  91. 91. Most complex: Self-contained portable station
  92. 92. Consider noise abatement
  93. 93. Consider fuel storage
  94. 94. Consider fuel choice, too (gas vs diesel)
  95. 95. The pump will need storage, too
  96. 96. Some require babysitting
  97. 97. Some supplied with full control packages
  98. 98. Best if station accommodates quick activation
  99. 99. Least amount of total equipment required
  100. 100. Requires operator time and effort to start REMEMBER: By the time you get the call, you're probably already in an alarm condition -- and that's before travel time
  101. 101. May have multipurpose use
  102. 102. May be only option for a flooded station
  103. 103. Portable station, semi-permanent placement
  104. 104. Consider transportation issues  Carry in back of a truck?  Lift by hand?  Skid-mounted?  Trailer-mounted?  Highway trailer?
  105. 105. Consider cold-weather operation  Do you want to work on this in the cold?  Will a diesel engine work?  Can you get to every site in a snowstorm?
  106. 106. Reliability is critical: Plan around "PEAT" Pump Engine Accessories Transportation
  107. 107. Storage capacity also matters!
  108. 108. A common mistake: Under-sizing the wetwell
  109. 109. Wetwell capacity isn't linear with diameter
  110. 110. 5' of storage in 6' diameter: 1,055 gallons
  111. 111. 5' of storage in 8' diameter: 1,880 gallons
  112. 112. 5' of storage in 10' diameter: 2,937 gallons
  113. 113. A larger wetwell rarely changes O&M costs
  114. 114. But what about the wetwell going septic?
  115. 115. Anti-septic solution #1: Mixers
  116. 116. Anti-septic solution #2: Cyclical aeration
  117. 117. Anti-septic solution #3: Pumping cycles
  118. 118. Anti-septic solution #4: Chemicals/microbes
  119. 119. Overflow basins/storage
  120. 120. Be aware of what's stored in gravity sewers
  121. 121. Hundreds of gallons can be hidden
  122. 122. May cause extraordinary pumpdown times
  123. 123. Also note what's stored in the force main
  124. 124. Not useful for emergency operations
  125. 125. But important to total system operation
  126. 126. To recap  Consider all six options:  Redundant grid access  Fixed electric generators  Portable electric generators  Fixed engines  PTO  Portable pumps  Up-front cost doesn't tell the full story -- at all  Each option has its place
  127. 127. Sources  Radar map of March 6, 2017 severe weather from NOAA  Map of derecho event in 2014 from NOAA:  http://www.spc.noaa.gov/misc/AbtDerechos/casepa ges/jun302014page.htm#  All other photos and illustrations are the original work of the author, the author's company, or Gorman-Rupp  All rights reserved; reproduction prohibited without written consent
  128. 128. Thanks for your attention Contact us anytime with questions Brian Gongol - DJ Gongol & Associates 515-223-4144 brian@gongol.net

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