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Doing More With Less

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How to apply lessons from manufacturing to other sectors (like engineering and public works) to deliver efficiency

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Doing More With Less

  1. 1. DOING MORE WITH LESS Brian Gongol DJ Gongol & Associates, Inc. March 14, 2017 Nebraska Rural Water Conference Kearney, Nebraska
  2. 2. Utilities are generally in the public sector
  3. 3. But they can learn from the private sector
  4. 4. One lesson is how to do more with less
  5. 5. Many companies are bloated and bureaucratic
  6. 6. But some are models of efficiency
  7. 7. Prominently, both Honda and Toyota
  8. 8. Good historical reasons to work efficiently
  9. 9. Toyota couldn't pay for materials in advance
  10. 10. Just-in-time was necessary, not optional
  11. 11. Japanese gov't worked actively against Honda
  12. 12. Cost advantages - the only way to compete
  13. 13. To do more with less, think efficiency
  14. 14. If "cheaper" is the goal, you're bound to fail
  15. 15. This is the part a lot of people get wrong
  16. 16. The priority has to be waste reduction
  17. 17. Toyota calls these "wastes" muda, muri, mura
  18. 18. You're not going to call them that
  19. 19. Your enemies make your operation "WIDE"
  20. 20. 1. Wasted effort
  21. 21. 2. Inconsistency
  22. 22. 3. Downtime
  23. 23. 4. Errors
  24. 24. 1. Eliminate Wasted Effort Don't do work that doesn't need to be done
  25. 25. Simple Taylorism has been around a long time
  26. 26. Count motions, eliminate repetition
  27. 27. Documentation is a place to start
  28. 28. At least be conscious of effort involved
  29. 29. Don't define "efficiency" too narrowly
  30. 30. Document for known reasons
  31. 31. Don't let documentation become a monster
  32. 32. Koch's "Charts for Charles" debacle
  33. 33. Eliminate trivial or unimportant work
  34. 34. Replace it with useful, purposeful work
  35. 35. Less time on nonsense
  36. 36. More time on investments in future value
  37. 37. What has future value?
  38. 38. Preventive maintenance
  39. 39. Training and study
  40. 40. This extends to decision-making, too
  41. 41. The brain is energy-hungry
  42. 42. Don't waste energy on dumb decisions
  43. 43. Create templates and checklists
  44. 44. Think efficiently about thinking
  45. 45. High mental-energy tasks vs. low
  46. 46. Schedule mental tasks around mental energy
  47. 47. Small-scale outsourcing: Remote assistants
  48. 48. 2. Eliminate Inconsistency Find the right way, then follow it consistently
  49. 49. Document how you do them
  50. 50. Find ways to do them better
  51. 51. Experiment with new approaches
  52. 52. Don't be afraid of experiments
  53. 53. Experiments are the foundation of evolution
  54. 54. Stick with small, low-risk experiments
  55. 55. Good experiments start on the front lines
  56. 56. Upgrade when necessary, then standardize
  57. 57. Industry standards can be a resource
  58. 58. But don't let "standards" become an anchor
  59. 59. Procedures should be living documents
  60. 60. People are hesitant to document
  61. 61. It shouldn't be intimidating
  62. 62. Record the steps
  63. 63. Record your decision-making trees
  64. 64. Think like you're programming a computer
  65. 65. Great way to start: Take and print pictures
  66. 66. Documentation: Do it for institutional memory
  67. 67. Very important in the current retirement wave
  68. 68. Always consider ease of maintenance
  69. 69. If you maintain it, you get to know it
  70. 70. Maintenance familiarity leads to operational expertise
  71. 71. People feel helpless with their cars today
  72. 72. Few people do their own car maintenance
  73. 73. But have you seen a hacker kid at work?
  74. 74. Familiarity comes with tearing stuff apart
  75. 75. Maintenance is a skill-development practice Active engagement with equipment leads to consistency
  76. 76. Cross-training can have a huge impact
  77. 77. Fresh eyes on old problems
  78. 78. Learning by teaching
  79. 79. 3. Eliminate Downtime "Be always ashamed to catch thyself idle." - Benjamin Franklin
  80. 80. Pace your work - always be doing something
  81. 81. Move the football down the field
  82. 82. Nobody likes scrambling when they fall behind
  83. 83. It's still OK to take breaks during the day
  84. 84. It means you even out the load...
  85. 85. ...so you can look forward to an even pace of work
  86. 86. Smooth out your workloads
  87. 87. Avoid frenzied periods and rushed work
  88. 88. Get a real grip on what you do and don't control
  89. 89. If something isn't within your control...
  90. 90. Plan ahead to do less of other things that are
  91. 91. If it is within your control...
  92. 92. Take a step back and put it in order
  93. 93. Create an equalization basin for your work
  94. 94. "But I do better when there's a deadline!"
  95. 95. Rush periods result in sloppy work
  96. 96. Downtime means you're not really useful (not justifying your paycheck)
  97. 97. Get rid of workplace downtime Get your downtime at home or on vacation
  98. 98. Smooth out workloads to do the work better
  99. 99. Smoothing work also means you always look busy
  100. 100. Self-worth is enhanced by doing meaningful work "Human dignity and self respect are undermined when men and women are condemned to idleness." - Margaret Thatcher
  101. 101. Fulfilling, paced work makes people happy And happy people make measurably better decisions
  102. 102. People who look busy have an easier time getting help "Help a man to help himself, but do not expend all your efforts in helping a man who will not help himself." - Theodore Roosevelt
  103. 103. 4. Eliminate Errors "Well done, is twice done." - Benjamin Franklin
  104. 104. Get rid of errors
  105. 105. Track performance, then check results
  106. 106. Create templates within office software
  107. 107. Use conditional formatting to highlight aberrations
  108. 108. Once you find a problem, trace the cause
  109. 109. If you don't know why you're making a mistake, you're going to repeat it
  110. 110. Ask why. Then ask why again. Then ask why again. Then ask why again. Then ask why again.
  111. 111. The "Five Whys" go to the root cause of a problem
  112. 112. Deliberately eliminate those root errors
  113. 113. Take tips from industries with very big risks  Aviation  Military  Nuclear power
  114. 114. Use humane names, not codes
  115. 115. Don't stop until you've traced original causes Do you have eye injuries because your people are careless, or because they're self-conscious about wearing eye protection?
  116. 116. See why cost savings can't be the top priority?
  117. 117. Eliminating root errors may cost money up-front
  118. 118. Savings may only add up over the long term
  119. 119. But utility customers are around for the long term, too
  120. 120. Don't let go until you know the root cause of the error
  121. 121. To recap
  122. 122. Eliminate WIDE Wasted effort Inconsistency Downtime Errors
  123. 123. What did we never ask? "How much will this cost?"
  124. 124. If you only cut costs, this process won't work
  125. 125. Costs cannot be the focus
  126. 126. This is a process for getting things done better
  127. 127. You have to trust the process
  128. 128. Better work will result in savings But that can't be the objective!
  129. 129. The objective must be to cut waste
  130. 130. As you eliminate waste... You will get more done with less
  131. 131. Questions?  Thank you for your attention Brian Gongol DJ Gongol & Associates 515-223-4144 www.djgongol.com info@djgongol.com @djgongol on Twitter facebook.com/djgongol
  132. 132. References  All photographs, images, and illustrations are the original work of Brian Gongol. Copyright and all other rights reserved.  The books shown in the preceding slides served as highly valuable resources in the preparation of this presentation and they are all recommended reading.

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