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Aeration 101

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Aeration in wastewater treatment

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Aeration 101

  1. 1. BLOWING AWAY YOUR BUGS Brian Gongol DJ Gongol & Associates, Inc. April 12, 2016 Iowa AWWA Short Course Ankeny, Iowa
  2. 2. Aeration
  3. 3. Part 1: Purposes
  4. 4. Biological treatment
  5. 5. Temperature mixing
  6. 6. Seasonal inversion
  7. 7. Odor control
  8. 8. Mixing effects
  9. 9. Solids settling
  10. 10. Ice prevention
  11. 11. Part 2: History
  12. 12. Early human history: Stale or stagnant water
  13. 13. Biological treatment emerged in late 1800s
  14. 14. 1882: Original study of aerating sewage
  15. 15. Trickling filters, septic tanks prevalent
  16. 16. 1893: First studies suggesting activated sludge
  17. 17. 1914: Activated sludge first defined
  18. 18. 1913-1915: First patents granted (US and UK)
  19. 19. 1915-1916: First full-scale US activated sludge plants
  20. 20. 1920s: The rise of lawsuits
  21. 21. 1936-1943: Tapered, step, and modified aeration
  22. 22. 1972: Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments
  23. 23. 1977: Clean Water Act
  24. 24. Part 3: Mechanical aeration
  25. 25. Cascades (waterfalls)
  26. 26. Trickling filter
  27. 27. Fountain aerator
  28. 28. Splasher - high-speed
  29. 29. Splasher - low-speed
  30. 30. RBC
  31. 31. Solar-powered mixers
  32. 32. Part 4: Forced air - coarse bubbles
  33. 33. Perforated hose and static tube
  34. 34. Wideband
  35. 35. Duckbill check valve diffusers
  36. 36. Coarse discs
  37. 37. Coarse bubble caps
  38. 38. Jet
  39. 39. Part 5: Forced air fine bubbles
  40. 40. Ceramic discs
  41. 41. Membrane discs
  42. 42. Membrane tubes
  43. 43. Floating aspiration
  44. 44. Submerged aspiration
  45. 45. Unconventional membranes
  46. 46. Micro and nano-bubbles
  47. 47. Part 6: Oxygen transfer
  48. 48. Pure oxygen versus air
  49. 49. OTE
  50. 50. Bubble size
  51. 51. Distance traveled
  52. 52. Part 7: Accessories and considerations
  53. 53. Grit and solids settling
  54. 54. Baffles to extend treatment
  55. 55. Solids uptake into wideband diffusers
  56. 56. Cleaning
  57. 57. Fouling
  58. 58. Creep
  59. 59. Heat
  60. 60. Minerals
  61. 61. Materials of construction
  62. 62. Non-sticking surfaces
  63. 63. Power failure
  64. 64. Integral check valves
  65. 65. Part 8: Locations
  66. 66. Pump station wetwells
  67. 67. Storage/equalization basins
  68. 68. Pretreatment
  69. 69. Biological treatment
  70. 70. Clarification/dissolved-air floatation
  71. 71. Polishing
  72. 72. Aerobic sludge digestion
  73. 73. To recap  Aeration serves a variety of purposes  The obvious ones have been known for quite some time  The biological treatment uses are only about a century old  Mechanical aeration faces serious limitations  Coarse bubbles can get some work done  Broad agreement surrounds the advantages of small bubbles
  74. 74. Questions?  Thank you for coming!
  75. 75. Thank you for your attention!  Contact us anytime with questions  Brian Gongol  DJ Gongol & Associates  515-223-4144  info@djgongol.com
  76. 76. References  Valuable historical details obtained from "Reflections on Seven Decades of AS History" by James E. Alleman and TBS Prakasam, Journal of the Water Pollution Control Federation (1985)  Supplemental historical details from "History of Activated Sludge", Conference of the International Water Association (2014)  Some illustrations courtesy of the respective manufacturers (RWL Water and SSI Aeration)  All other photos are original work by and copyright reserved to Brian Gongol

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