Successfully reported this slideshow.
4/26/13 Less twang, more tech: Why luring techies means changing the citys image - Nashville Business Journalwww.bizjourna...
4/26/13 Less twang, more tech: Why luring techies means changing the citys image - Nashville Business Journalwww.bizjourna...
4/26/13 Less twang, more tech: Why luring techies means changing the citys image - Nashville Business Journalwww.bizjourna...
4/26/13 Less twang, more tech: Why luring techies means changing the citys image - Nashville Business Journalwww.bizjourna...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Less+twang,+more+tech +why+luring+techies+means+changing+the+city's+image+ +nashville+business+journal

157 views

Published on

  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Less+twang,+more+tech +why+luring+techies+means+changing+the+city's+image+ +nashville+business+journal

  1. 1. 4/26/13 Less twang, more tech: Why luring techies means changing the citys image - Nashville Business Journalwww.bizjournals.com/nashville/print-edition/2013/04/26/less-twang-more-tech-why-luring.html?s=print 1/4From the Nashville Business Journal:http://www.bizjournals.com/nashville/print­edition/2013/04/26/less­twang­more­tech­why­luring.htmlSUBSCRIBER CONTENT: Apr 26, 2013, 5:00am CDTLess twang, more tech: Why luring techiesmeans changing the citys imageJamie McGeeStaff Writer­ Nashville Business JournalEmail  | Twitter  | Google+Nashville’s biggest brand and key moneymaker — country music — is getting in the way of itsdrive for tech talent.City and business leaders want to build Nashville’s fledgling technology industry, which meanscompeting nationally for software developers, systems analysts, programmers, engineers andtech entrepreneurs that are in high demand in nearly every industry. But first, Nashville has toconvince that tech savvy workforce that there’s more to Music City than country music.“This sounds petty, but I don’t like country music,” said tech entrepreneur Mike Fruzzetti, whomoved to Austin, Texas, after selling his first venture in Boston. Nashville wasn’t on his radar.“It’s definitely known for music, specifically country music, and Music Row and all the recordlabels,” Fruzzetti said. “People automatically just assume it’s just a music city.”Nashville’s country music brand is an asset in many ways, but it also is undercutting efforts todraw tech talent who want progressive, diverse locations with thriving technology communities.Concerns about Tennessee politics and a lack of diversity also surface as the city seeks to addtech employees.A demand for tech skills is not unique to Nashville. In fact, a shortage of tech skills is a nationalproblem, with demand still fierce in cities with the largest tech communities.But software developers and coders are flocking to areas that are more established as tech hubs,including Silicon Valley; San Francisco; New York; Austin; Boston; Seattle; Portland, Ore.; andBoulder, Colo. Beyond the need for a more developed startup and tech community that caneventually help attract more startup and tech talent, what keeps people from choosing
  2. 2. 4/26/13 Less twang, more tech: Why luring techies means changing the citys image - Nashville Business Journalwww.bizjournals.com/nashville/print-edition/2013/04/26/less-twang-more-tech-why-luring.html?s=print 2/4Nashville?First impressions“When people think of Nashville, they think of the Grand Ole Opry and country singers,” saidRichard Bass, president and founder of the Boulder and Denver Software Club in Colorado.“Tech is not the first thing that comes to mind.”There’s no question that country music is in many ways Nashville’s bread and butter. And itsfirst impression.When someone lands at Nashville’s airport, the first thing they hear is a recording of a Nashvillecountry artist welcoming them to Nashville as they pass by a Tootsie’s Orchid Lounge outpostand a gift shop overflowing with guitar and boot­shaped memorabilia.The music industry and its associated branding is a big draw not just for tourists but for newresidents. And Nashville’s music scene has broadened its influence beyond country, with recentrock transplants such as The Black Keys, Kings of Leon and Jack White.Nashville doesn’t need to replace its image of cowboy boots and country music, it needs to addto it, said entrepreneur and startup investor Mark Montgomery, who sold his online musicmarketing company Echomusic to Ticketmaster in 2007 and has since founded Flo{thinkery}, acompany that helps businesses develop strategy.“We need to give a complete picture,” he said. Country music “is a foundation we can grow on.We do ourselves a disservice by not expanding the message.”That message goes beyond growing the tech talent pool, but also impacts companies’ decisionson where to locate, said Angelos Angelou, an Austin­based site selector for tech companies.“When it comes to music — the commercialization of music — Nashville is No. 1,” he said.“When it comes to a very strong place of health care industries, Nashville looks very, very good.When it comes to technology, that’s where Nashville may have a little bit of everything but notenough to have a hugely identifiable cluster in technology.”Angelou, however, also emphasized that a lively nightlife and music scene are important whenyoung people, tech included, choose a city, something Nashville does have in its favor.In some ways, Nashville’s music industry helps attract other industries. Hattery, a startup lab inSan Francisco and New York, is considering Nashville for a third location. Hattery strategist MikeMcGeary pointed to the already established creative community as a strength.“We have an interest in creative communities and Nashville always has marketed itself in thatway with the country music industry and others,” he said. “There are a lot of incentives to be ina place like this.”The “hump” of NashvilleSpreading the word about Nashville’s growing tech scene is a critical step in building the
  3. 3. 4/26/13 Less twang, more tech: Why luring techies means changing the citys image - Nashville Business Journalwww.bizjournals.com/nashville/print-edition/2013/04/26/less-twang-more-tech-why-luring.html?s=print 3/4industry, city leaders say. It was a key factor in the Nashville Area Chamber ofCommerce’s WorkIT Nashville campaign that launched in February to help fill the more than800 open technology jobs in Middle Tennessee.Janet Miller, the chamber’s chief economic development officer, said the effort is aimed athelping employers emphasize the strengths of Middle Tennessee, as well as address objectionsabout Nashville that limit recruitment efforts.Perception issues extend beyond country music. Miller said executives often field questions andconcerns about the area, such as diversity, whether or not it’s “an all­white South” and thepossibility of urban living.To many, Nashville is associated with headlines borne in the state Legislature — such as recentbills that would limit classroom discussion about homosexuality (known as the don’t­say­gaybill) or tie welfare payments to the academic performance of children — which can becomedefining images over time and can be problematic in attracting entrepreneurs and softwaredevelopers who typically seek inclusive and diverse communities, said Michael Burcham, CEO ofNashville’s Entrepreneur Center.“Every time the state Legislature does anything that looks sort of anti­inclusive, which they dopretty frequently, those things get such national press that we are viewed as ultra­conservative,”he said. “It always has an impact so you have to scream louder about the vibrancy of startups,the all­inclusiveness of our startups, that we like weird people just like Austin does.”And whether or not the Legislature passes any of those proposals is almost irrelevant, Burchamsaid. “That just drowns out all the other good noise we are trying to make,” he said.When software developers living outside of Nashville were asked about what drew them to theircurrent cities, beyond the opportunities to work in established tech hubs and proximity tobeaches or mountains, they also mentioned a city’s overall attitude.“Seattle’s progressive politics are also appealing,” said software engineer Curt Clifton, who livesin Seattle. “It’s hard for me to imagine a thriving tech community in an area that rejects gayrights or denies the reality of climate change. Both positions are out of step with the young,scientifically trained professionals that drive the tech industry.”Clifton said he isn’t familiar with Nashville’s political climate, but his position illustrates prioritiesfor many young people in the tech field.Steve Berneman, co­founder and CEO of OverDog, moved to Nashville from Austin to launch hiscompany. He’s since found in his own hiring of developers that perceptions of Nashville areusually remedied when candidates do their research on the city’s offerings and discover itsrankings as a best city in national magazines. (Nashville ranked as No. 10 on Forbes’s Best Citiesfor Tech Jobs in 2012.)OverDog, a mobile app connecting pro athletes with fans through video games, recently hired asoftware developer from Washington and just recruited a sales vice president from Los Angeles.
  4. 4. 4/26/13 Less twang, more tech: Why luring techies means changing the citys image - Nashville Business Journalwww.bizjournals.com/nashville/print-edition/2013/04/26/less-twang-more-tech-why-luring.html?s=print 4/4“You have to get people over the initial hump of Nashville,” Berneman said. “If they don’t knowabout Nashville, they think they are going to the ‘don’t­say­gay’ state. They don’t think about itas a progressive city.”Speaking the languageWhen Andy Matthews, a Web developer at Emma, spoke to a group of about 600 developers ata conference in San Francisco last year, he showed a slide at the end of his presentation withpictures of The Black Keys on the cover of the Nashville Scene, a snapshot of Nashville successstories including Rivals.com, StudioNow and Echomusic, and a list of startups drawing nationalattention, including Artist Growth, Sorted Noise and Everly.“I love Nashville,” said Matthews, who moved to Nashville in 1998. “I feel like Nashville gets abad rap as the home of country music. … The honky­tonks are great. It’s an awesome feature,and it really jazzes up the Nashville downtown. [But] there is more than that.”Montgomery points to Matthews’ presentation as one example of how Nashville can add to itsbrand, where traditional media or messaging is far less effective among coders and developers.“Understand who your target audience is, go where they are, speak to them in a way thatresonates with them and do it over and over,” he said.That Nashville is an emerging technology and entrepreneurial city is starting to resonate. Butbuilding that message, as well as the actual community and the necessary infrastructure, takestime, Burcham said.“The more people learn about the city and the good things that are here, they will probablywant to be here,” he said. “We are in early, early evolutionary stages of getting the word outabout the city. It’s … going to take a lot of time and some successful startups. … In three to fiveyears it will slowly, slowly get out there.”For leading developers in Nashville, getting the word out about Nashville is done by building onits existing community and strengths: hosting events such as CoderFaire and HackNashville,further developing its user groups, speaking and attending conferences and developing newleaders within the existing user groups, said software developer, consultant and entrepreneurJacques Woodcock.The business community can help build Nashville’s status in the tech world by supporting thoseefforts, he said. That means companies allowing or even paying for tech employees to attendthese events, sponsoring user group meetings and sponsoring events that further put Nashvilleon the map.“It exposes the developer to different ways of thinking, which is fantastic,” Woodcock said. “Ifwe can send our developers out to the world, other developers will see that Nashville has greatdevelopers … and they will see there is a strong community” here.Jamie McGee covers tourism, entertainment and technology.

×