http://sfe.io/r74 @sparkfun #nsta14
Using graphing / data visualization as a
Playground for Literacy and Mathematics
Scratch-ing the Surface of
Programming and Enhancing Science
Using graphing as a
Playground for Literacy and
Mathematics
Brian Huang, Linz Craig, Derek Runberg
learn.sparkfun.com
brian.huang@sparkfun.com
@bri_huang @sparkfun
Pause…
Before we move any further, let’s make sure that
we all know each other in this room?
Please introduce yourself to ...
Schedule
• Introduction to Scratch, History
• A few basic functions
• Draw and graph
• PicoBoard
• Adding more functions
About Us
At SparkFun, our focus is all about creation,
innovation, and sharing information.
Open Source Hardware is at the...
“ Teacher s t hat make…
Make gr eat t eacher s”
-Anonymous
Scratch?
• MIT Media Lab / Life-long
Kindergarten Lab
• Out growth of Seymour Papert
A few things..
• Free, http://scratch.mit.edu
– Download version 1.4
• Open source
• Create games, animations, & interacti...
Elements  Vocabulary
• Sprite / Costume
• Stage / Background
• Script / Blocks
The stage is a background
or a “back-drop” for your
project..
You can paint, import, or
take a photo as your
background.
M...
Grid space for the stage is
setup with a standard
Cartesian coordinate
system.
The origin - (0,0) is in the
center.
Extent...
Attributes of the sprite and the stage can be
manipulated using a script or set of
instructions.
A script consists of a se...
1. Modify your Sprite /
Costume and the Stage /
Background.
2. Use any of the 8 blocks (or
copies of the blocks) to
introd...
General Usage Tips
A basic function
Cloning..
Creating a sprite
The paint tools in Scratch are standard
Pretty neat, eh?
Hat Blocks
Hat blocks all start with the
key word “when”
Hat blocks define the
beginning of a script.
Any blocks attached ...
So, why Scratch?
What else can it do?
• Presentations
• Animations / Simulations
And...
GRAPHING!
Paint a simple sprite –
just for data
Initialize the position of the
sprite
Recall: Grid space is
X: -240 to +240,
Y: -180 to +180
Introduce a loop or “forever”
Blocks can be placed
inside the “forever”
bracket.
Any and all code blocks
inside this will ...
Pen feature(s)
As the sprite moves across
the screen, it can place a
“pen” down to trace it’s
motions.
This feature can be...
Setting up the pen to
draw
Rationale / pseudo-code:
•Start / go to origin
•Clear screen
•Pen down
– Increase x
– Repeat
Adding a “y” control
For fun, let’s tie the y-axis
to the mouse
(notice that the blocks are of
different colors…)
Reset when it hits the end
“If this, then that…”
“If this, then that…”
Adding Sensors (PicoBoard)
Using the sensors
• Right click or ctl click for the menu
A little math…
Sensor readings range: 0 – 100.
Scale the number to fit our widow using two
points: sensor = 0, y = -180 ; ...
Math operators / order of operations:
Explore other sensors…
Add a second sprite & second line?
Advanced – Timing and data output
Introduce timer object  reports # of seconds
from start of program or since the “reset ...
Advanced – Timing and data output
Scaling the timer  480 pixels (points) in the x-
direction.
Creating a data list
Creating a data list
Finale
Right-click on the data list and…
Now what?
• Interested in professional development? Want to
learn more?
– Check-out our SparkFun Inventor’s Kit (SIK)
– Al...
Questions?
email: brian.huang@sparkfun.com
twitter: @bri_huang, @sparkfun, #nsta14
Interested in any of this?
E-mail us ab...
Scratch for Data Logging and Graphing
Scratch for Data Logging and Graphing
Scratch for Data Logging and Graphing
Scratch for Data Logging and Graphing
Scratch for Data Logging and Graphing
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Scratch for Data Logging and Graphing

660 views

Published on

Scratch is an open-source application developed at MIT to teach students as young as five years old to program using drag and drop blocks. Your students can quickly create interactive animations, games, or presentations for school.

We will uncover an often overlooked feature of Scratch and integrate external sensors and inputs through our PicoBoard. Learn to build data collection, graphing, and visualization in Scratch!

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
660
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
18
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • What is science? What is the nature of science? – Inquiry, Investigation, Experimentation…
    But, we’re past the ages of using rulers, stop watches, and old school techniques to investigate our world. How are real scientists doing it?
  • Scratch for Data Logging and Graphing

    1. 1. http://sfe.io/r74 @sparkfun #nsta14 Using graphing / data visualization as a Playground for Literacy and Mathematics
    2. 2. Scratch-ing the Surface of Programming and Enhancing Science Using graphing as a Playground for Literacy and Mathematics
    3. 3. Brian Huang, Linz Craig, Derek Runberg learn.sparkfun.com brian.huang@sparkfun.com @bri_huang @sparkfun
    4. 4. Pause… Before we move any further, let’s make sure that we all know each other in this room? Please introduce yourself to the person(s) sitting in your general vicinity. Tell them a few things about yourself, maybe: – where you’re from – what you teach – why you’re here – what you hope to get out of this….
    5. 5. Schedule • Introduction to Scratch, History • A few basic functions • Draw and graph • PicoBoard • Adding more functions
    6. 6. About Us At SparkFun, our focus is all about creation, innovation, and sharing information. Open Source Hardware is at the core of our business. We emphasize researching, re- mixing, adapting, making improvements, and sharing with the world!
    7. 7. “ Teacher s t hat make… Make gr eat t eacher s” -Anonymous
    8. 8. Scratch? • MIT Media Lab / Life-long Kindergarten Lab • Out growth of Seymour Papert
    9. 9. A few things.. • Free, http://scratch.mit.edu – Download version 1.4 • Open source • Create games, animations, & interactive environments • Interfaces with hardware: Picoboard, Makey Makey
    10. 10. Elements Vocabulary • Sprite / Costume • Stage / Background • Script / Blocks
    11. 11. The stage is a background or a “back-drop” for your project.. You can paint, import, or take a photo as your background. Multiple backgrounds may be used to create different scenes for a story or levels in a game.
    12. 12. Grid space for the stage is setup with a standard Cartesian coordinate system. The origin - (0,0) is in the center. Extents are: X: -240 to +240 Y: -180 to +180
    13. 13. Attributes of the sprite and the stage can be manipulated using a script or set of instructions. A script consists of a set of blocks that are “strung” together. Blocks are organized into 8 separate “bins” by how it affects the sprite →
    14. 14. 1. Modify your Sprite / Costume and the Stage / Background. 2. Use any of the 8 blocks (or copies of the blocks) to introduce yourself to the class. 3. Right-click on any block and select duplicate to make a copy.
    15. 15. General Usage Tips
    16. 16. A basic function
    17. 17. Cloning..
    18. 18. Creating a sprite The paint tools in Scratch are standard
    19. 19. Pretty neat, eh?
    20. 20. Hat Blocks Hat blocks all start with the key word “when” Hat blocks define the beginning of a script. Any blocks attached to this will execute (run) when the event XXXX occurs.
    21. 21. So, why Scratch? What else can it do? • Presentations • Animations / Simulations And...
    22. 22. GRAPHING!
    23. 23. Paint a simple sprite – just for data
    24. 24. Initialize the position of the sprite Recall: Grid space is X: -240 to +240, Y: -180 to +180
    25. 25. Introduce a loop or “forever” Blocks can be placed inside the “forever” bracket. Any and all code blocks inside this will repeat over and over… forever…
    26. 26. Pen feature(s) As the sprite moves across the screen, it can place a “pen” down to trace it’s motions. This feature can be used to sketch simple shapes, plan out maps, or graph data…
    27. 27. Setting up the pen to draw Rationale / pseudo-code: •Start / go to origin •Clear screen •Pen down – Increase x – Repeat
    28. 28. Adding a “y” control For fun, let’s tie the y-axis to the mouse (notice that the blocks are of different colors…)
    29. 29. Reset when it hits the end “If this, then that…”
    30. 30. “If this, then that…”
    31. 31. Adding Sensors (PicoBoard)
    32. 32. Using the sensors • Right click or ctl click for the menu
    33. 33. A little math… Sensor readings range: 0 – 100. Scale the number to fit our widow using two points: sensor = 0, y = -180 ; sensor = 100, y = +180
    34. 34. Math operators / order of operations:
    35. 35. Explore other sensors… Add a second sprite & second line?
    36. 36. Advanced – Timing and data output Introduce timer object  reports # of seconds from start of program or since the “reset timer” block was called.
    37. 37. Advanced – Timing and data output Scaling the timer  480 pixels (points) in the x- direction.
    38. 38. Creating a data list
    39. 39. Creating a data list
    40. 40. Finale
    41. 41. Right-click on the data list and…
    42. 42. Now what? • Interested in professional development? Want to learn more? – Check-out our SparkFun Inventor’s Kit (SIK) – Also sold as a lab-pack for schools – 15 complete circuits with a full-color experiment guide. – Guide is available as a PDF. • Teacher Prof. Dev Workshops available: – Contact: education@sparkfun.com
    43. 43. Questions? email: brian.huang@sparkfun.com twitter: @bri_huang, @sparkfun, #nsta14 Interested in any of this? E-mail us about our 20% educator discount – eservice@sparkfun.com

    ×