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Why would someone want to work for you?

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Article sample from the certificate in employer brand leadership, details at www.employerbrandinternational.com

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Why would someone want to work for you?

  1. 1. 10 Journal of Corporate Recruiting Leadership | crljournal.com | October 2010 ©2010 ERE Media, Inc. BRANDING If more companies had the answer to the question, “Why would someone want to work for us?” chances are we wouldn’t have the increasingly high levels of disengagement we do now amongst employees in companies around the world. The past few years have witnessed one of the most severe periods in economic history following the meltdown of the global financial system, which had its roots in the subprime mortgage market and took hold when Lehman Brothers filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in September 2008. The effect of the global financial crisis resulted in record rates of unemployment in many countries following years of growth, and some of the lowest unemployment rates for over 30-40 years.The recruitment drives which accelerated during the years of economic prosperity came to a screaming halt. Now, in 2010, many countries, such as Germany, China, and the U.S., are starting to show positive signs of econom- ic recovery, albeit at varying degrees.There is also still some concern over the recovery of the European economy.The legacy from the financial crisis has resulted in employees hav- ing to sacrifice a number of employment benefits they took for granted prior to the financial crisis, such as bonuses, com- pany cars, and investments in their training and development. In countries such as Australia, employees were asked to re- duce their five-day working week (and salary!) by one day. Many didn’t have a choice: it was either accept the reduc- tion in working hours (many were happy to do that!) and salary (many were unhappy to accept that!) or risk losing their job. During the economic downturn we also witnessed an ex- plosion in the adoption of social media worldwide.Today the world has become more connected and with this has come greater access to knowledge, cultural differences, and millions of websites where people are in a much better position to make an informed choice about where they want to work. Companies who were earlier adopters of social media for talent acquisition such as Sodexo, Starbucks, and Best Buy are now in a position to use this media to influence the em- ployment choice of passive and active candidates. Most peo- ple search online for information about companies, and so- cial media provides the opportunity to build a “fan” or “fol- lower” base which is similar to customer relationship man- agement platforms that came for before it.The difference is that people choose to “follow” companies and are not sim- ply put into a database and bombarded with messages of lit- tle relevance or impact. Social media provides an opportu- nity for companies to interact and engage with their target au- dience, and secondary to this is that people will form an opin- ion about what it is like to work for your company. Understanding which combination of employment attrib- utes at the rational (or functional) and emotional (or senso- ry) level have the strongest influence on a person’s employ- ment choice will contribute to a better understanding and ap- plication of the employer brand concept.Your employer brand is “the image of your organization as a ‘great place to work’” in the mind of current employees and key stakeholders in the external market (active and passive candidates, clients, cus- tomers, and other key stakeholders).A person’s image of your company is formed through the sum of high-touch and low- touch experiences it has with your company across multiple touchpoints (e.g. career website, interview, Facebook page, etc.) and has the ability to influence the employment choice of your target audience. The Influencers of Employment Choice To better understand what the key influencers or employ- ment choice are, Employer Brand International conducted a global research study and found that not all candidates are influenced by the same attributes. Complicating the matter further is that when we analysed the data we found differences by the country region, gender, age, organization type, posi- tion levels, and employment tenure. Why Would Someone Want to Work for You? A global study by Employer Brand International looking at what job candidates want, depending on factors such as age and gender. By Brett Minchington, Chairman and CEO, Employer Brand International
  2. 2. ©2010 ERE Media, Inc. Journal of Corporate Recruiting Leadership | crljournal.com | October 2010 11 BRANDING WHY WORK FOR YOU? 0.3 0.2 0.1 0 -0.1 -0.2 -0.3 increasinginfluence Figure 2: Influencers of employment choice, by age Figure 1: Influencers of employment choice - By gender 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Copyright: Employer Brand International Copyright: Employer Brand International 18-29 30-39 40-49 50+ Employer Brand Attributes 1. Corporate reputation 2. Thought Leadership 3. Performance Management 4. Internal Business Processes 5. Leadership 6. Innovation and Re-invention 7. Strategic Intent 8. Corporate Social Responsibility 9. Communications 10. Customer Relationships 11. Developing People 12. Measurement & Evaluation 13. Flexibility 14. Work Environment 15. Global Perspective 0.3 0.2 0.1 0 -0.1 -0.2 -0.3 increasinginfluence 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Male Female Employer Brand Attributes 1. Corporate reputation 2. Thought Leadership 3. Performance Management 4. Internal Business Processes 5. Leadership 6. Innovation and Re-invention 7. Strategic Intent 8. Corporate Social Responsibility 9. Communications 10. Customer Relationships 11. Developing People 12. Measurement & Evaluation 13. Flexibility 14. Work Environment 15. Global Perspective
  3. 3. 12 Journal of Corporate Recruiting Leadership | crljournal.com | October 2010 ©2010 ERE Media, Inc. BRANDING WHY WORK FOR YOU? 0.3 0.2 0.1 0 -0.1 -0.2 -0.3 increasinginfluence Figure 4: Influencers of employment choice - By position levels 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Copyright: Employer Brand International Administration Management Senior Management Executive Employer Brand Attributes 1. Corporate reputation 2. Thought Leadership 3. Performance Management 4. Internal Business Processes 5. Leadership 6. Innovation and Re-invention 7. Strategic Intent 8. Corporate Social Responsibility 9. Communications 10. Customer Relationships 11. Developing People 12. Measurement & Evaluation 13. Flexibility 14. Work Environment 15. Global Perspective 0.4 0.3 0.2 0.1 0 -0.1 -0.2 -0.3 -0.4 increasinginfluence Figure 3: Influencers of employment choice - By organization type 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Copyright: Employer Brand International Private NFP Government Employer Brand Attributes 1. Corporate reputation 2. Thought Leadership 3. Performance Management 4. Internal Business Processes 5. Leadership 6. Innovation and Re-invention 7. Strategic Intent 8. Corporate Social Responsibility 9. Communications 10. Customer Relationships 11. Developing People 12. Measurement & Evaluation 13. Flexibility 14. Work Environment 15. Global Perspective
  4. 4. ©2010 ERE Media, Inc. Journal of Corporate Recruiting Leadership | crljournal.com | October 2010 13 BRANDING WHY WORK FOR YOU? By Gender When comparing the results between genders, flexible working patterns is a significantly (six times more) stronger influencer of employment choice for females com- pared to males.Working for a company with a strong rep- utation and a friendly working environment is also a stronger influencer of employment choice for females (see Figure 1). The opportunity to work with thought leaders, an organ- ization with a culture of innovation (nearly twice as much), and a clearly defined mission (three times more) have a stronger influence on employment choice for males compared to females. By Age When comparing the results between age groups, being re- warded for performance decreases in strength of influence as age increases. It is twice as strong an influence for 18-29 year-olds compared to 40-49 year-olds.At 50+ years it drops off in influence tenfold (see Figure 2). A clearly defined mission increases as an influence of em- ployment choice as a person increases in age, with it twice as strong an influence for 40-49 year-olds compared to 18- 29 year-olds.Working for a company that provides a high level of customer service also increases in influence of em- ployment choice as age increases. It is nearly five times as strong an influence for 50+ year-olds compared to 18-29 year-olds. A friendly working environment is also a stronger influence of employment choice for younger age groups and declines with age (nearly three times stronger for 18-29 years com- pared to 50+ years). By Organization Types When comparing organization types, working for a com- pany with a strong reputation is twice as strong an influence of employment choice for the not-for-profit sector compared to government. The opportunity to work with thought leaders is nearly twice as strong an influence of employment choice for the private sector compared to government;being rewarded for perform- ance is three times stronger in influence in the private sec- tor compared to government;and working for a company with inspiring leadership is three times a stronger influence for pri- vate sector employees compared to not-for-profits and gov- ernment (see Figure 3). By Position Levels When comparing the results between position levels, working for inspiring leaders is a stronger influencer of em- ployment choice for executives compared to other position levels (two times stronger than Administration). Interestingly effective internal processes have less of an in- fluence on employment choice the higher the position level (see Figure 4). A company that offers high levels of customer service in- creases in influence of employment choice the higher the po- sition level, with nearly twice the influence strength for Ex- ecutives compared to Senior Management.Executives are less influenced by clearly defined career paths than positions low- er in the staffing hierarchy. Work flexibility is a much stronger influence for Adminis- tration staff compared to the other levels (nearly four times stronger than Executives). Surprisingly it was also a stronger influence of employment choice for senior managers compared to managers. The Implications Now, more than ever, influencing candidates to join your company will require a targeted recruitment strategy and com- munications approach.There is little value in recruiting tal- ent into your organization if you promise what you can’t de- liver or the candidate’s values are not aligned with the direc- tion your company is heading. Some of the key implications for your leaders to focus on to ensure recruitment messag- ing resonates and influences your target audience in their em- ployment choice include: 1. When planning your recruitment communications, al- ways bear in mind the different aspects you should fo- cus on when communicating to males and females. An offer of flexible working patterns and a friendly work en- vironment is a much stronger influencer of employment choice for women compared to men. Men are more in- fluenced by a company who offers a clearly defined mis- sion, a culture of innovation, and high levels of customer service. 2. We grow up in different cultures; therefore, we value dif- ferent things in life.Bear this in mind when planning a glob- al recruitment campaign. For example work flexibility will be relevant for employees from the U.S.,Canada,andAus- tralia, and not so much Europe. Don’t make assumptions
  5. 5. 14 Journal of Corporate Recruiting Leadership | crljournal.com | October 2010 ©2010 ERE Media, Inc. BRANDING WHY WORK FOR YOU? about other cultures; understand what is important for them. 3. We change with age. People over 55 tend to focus more on their impact to society, so no wonder they are the only group that is strongly influenced by your corporate social responsibility activities or customer relationships. On the other hand, they are far less influenced by strong leader- ship or performance management. 4. Many of your recruitment campaigns will focus around college graduates and entry-level positions.Remember they are looking for a good career start more so than some “big words” in your recruitment ads, as they don’t know yet what to really expect from work. It’s no surprise then that they don’t focus as much on leadership, strategic intent, or customer relations in employment choice.They will fo- cus more on the everyday aspects: new colleagues (work environment), clearly defined career path development, and global perspective. 5. The kind of organization you have also builds certain ex- pectations. People who are driven to work for private com- panies, governments, or not-for-profits value different things, and are attracted to organizations who can meet these expectations. Ensure the offering you are commu- nicating can be matched by your ability to deliver on it. 6. The research shows private company employees value lead- ership, rewards for performance, and global perspective much higher than their other colleagues in the not-for- profit and government sectors. On the other hand, gov- ernment employees value flexibility and corporate social responsibility. This comparison shows that different kinds of organizations usually hire different profiles of peo- ple, and it is really difficult for them to appeal to the same talents. 7. Do you have a different recruitment strategy for different position levels? Different position levels are like different market segments for marketing communications you con- duct for your products and services.They have different characteristics, needs, expectations, and most important- ly, goals. Understand your employees and help them achieve those goals. 8. People view employment offerings differently as they progress along their career path. Entry-level or admin- istrative workers will focus on how the company affects their life and work-life balance; hence the importance of flexibility, work environment, and developing people. Senior management and executives look more at the type of company you are, and are influenced by thought lead- ership, innovation, strategic intent, and customer rela- tionships. 9. If your challenge is retention, think about how your em- ployment offer changes with employees’ tenure.The most common mistake would be to offer a person the same ben- efit each time along the employment lifecycle,ignoring how the employee’s needs are changing. Employees differ in their expectations depending on how long they have been working for the same company. Global perspective is one example which is more important for young recruits, but eventually over the years it becomes less important in com- parison to corporate reputation or customer relationships. 10.Your line managers should play a crucial role in identi- fying the values which most attract employees and ensure they are aligned with the organization’s values.You can build up a framework model of how employees’ expecta- tions change over time and develop and equip your man- agers with the skills and capabilities to deliver on the prom- ises articulated during the recruitment campaign. Brett Minchington is the Chairman/CEO of Employer Brand International, and a global authority, strategist, and corporate advisor on employer branding.His new book,Employer Brand Leadership — A Global Perspective,is now available from the publisher at www.collectivelearningaustralia.com.
  6. 6. the practical business college THE GLOBAL STANDARD IN EMPLOYER BRAND LEADERSHIP TRANING & CERTIFICATION WE’RE GROWING FAST! Argentina Australia Brazil Canada Czech Republic France Georgia Greece India Lithuania Malaysia Mexico Netherlands New Zealand Peru Philippines Romania Russia Slovakia South Africa Spain Sri Lanka Sweden United Kingdom USA www.employerbrandingcollege.com A PERSONALIZED - PRACTICAL - WORLD CLASS EDUCATION EXPERIENCE THE DIFFERENCE TRUSTED TO TRAIN MORE THAN 20,000 LEADERS FROM 50 CITIES IN 30 COUNTRIES SINCE 2006 in partnership with EMPLOYER BRAND INTERNATIONAL
  7. 7. Certification demonstrating you are a competent Employer Brand Leader to the world's best practice standard. Monthly 1-1 coaching and mentoring support and unlimited online contact with course educators during Level 1&2 programs. You have 24/7/365 access to the world’s largest online employer branding library of more than 250 books, videos, case studies, articles, whitepapers, handbooks and global research reports. You will learn a deep understanding of the global and local trends impacting on the world at work and strategies to adapt to these changes. You will learn proven methodology, frameworks, strategies and tools to develop, implement, measure and manage an employer brand strategy to the world's best practice standard. You have access to educators with the latest thinking in employer branding. Ability to apply practical learnings to your own situation and be coached and mentored along your employer branding journey. Ongoing support as a member of an exclusive Alumni of leaders from more than 25 countries. You become a member once you enrol, not after the course. CERTIFICATION PERSONALIZATION INDUSTRY LEADING EMPLOYER BRAND THOUGHT LEADERSHIP LIBRARY ADAPT TO GLOBAL TRENDS STRATEGIC APPROACH LATEST THINKING PRACTICAL & RELEVANT EXCLUSIVE ALUMNI NETWORK 1-1 coaching and mentoring support Study anywhere-anytime-any device WHY LEADERS CHOOSE TO STUDY EMPLOYER BRAND LEADERSHIP WITH US
  8. 8. PROGRAM STRUCTURE Module Learning Focus Feature The Fundamentals of Employer Branding (EBLFU) Total Modules Core Modules Employer Brand Strategic Management (EBLSM) Elective Modules Course books (included) Access to module online resources Access to college online library 250+ publications Global alumni network Duration Study time per week Modules per month 1-1 skype coaching sessions (1.25 hrs) Assignments Employer Brand Analytics & Reporting (EBLAR) Employee and Customer Experience (EBLCE) Employer Branding and Social Responsibility (EBLSR) Future Trends in Employer Branding (EBLTD) Employer Brand Leadership Principles & Practices (EBLPP) Employer Branding Mapping & Competitor Analysis (EBLCA) Contemporary Practices in Employer Branding & Social Media (EBLEBSM) Employer Brand Strategy - Practical Workplace Assignment (EBLWA) Level 1 10 modules Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 2 6 modules Level 3 4 modules 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 elective choice Choose 2 Choose 2 4-5 months 3 months 2 months 1-2 hrs2-4 hrs2-6 hrs 2 Years 1 Year 3 Months Yes Yes Yes 2 2 2 6 3 1 3 1 1 2 1 1 10 6 4 4 210 0 elective choice elective choice elective choice elective choice elective choice elective choice Course Course Course elective choice X X X X X X COURSE COMPARISONS Level 2 - Foundations in Employer Brand Leadership 2 (6 modules) (4 core modules + choose 2 electives) Level 3 - Foundations in Employer Brand Leadership 3 (4 modules) (2 core modules + choose 2 electives) Level 1 - Certificate in Employer Brand Leadership (10 modules)
  9. 9. THE 10 POINT EMPLOYER BRANDING COLLEGE DIFFERENCE We have been training leaders in employer brand leadership since 2006. Building employer brand leadership capability is our core business and more than 20,000 leaders from companies such as Google, Chanel, Samsung, Mercedes Benz, PwC and Coca-Cola have participated in our training programs. Our courses are personalized. Whilst we deliver a global standard for all our courses, participants will have the benefit of participating in regular 1-1 coaching and mentoring sessions with courses leaders to personalize the theory and learnings specific to their situation. We will go out of our way to ensure you have a world class study experience. Our courses represent the global standard in employer brand leadership training and certification and our entire work ethic is focused on maintaining this position. The Level 1 Certificate in Employer Brand Leadership qualification issued by Employer Brand International is internationally accredited so you can be assured of its quality. You will have 24/7/365 access to the world's largest online employer branding library of more than 250 publications. We understand leaders are busy people and study at different times. This course will provide you with the skills, experiences and networks to become a highly credentialed employer brand leader sought after by industry. Your learning doesn't cease at the end of the program. Upon enrolment you will become a member of our exclusive Alumni and connect with leaders from around the world. You will enjoy exclusive access to regional meet ups, webinars, world's best practice content and case studies. Our qualification is the recognized symbol of employer brand leadership to the world class standard. Our course leaders are accessible and approachable throughout your studies, not just at set course times. Level 1 Certificate in Employer Brand Leadership provides an opportunity to be coached and mentored by Brett Minchington, a global authority in employer branding, whilst developing your employer brand strategy and/ or programs. PERSONALIZATION GLOBAL STANDARD 1-1 COACHING ACCESS TO THOUGHT LEADERS HIGHLY CREDENTIALED EXCLUSIVE ALUMNIWORLD'S LARGEST EMPLOYER BRANDING LIBRARY INDUSTRY RECOGNITION ACCREDITATION EXPERIENCE
  10. 10. A CERTIFICATION THAT WILL ADVANCE YOUR CAREER We are proud of our graduates who have worked hard to achieve their employer brand leadership qualification. There will be opportunities to meet in person at one of our Alumni functions held in regional locations. Upon enrolment in any Level 1-2 or 3 course you will be invited to join our growing Alumni group of leaders from diverse backgrounds and seniority from more than 25 countries. Graduates from our well-established International program have come from a range of industries, company size and experiences including: • An International perspective towards learning, collaboration and work; • Is a life-long learner with the skill to pursue personal development to continually enhance learning, skill and experience; • Can work autonomously and collaboratively as an employer brand leader; • Is committed to act with ethical action and is a socially responsible corporate citizen; • Operates effectively and efficiently with sufficient knowledge and depth to begin employment as an employer brand manager; They are confident their certification is the world's leading employer brand qualification and will be highly regarded by their current and future employers. Our graduates demonstrate the following career competencies Exclusive Global Alumni www.employerbrandingcollege.com • Employer Brand and Social Media Manager • HR Process Manager • General Manager Human Resources • Global Employer Brand Manager • Manager, Employer Brand and Recruitment Marketing • Employer Brand Manager • Employer Value Proposition Manager • People & Culture Advisor • CEO • Senior Human Resources Manager • Attraction and Employability Manager • Human Resources Manager • Human Resources Officer • Marketing Manager • Marketing Officer • Managing Director • General Manager, Employer Branding Agency • Talent Management Coordinator • HR & Employee Relations Specialist • Employer Brand Marketing Consultant • Consulting Principal • Talent Management Consultant • Head of Talent Sourcing • Head of Research • Project & Operations Manager • Group Executive, Operations & HR • Human Resources Director • Human Resources Specialist • Recruitment Program Specialist • Senior Manager Transformation & Culture Change
  11. 11. andrea@employerbrandingcollege.com +61 8 8443 4115 www.employerbrandingcollege www.facebook.com/employerbrandingcollege www.twitter.com/hashtag/employerbrandingcollege www.linkedin.com/company/3651279 the practical business college

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