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At risk student populations

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At risk student populations

  1. 1. At Risk (Student populations) Presented by: Brent Daigle, Ph.D.
  2. 2. georgia statistics 56% graduation
  3. 3. georgia statistics 44% dropout
  4. 4. georgia statistics 300,000+ poverty
  5. 5. at-risk studentshard to define [controversial] Presented by: Brent Daigle, Ph.D.
  6. 6. a few definitions: at-risk studentsfail to achieve basic proficiencyin core subjects by 8th gradePresented by: Brent Daigle, Ph.D.
  7. 7. a few definitions: at-risk students Do not graduate with necessary skills for:workleisureculturecivic affairsinter/intra personal relationshipsPresented by: Brent Daigle, Ph.D.
  8. 8. a few definitions: at-risk studentsAt risk when students are placed in anenvironment for which they were not prepared ! [4 levels of educational risk]Presented by: Brent Daigle, Ph.D.
  9. 9. a few definitions: at-risk studentsAt risk when students are placed in anenvironment for which they were not prepared ! Microrisk (classroom interaction)Presented by: Brent Daigle, Ph.D.
  10. 10. a few definitions: at-risk studentsAt risk when students are placed in anenvironment for which they were not prepared ! Mesorisk (domestic interaction)Presented by: Brent Daigle, Ph.D.
  11. 11. a few definitions: at-risk studentsAt risk when students are placed in anenvironment for which they were not prepared ! Exorisk (community interaction)Presented by: Brent Daigle, Ph.D.
  12. 12. a few definitions: at-risk studentsAt risk when students are placed in anenvironment for which they were not prepared ! Macrorisk (sociocultural interaction)Presented by: Brent Daigle, Ph.D.
  13. 13. Indicators: at-risk students exceptionality Presented by: Brent Daigle, Ph.D.
  14. 14. Indicators: at-risk students limited english proficiency Presented by: Brent Daigle, Ph.D.
  15. 15. Indicators: at-risk students poverty Presented by: Brent Daigle, Ph.D.
  16. 16. Indicators: at-risk students educational deprivation Presented by: Brent Daigle, Ph.D.
  17. 17. Indicators: at-risk students minority group Presented by: Brent Daigle, Ph.D.
  18. 18. Indicators: at-risk studentslack of home/community resources Presented by: Brent Daigle, Ph.D.
  19. 19. poverty: at-risk studentspoverty poses a serious challenge to children’saccess to quality learning opportunities andtheir potential to succeed in schoolPresented by: Brent Daigle, Ph.D.
  20. 20. at-riskhigh teacher attrition rate: students Presented by: Brent Daigle, Ph.D.
  21. 21. effective instructional practices: at-risk students a caring attitudePresented by: Brent Daigle, Ph.D.
  22. 22. at-riskeffective instructional practices: studentsassertiveness & authority Presented by: Brent Daigle, Ph.D.
  23. 23. effective instructional practices: at-risk studentspositive communicative environmentPresented by: Brent Daigle, Ph.D.
  24. 24. at-riskeffective instructional practices: studentspositive communicative environment [communication differences] Presented by: Brent Daigle, Ph.D.
  25. 25. at-riskeffective instructional practices: students demanding effort Presented by: Brent Daigle, Ph.D.
  26. 26. at-riskeffective instructional practices: studentspersonal relationship individual attention mutual respect Presented by: Brent Daigle, Ph.D.
  27. 27. at-riskeffective instructional practices: students caring learning community
  28. 28. at-riskeffective instructional practices: studentsbusiness-like learning community Presented by: Brent Daigle, Ph.D.
  29. 29. Presented by: Brent Daigle, Ph.D.

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