Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Power point part 1

1,771 views

Published on

Power Point Part 1
EDU 290 T TH 11:00

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Power point part 1

  1. 1. PoetryA Fourth Grade Lesson About Poetry Vocabulary and Types. Micalah Brennan EDU 290 Tuesday/Thursday 11:00 am with Dr. Merrill
  2. 2. What Is Poetry? Used To:
  3. 3. What Is Poetry? Used To:Tell a story, Express feeling
  4. 4. What Is Poetry? Used To:Tell a story, Express feelingPlease the ear
  5. 5. What Is Poetry? Used To:Tell a story, Express feelingPlease the earDelight the eye
  6. 6. What Is Poetry? Used To:Tell a story, Express feelingPlease the earDelight the eyeImages can enhance senses
  7. 7. Genre Vocabulary
  8. 8. Genre VocabularyBeats: the stressed syllables in a line of poetry
  9. 9. Genre VocabularyBeats: the stressed syllables in a line of poetryImagery: word pictures created through the use offigurative language or vivid descriptions
  10. 10. Genre VocabularyBeats: the stressed syllables in a line of poetryImagery: word pictures created through the use offigurative language or vivid descriptionsLines: rows of words
  11. 11. Genre VocabularyBeats: the stressed syllables in a line of poetryImagery: word pictures created through the use offigurative language or vivid descriptionsLines: rows of wordsRepetition: a repeating patter of sounds or words
  12. 12. Genre Vocabulary
  13. 13. Genre VocabularyRhyme: agreement in the final sounds of words
  14. 14. Genre VocabularyRhyme: agreement in the final sounds of wordsRhythm: a regular pattern of beats
  15. 15. Genre VocabularyRhyme: agreement in the final sounds of wordsRhythm: a regular pattern of beatsSense words: words that appeal to senses of sight,hearing, smell, taste, or touch
  16. 16. Genre VocabularyRhyme: agreement in the final sounds of wordsRhythm: a regular pattern of beatsSense words: words that appeal to senses of sight,hearing, smell, taste, or touchStanzas: groups of lines that make up the divisions ofa poem
  17. 17. How does it know,“The Seed” this little seed, if it is to grow to a flower or weed, if it is to be a vine or shoot, or grow to a tree with a long deep root? A seed is so small, where do you suppose it stores up all of the things it knows? By Aileen Fisher
  18. 18. How does it know,“The Seed” this little seed, if it is to growBeats: X to a flower or weed,Imagery: X if it is to beLines: XRepetition: X a vine or shoot,Rhyme: X or grow to a treeRhythm: XSense Words: X with a long deep root?Stanzas: X A seed is so small, where do you suppose it stores up all of the things it knows? By Aileen Fisher
  19. 19. Poetry Notes Word Bank:beats repetition sense words imagery rhyme stanzas lines rhythm
  20. 20. Poetry NotesA poem may have short or long _____ arranged in groups called ______To help us see, hear, smell, taste, and touch poets use ________Poets also use _______ to help us form pictures in our mindsWe should read poems aloud to hear the _____ that comes from the ____ of the syllables.We can also listen for the _______ of sounds, words, and lines.Similar ending sounds are heard in words that _______ Word Bank: beats repetition sense words imagery rhyme stanzas lines rhythm
  21. 21. Answers to Poetry Notes
  22. 22. Answers to Poetry NotesA poem may have short or long lines arranged in groups called stanzas
  23. 23. Answers to Poetry NotesA poem may have short or long lines arranged in groups called stanzasTo help us see, hear, smell, taste, and touch poets use sense words
  24. 24. Answers to Poetry NotesA poem may have short or long lines arranged in groups called stanzasTo help us see, hear, smell, taste, and touch poets use sense wordsPoets also use imagery to help us form pictures in our minds
  25. 25. Answers to Poetry NotesA poem may have short or long lines arranged in groups called stanzasTo help us see, hear, smell, taste, and touch poets use sense wordsPoets also use imagery to help us form pictures in our mindsWe should read poems aloud to hear the rhythm that comes from the beats of the syllables.
  26. 26. Answers to Poetry NotesA poem may have short or long lines arranged in groups called stanzasTo help us see, hear, smell, taste, and touch poets use sense wordsPoets also use imagery to help us form pictures in our mindsWe should read poems aloud to hear the rhythm that comes from the beats of the syllables.We can also listen for the repetition of sounds, words, and lines.
  27. 27. Answers to Poetry NotesA poem may have short or long lines arranged in groups called stanzasTo help us see, hear, smell, taste, and touch poets use sense wordsPoets also use imagery to help us form pictures in our mindsWe should read poems aloud to hear the rhythm that comes from the beats of the syllables.We can also listen for the repetition of sounds, words, and lines.Similar ending sounds are heard in words that rhyme
  28. 28. All About A PoemRead the poem, then use words from the box to complete the description below
  29. 29. All About A Poem Read the poem, then use words from the box to complete the description belowThe Hungry Toaster I slip a slice of soft white bread Into my toaster’s jaws. It grabs the bread and pulls it down With greedy metal paws. I think my toaster would prefer Another kind of snack, Because a minute later, It throws my bread right back
  30. 30. All About A Poem Read the poem, then use words from the box to complete the description belowThe Hungry Toaster I slip a slice of soft white bread Into my toaster’s jaws. It grabs the bread and pulls it down With greedy metal paws. Questions: I think my toaster would prefer This poem has eight _____ Another kind of snack, They are arranged in two _____ Because a minute later, As you say the first line, tap out four strong _____ It throws my bread right back The whole poem has a bouncy, playful _____ The words jaws and paws and the words snack and back _____ Listen for the _____ of the beginning sounds in slip and slice The comparison of a toaster to a hungry animal is ______ The poet also uses _______ like soft and white
  31. 31. All About A Poem Read the poem, then use words from the box to complete the description belowThe Hungry Toaster Vocabulary: I slip a slice of soft white bread Beats Into my toaster’s jaws. Imagery It grabs the bread and pulls it down Lines With greedy metal paws. Repetition Questions: Rhyme I think my toaster would prefer This poem has eight _____ Rhythm Another kind of snack, They are arranged in two _____ Sense words Because a minute later, As you say the first line, tap out four strong _____ Stanzas It throws my bread right back The whole poem has a bouncy, playful _____ The words jaws and paws and the words snack and back _____ Listen for the _____ of the beginning sounds in slip and slice The comparison of a toaster to a hungry animal is ______ The poet also uses _______ like soft and white
  32. 32. The Hungry Toaster I slip a slice of soft white bread Into my toaster’s jaws. It grabs the bread and pulls it down With greedy metal paws. I think my toaster would prefer Questions: Another kind of snack, Because a minute later, This poem has eight lines It throws my bread right back They are arranged in two stanzas As you say the first line, tap out four strong beats The whole poem has a bouncy, playful rhythm The words jaws and paws and the words snack and back rhyme Listen for the repetition of the beginning sounds in slip and slice The comparison of a toaster to a hungry animal is imagery The poet also uses sense words like soft and white
  33. 33. Types of Poems
  34. 34. Types of PoemsImagery: images created by words
  35. 35. Types of PoemsImagery: images created by wordsPersonification: giving objects human traits and qualities
  36. 36. Types of PoemsImagery: images created by wordsPersonification: giving objects human traits and qualitiesComparison: connection between two objects
  37. 37. Types of PoemsImagery: images created by wordsPersonification: giving objects human traits and qualitiesComparison: connection between two objectsWord Play: humorous poem
  38. 38. Imagery Poem: Images Created by Words The sun was shining on the sea, Shining with all his might: He did his very best to make The billows smooth and bright - And this was odd, because it was The middle of the night.         (Lewis Carroll) 
  39. 39. Personification Poem:Giving Objects Human Traits and Qualities Dinnertime Chorus The teapot sang as the water boiled The ice cubes cackled in their glass the teacups chattered to one another. While the chairs were passing gas The gravy gurgled merrily As the oil danced in a pan. Oh my dinnertime chorus What a lovely, lovely clan! by Sharon Hendricks
  40. 40. A pumpkin’s like a full moon Comparison: Sitting round and low - In the starry evening, The pumpkin seems to glow!Connections between two objects A pumpkin is like a  (noun) (verb ending in -ing) (adjective)  and (adjective) (preposition – when, in, around, etc) and (place or time) (Completion of the comparison) Kelly Wilson
  41. 41. On the thirty third of Januaugust, right before Octember,Word Play: a strange thing didnt happen that I always wont remember. At eleven in the afternoon,Humorous Poems while making midnight brunch, I poured a glass of sandwiches and baked a plate of punch. Then I climbed up on my head to see A parade began to end the silver sky of green, and music started not to play, and danced around my feet because as rain came out and snowed all night Id turned eleventeen. that warm and sunny day. That was how it didnt happen as I keenly dont remember, on the thirty third of Januaugust, right before Octember. --Kenn Nesbitt
  42. 42. Works CitedImage on slide 5 : http://www.presentermedia.com/index.php?target=closeup&maincat=clipart&id=3973Imagery Poem: Children’s Literature Website http://www2.nkfust.edu.tw/~emchen/CLit/poetry_language.htmPersonification Poem: My Word Wizard Website http://www.mywordwizard.com/personification-poems.htmlComparison Poem: Online Teaching Resource Center http://www.trcabc.com/resources/kellyscorner/pumpkin-patrol-poems-and-songs/Word Play Poem:Ken Nisbitt’s Poetry 4 Kids http://www.poetry4kids.com/cat-Wordplay.htmlMain Source of Information: Cooper, David, and John J. Pikulski. Traditions. Teachers Edition ed. Boston: Houghton Mifflin,2006. 515-17. Print.

×