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Linux BPF Superpowers

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Linux BPF Superpowers

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Video: https://www.facebook.com/atscaleevents/videos/1693888610884236/ . Talk by Brendan Gregg from Facebook's Performance @Scale: "Linux performance analysis has been the domain of ancient tools and metrics, but that's now changing in the Linux 4.x series. A new tracer is available in the mainline kernel, built from dynamic tracing (kprobes, uprobes) and enhanced BPF (Berkeley Packet Filter), aka, eBPF. It allows us to measure latency distributions for file system I/O and run queue latency, print details of storage device I/O and TCP retransmits, investigate blocked stack traces and memory leaks, and a whole lot more. These lead to performance wins large and small, especially when instrumenting areas that previously had zero visibility. This talk will summarize this new technology and some long-standing issues that it can solve, and how we intend to use it at Netflix."

Video: https://www.facebook.com/atscaleevents/videos/1693888610884236/ . Talk by Brendan Gregg from Facebook's Performance @Scale: "Linux performance analysis has been the domain of ancient tools and metrics, but that's now changing in the Linux 4.x series. A new tracer is available in the mainline kernel, built from dynamic tracing (kprobes, uprobes) and enhanced BPF (Berkeley Packet Filter), aka, eBPF. It allows us to measure latency distributions for file system I/O and run queue latency, print details of storage device I/O and TCP retransmits, investigate blocked stack traces and memory leaks, and a whole lot more. These lead to performance wins large and small, especially when instrumenting areas that previously had zero visibility. This talk will summarize this new technology and some long-standing issues that it can solve, and how we intend to use it at Netflix."

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