Evaluating the educational effectiveness of scientific visualisations in Year 11 Physics education David Geelan – The Univ...
Rationale <ul><ul><li>Scientific visualizations – visual representations of scientific data as well as of objects and inte...
Rationale <ul><li>There has been little formal research work, particularly quantitative research, which specifically addre...
Research Question <ul><li>Is teaching with the use of scientific visualizations more effective than teaching without visua...
Methodology <ul><li>Crossover research design </li></ul><ul><li>10-12 Physics teachers, each with up to 25 students </li><...
<ul><li>Sub-analyses by:  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>gender,  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>physics achievement level (low, medium...
Two concepts <ul><li>Accelerated motion in a straight line  (i.e. in 1 dimension), with particular attention to the situat...
 
 
Pre- and Post-tests <ul><li>Based on the Force Concepts Inventory, but extended for the first concept </li></ul><ul><li>12...
Sample Item <ul><li>A boy throws a steel ball straight up.  </li></ul><ul><li>Consider the motion of the ball only after i...
<ul><li>For these conditions the force(s) acting on the ball is (are): </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>a downward force of gravi...
Results and Conclusion <ul><li>Teachers recruited, three workshops, topics chosen, tests developed and tested </li></ul><u...
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Evaluating the effectiveness of scientific visualizations in physics

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Evaluating the effectiveness of scientific visualizations in physics

  1. 1. Evaluating the educational effectiveness of scientific visualisations in Year 11 Physics education David Geelan – The University of Queensland Brian Martin and Peter Mahaffy – The King’s University College, Edmonton, Canada
  2. 2. Rationale <ul><ul><li>Scientific visualizations – visual representations of scientific data as well as of objects and interactions – are an increasingly important set of tools used by scientists in their work. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Visualizations are also increasingly being used in science teaching. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Extravagant claims (e.g. Bell, Park & Toti, 2004; Kozhevnikov & Thornton, 2006) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Encouraging results (e.g. Cifuentes & Hsieh, 2001; Dori & Belcher, 2005; Hakerem, 1993; Hinrichs, 2004; Royuk & Brooks, 2003; Williamson & Abraham, 1995) </li></ul></ul>
  3. 3. Rationale <ul><li>There has been little formal research work, particularly quantitative research, which specifically addresses the educational effectiveness of teaching with scientific visualisations, particularly at the secondary school level. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Research Question <ul><li>Is teaching with the use of scientific visualizations more effective than teaching without visualisations for supporting students’ conceptual development of specific concepts in Physics? </li></ul><ul><li>Independent variable – the teaching of the physics concepts with or without visualization. </li></ul><ul><li>Dependent variable – conceptual development, understood as change in conceptual understanding between pre-instruction and post-instruction situations, measured using tests based on the Force Concepts Inventory (Hestenes, Wells & Swackhamer, 1992). </li></ul>
  5. 5. Methodology <ul><li>Crossover research design </li></ul><ul><li>10-12 Physics teachers, each with up to 25 students </li></ul><ul><li>Each teaches one concept with visualisations and one without </li></ul><ul><li>Each class and teacher acts as its own control group </li></ul>
  6. 6. <ul><li>Sub-analyses by: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>gender, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>physics achievement level (low, medium, high) and </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>(possibly) learning style </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Quantitative data complemented by: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>reflective notes from workshops </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>classroom observations </li></ul></ul>
  7. 7. Two concepts <ul><li>Accelerated motion in a straight line (i.e. in 1 dimension), with particular attention to the situation where the velocity and acceleration are in opposite directions </li></ul><ul><li>Newton’s First Law of Motion - objects remain at rest or at constant velocity unless acted on by a force </li></ul>
  8. 10. Pre- and Post-tests <ul><li>Based on the Force Concepts Inventory, but extended for the first concept </li></ul><ul><li>12 multiple-choice items </li></ul><ul><li>Correct scientific concept and 4 common student misconceptions </li></ul>
  9. 11. Sample Item <ul><li>A boy throws a steel ball straight up. </li></ul><ul><li>Consider the motion of the ball only after it has left the boy’s hand but before it reaches the ground, and assume that forces exerted by the air are negligible. </li></ul>
  10. 12. <ul><li>For these conditions the force(s) acting on the ball is (are): </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>a downward force of gravity along with a steadily decreasing upward force </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>a steadily decreasing upward force from the moment it leaves the boy’s hand until it reaches its highest point; on the way down there is a steadily increasing downward force of gravity as the object gets closer to the earth </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>an almost constant downward force of gravity along with an upward force that steadily decreases until the ball reaches its highest point; on the way down there is only the constant downward force of gravity </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>an almost constant downward force of gravity only </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>none of the above. The ball falls back to the ground because of its natural tendency to rest on the surface of the earth </li></ul></ul></ul>
  11. 13. Results and Conclusion <ul><li>Teachers recruited, three workshops, topics chosen, tests developed and tested </li></ul><ul><li>Due to the particular concepts chosen, data collection was postponed from 2008 to the first half of 2009 </li></ul><ul><li>Chemistry study will also be conducted in 2009 </li></ul><ul><li>If you want to see the results, come to AARE 2009! </li></ul>

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