Successfully reported this slideshow.
Art Appreciation<br />Chapters 4 & 5<br />
LINE<br />A path traced by a moving point or a mark with the point being the smallest of all visual elements.<br />Movemen...
SHAPE<br />a 2-dimensional form that occupies an area with identifiable boundaries.<br />---------------------------------...
The Madonna of the Meadows, Raphael, 1505, oil on panel<br />
The Raven and the First Men, Bill Reid, 1983, Laminated yellow cedar<br />
SPACE<br />In 3-dimensions, an area in which anything with mass exists. <br />In 2-dimensions, it only has height and widt...
The Nose,Alberto Giacometti, 1947<br />
VALUE<br />The relative lightness or darkness of a color in relation to another, as well as the relationship of light to d...
COLOR<br />A function of light where the physiological activity of the human eye and the science of electromagnetic wavele...
LIGHT<br />A type of radiant energy that reveals the world of forms and spatial relationships.<br />Actual light – Natural...
1978-79<br />
1986-87<br />
TEXTURE<br />A quality experienced through touch or through touch visualization.<br />
PATTERN<br />A decorative repeating motif or design.<br />
PERSPECTIVE<br />Any system for depicting the illusion of 3-dimensional space on a 2-dimensional surface.<br />LINEAR pers...
One-point Linear Perspective<br />
Two-point Linear Perspective<br />
TIME<br />A progression or sequence that creates an actual or implied sense of life/time passing.<br />Time is the element...
MOTION<br />An actual (kinetic) or implied sense of movement.<br />
Calder, flamingo<br />
Danube bicycle<br />http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LeBiqVJrJ08&feature=PlayList&p=BA532D06AA211E8E&index=17<br />
Arthur Ganson, “Machine with concrete”<br />http://www.boingboing.net/2009/09/15/motor-attached-to-se.html<br />
End of chapter 4<br />The Visual Elements<br />------<br />Begin chapter 5<br />Principles of Design<br />
UNITY<br />A sense of oneness, of things belonging together and making a coherent whole.<br />
VARIETY<br />The difference between objects using any of the visual elements.<br />
Black Face and Arm Unit, Ben Jones,1971, Painted Plaster<br />
Black Face and Arm Unit, Ben Jones,1971, Painted Plaster<br />
Joseph Cornell, Habitat Group for a Shooting Gallery, 1943<br />
Joseph Cornell, Untitled (The Hotel Eden), c. 1945<br />
Joseph Cornell, Untitled (Paul and Virginia), c. 1946-48<br />
Joseph Cornell, Untitled (Pharmacy), 1943<br />
Jackson Pollock, Shimmering Substance, 1946<br />
BALANCE<br />In either 2-D or 3-D, the visual “heaviness” or “lightness” of forms arranged in a composition.<br />Symmetri...
L. Brent Kington, <br />
Georgia O’Keeffe, Deer’s Skull with Pedernal, 1936<br />
Frida Kahlo, The Two Fridas, 1939<br />
Gustav Klimt, Death and Life, before 1911<br />
Sakai Hoitsu, Summer Rain, late 18th century<br />
EdouardManet, A Bar at the Folies-Bergere, 1881-82<br />
Rose Window, Notre Dame, Paris<br />
SUBORDINATION<br />Certain areas of a composition purposely made less visually interesting.<br />
EMPHASIS<br />A certain part of the composition that has the viewer’s attention, especially small, clearly defined areas s...
Henry Ossawa Tanner, The Banjo Lesson, 1893<br />
Paul Cezanne, Still Life with Compotier, Pitcher, and Fruit, 1892-94<br />
Executions of the Third of May, 1808, Francisco de Goya,  1814-15<br />
SCALE<br />Size in relation to a standard or “normal” size.<br />	--------------------------------------------------------...
Oldenburg and van Bruggen, Plantoir, 2001<br />
Rene Magritte, Delusions of Grandeur II, 1948<br />
Leonardo da Vinci, Vitruvian Man, 1485-90<br />
RHYTHM<br />Can be based on repetition of any of the visual elements.<br />
Piet Mondrian, Broadway Boogie-Woogie, 1942-43<br />
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Art apprec ch4 5

1,284 views

Published on

  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Art apprec ch4 5

  1. 1. Art Appreciation<br />Chapters 4 & 5<br />
  2. 2.
  3. 3.
  4. 4.
  5. 5.
  6. 6. LINE<br />A path traced by a moving point or a mark with the point being the smallest of all visual elements.<br />Movement, direction and emphasis implied by lines convey different characteristics and psychological effects.<br />Types of lines: <br />actual, implied, incised, raised, contour, variation, cross-hatched, lines formed by edges<br />Linear forms are interpreted as lines<br />
  7. 7.
  8. 8.
  9. 9.
  10. 10.
  11. 11.
  12. 12.
  13. 13.
  14. 14.
  15. 15.
  16. 16.
  17. 17.
  18. 18.
  19. 19.
  20. 20.
  21. 21.
  22. 22. SHAPE<br />a 2-dimensional form that occupies an area with identifiable boundaries.<br />----------------------------------------------------------------<br />a 3-dimensional form that occupies a volume of space.<br />MASS<br />
  23. 23. The Madonna of the Meadows, Raphael, 1505, oil on panel<br />
  24. 24. The Raven and the First Men, Bill Reid, 1983, Laminated yellow cedar<br />
  25. 25. SPACE<br />In 3-dimensions, an area in which anything with mass exists. <br />In 2-dimensions, it only has height and width, but no depth.<br />It is a limited or unlimited area appearing to advance, recede, or extend in all directions.<br />
  26. 26. The Nose,Alberto Giacometti, 1947<br />
  27. 27.
  28. 28.
  29. 29.
  30. 30. VALUE<br />The relative lightness or darkness of a color in relation to another, as well as the relationship of light to dark.<br />Hue – the name used to distinguish one color from another. The word “hue” is used interchangeably with the term “color.”<br />Tint – a color lighter than the hue’s normal value. Adding white usually produces a tint.<br />Shade – a color darker than the hue’s normal value. Adding black usually produces a shade.<br />
  31. 31.
  32. 32.
  33. 33.
  34. 34.
  35. 35.
  36. 36. COLOR<br />A function of light where the physiological activity of the human eye and the science of electromagnetic wavelengths are the process necessary for it function.<br />Color are the components of light revealed when refracted through a prism.<br />When arranged on a color wheel, colors are labeled: primary, secondary and tertiary<br />
  37. 37.
  38. 38.
  39. 39.
  40. 40.
  41. 41.
  42. 42.
  43. 43.
  44. 44. LIGHT<br />A type of radiant energy that reveals the world of forms and spatial relationships.<br />Actual light – Natural light. Light produced by electricity. In art, this type of light is used in architecture and some sculpture.<br />The illusion of light – Light which is created in an artwork by the use of paint or another medium. The artist most often creates this illusion with value changes.<br />
  45. 45.
  46. 46.
  47. 47.
  48. 48.
  49. 49.
  50. 50.
  51. 51.
  52. 52.
  53. 53.
  54. 54.
  55. 55.
  56. 56.
  57. 57.
  58. 58.
  59. 59. 1978-79<br />
  60. 60.
  61. 61.
  62. 62.
  63. 63. 1986-87<br />
  64. 64.
  65. 65.
  66. 66.
  67. 67.
  68. 68.
  69. 69.
  70. 70.
  71. 71.
  72. 72.
  73. 73. TEXTURE<br />A quality experienced through touch or through touch visualization.<br />
  74. 74.
  75. 75.
  76. 76. PATTERN<br />A decorative repeating motif or design.<br />
  77. 77.
  78. 78.
  79. 79. PERSPECTIVE<br />Any system for depicting the illusion of 3-dimensional space on a 2-dimensional surface.<br />LINEAR perspective (also called scientific)<br />one-point -- two-point<br />Isometric perspective<br />Aerial perspective<br />Ground perspective<br />
  80. 80. One-point Linear Perspective<br />
  81. 81. Two-point Linear Perspective<br />
  82. 82.
  83. 83.
  84. 84.
  85. 85.
  86. 86.
  87. 87.
  88. 88.
  89. 89.
  90. 90.
  91. 91.
  92. 92.
  93. 93.
  94. 94.
  95. 95. TIME<br />A progression or sequence that creates an actual or implied sense of life/time passing.<br />Time is the element in which we live. It is sometimes referred to as the forth dimension.<br />
  96. 96.
  97. 97.
  98. 98.
  99. 99.
  100. 100.
  101. 101. MOTION<br />An actual (kinetic) or implied sense of movement.<br />
  102. 102.
  103. 103.
  104. 104.
  105. 105.
  106. 106. Calder, flamingo<br />
  107. 107. Danube bicycle<br />http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LeBiqVJrJ08&feature=PlayList&p=BA532D06AA211E8E&index=17<br />
  108. 108. Arthur Ganson, “Machine with concrete”<br />http://www.boingboing.net/2009/09/15/motor-attached-to-se.html<br />
  109. 109.
  110. 110. End of chapter 4<br />The Visual Elements<br />------<br />Begin chapter 5<br />Principles of Design<br />
  111. 111. UNITY<br />A sense of oneness, of things belonging together and making a coherent whole.<br />
  112. 112. VARIETY<br />The difference between objects using any of the visual elements.<br />
  113. 113. Black Face and Arm Unit, Ben Jones,1971, Painted Plaster<br />
  114. 114. Black Face and Arm Unit, Ben Jones,1971, Painted Plaster<br />
  115. 115.
  116. 116. Joseph Cornell, Habitat Group for a Shooting Gallery, 1943<br />
  117. 117. Joseph Cornell, Untitled (The Hotel Eden), c. 1945<br />
  118. 118. Joseph Cornell, Untitled (Paul and Virginia), c. 1946-48<br />
  119. 119. Joseph Cornell, Untitled (Pharmacy), 1943<br />
  120. 120. Jackson Pollock, Shimmering Substance, 1946<br />
  121. 121. BALANCE<br />In either 2-D or 3-D, the visual “heaviness” or “lightness” of forms arranged in a composition.<br />Symmetrical Balance<br />Asymmetrical Balance<br />
  122. 122. L. Brent Kington, <br />
  123. 123. Georgia O’Keeffe, Deer’s Skull with Pedernal, 1936<br />
  124. 124. Frida Kahlo, The Two Fridas, 1939<br />
  125. 125.
  126. 126.
  127. 127.
  128. 128.
  129. 129.
  130. 130.
  131. 131. Gustav Klimt, Death and Life, before 1911<br />
  132. 132. Sakai Hoitsu, Summer Rain, late 18th century<br />
  133. 133.
  134. 134.
  135. 135. EdouardManet, A Bar at the Folies-Bergere, 1881-82<br />
  136. 136. Rose Window, Notre Dame, Paris<br />
  137. 137. SUBORDINATION<br />Certain areas of a composition purposely made less visually interesting.<br />
  138. 138. EMPHASIS<br />A certain part of the composition that has the viewer’s attention, especially small, clearly defined areas such as the focal point.<br />
  139. 139. Henry Ossawa Tanner, The Banjo Lesson, 1893<br />
  140. 140. Paul Cezanne, Still Life with Compotier, Pitcher, and Fruit, 1892-94<br />
  141. 141. Executions of the Third of May, 1808, Francisco de Goya, 1814-15<br />
  142. 142. SCALE<br />Size in relation to a standard or “normal” size.<br /> -------------------------------------------------------------<br />The size relationships between parts of a whole or between two or more items perceived as a unit.<br />PROPORTION<br />
  143. 143. Oldenburg and van Bruggen, Plantoir, 2001<br />
  144. 144. Rene Magritte, Delusions of Grandeur II, 1948<br />
  145. 145. Leonardo da Vinci, Vitruvian Man, 1485-90<br />
  146. 146. RHYTHM<br />Can be based on repetition of any of the visual elements.<br />
  147. 147. Piet Mondrian, Broadway Boogie-Woogie, 1942-43<br />

×