Art apprec ch1-3

3,207 views

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
3,207
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
24
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
57
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Art apprec ch1-3

  1. 1. Art Appreciation<br />Spring 2010<br />Chapters 1, 2 & 3<br />
  2. 2. Brancusi studio<br />
  3. 3.
  4. 4. Brancusi, Endless Column<br />
  5. 5. Brancusi, Bird in Space<br />
  6. 6. Cave Paintings from Chauvet cave, Francec. 25,000 – 17,000 BCE<br />
  7. 7.
  8. 8.
  9. 9. Cave Paintings from Lascaux, France<br />Dated 16,000 yrs old<br />
  10. 10.
  11. 11.
  12. 12. Female Figure (“Venus of Willendorf’)c. 23,000 BCE found near AustriaLimestone, height 4 ⅜”<br />
  13. 13. Stonehenge c. 2000-1500 BCESalisbury Plain, EnglandHeight of stones 13’6”, weight up to 50 tons each<br />
  14. 14.
  15. 15. Carhenge, Jim Reinders, 1987vintage American cars near Alliance, Nebraska<br />
  16. 16.
  17. 17. Eggshell pottery, c. 2000 BCELongshan culture, China<br />
  18. 18. The Origins of Art<br />To construct meaningful images and forms<br />Magic, Spirituality, Ceremony, Ritual<br />Record history<br />To create order and structure<br />A desire to make sense of the world<br />The urge to paint and pile rocks<br />To explore aesthetic possibilities<br />The desire to make something beautiful<br />
  19. 19.
  20. 20.
  21. 21.
  22. 22. Maya Lin, Wave field<br />
  23. 23. Frank GehryGuggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain<br />
  24. 24. Gehry Tower in Hanover, germany<br />
  25. 25. THE ROLE OF THE ARTIST<br />The artist records and commemorates: historical reference, captures a moment<br />The artist creates places for some human purpose: ritual, remembrance, bringing the community together<br />The artist gives tangible form to the unknown: things we don’t see… to the unknown, to the unseen, to the future<br />The artist gives feelings and ideas tangible form: using their own perspective and the viewer’s response<br />The artist offers an innovative way of seeing: a visual way to compare and contrast differing perspectives<br />The artist creates extraordinary versions of ordinary objects: exploring aesthetics of the material, makes a functional item into a nonfunctional artwork<br />
  26. 26. Records and commemorates<br />
  27. 27. Creates places for some human purpose<br />
  28. 28. Gives tangible form to the unknown<br />
  29. 29. Offers an innovative way of seeing<br />
  30. 30. Creates extraordinary versions of ordinary objects<br />Dieter's Spoon<br />by Sarah Doremus<br />
  31. 31.
  32. 32. Van Gogh<br />
  33. 33. Monet<br />
  34. 34.
  35. 35. Monet, Water Lilies close-up<br />
  36. 36. Vanitas<br />
  37. 37. Terms to know:<br />Aesthetics – branch of philosophy concerned with feelings aroused in us by sensory experiences such as seeing and hearing (your particular taste, what appeals to you)<br />Artist Intent – the decision to use certain artistic devices to create a specific look, feeling or content<br />Perception - The process of becoming aware through sight, sound, taste, smell, or touch; detection<br />
  38. 38. The romantic definition of art:<br />Art is created in search of an ultimate truth, an ultimate perfection, an ultimate confrontation with the self and the art.<br />True fine art has the primary motive of artist expression & the secondary motive of money.<br />Art has 2 intentions:<br />Satisfying the artist<br />Satisfying the patron<br />
  39. 39. My personal definition of ART:<br />The “art world” tells us what art is.<br />In other words: if a piece is displayed in a gallery or an image of it is published in a magazine or if it is critiqued by professionals, it is art.<br />
  40. 40. Verrocchio<br />
  41. 41. Patronage<br />Popes<br />The Medici family<br />Dorothy and <br /> Herbert Vogel<br />
  42. 42. The Gallery of Cornelis van derGeest, Willem van Haecht, 1628. A private picture gallery as an early precursor of the modern museum.<br />
  43. 43. Rodin studio<br />
  44. 44. Camille<br />
  45. 45. The Thinker, Auguste Rodin, 1902<br />
  46. 46. Tales of Hamza<br />
  47. 47. Dale Chihuly<br />
  48. 48. James Hampton<br />
  49. 49. Gayleen Aiken<br />
  50. 50.
  51. 51.
  52. 52. Blurring the lines between high brow and low brow art:<br />High art<br />Painting<br />Sculpture<br />Fine photography<br />Low art<br />Pottery<br />Comic books<br />Advertisements<br />
  53. 53. Dada movement – peak 1916-22an avante-garde art movement<br />
  54. 54. avant-garde<br />Artists and their work which stand in the forefront of a movement or of new ideas, often in opposition to established ideas and traditions; art that's ahead of its time, innovative, experimental. <br />
  55. 55. Marcel Duchamp<br />The Fountain, 1917<br />He is considered part of the Dada movement.<br />Duchamp changed art for the 20th century.<br />
  56. 56. From Prinzhorn’s book: Artistry of the Mentally Ill<br />
  57. 57. Salvador Dali<br />
  58. 58. Russian Surrealism<br />
  59. 59. Degenerate Art Exhibition<br />
  60. 60. Worhol<br />
  61. 61. Lichtenstein<br />
  62. 62. David Huang<br />
  63. 63.
  64. 64. Georgia O’Keefe<br />
  65. 65. La Pietà, Michelangelo, 1499<br />
  66. 66. Universal qualities of beauty<br />Symmetry<br />Simple geometrical shapes<br />Pure color<br />Repetition of line or shape<br />Fine craftsmanship<br />
  67. 67. Francisco de Goya<br />Chronos Devouring One of His Children<br />1820<br />
  68. 68. Pablo Picasso<br />First Communion, 1895<br />15 yrs old<br />
  69. 69. Pablo Picasso<br />Seated Woman Holding a Fan <br />1908<br />
  70. 70.
  71. 71. The Birth of Venus, Sandro Botticelli, 1486<br />
  72. 72. William Harnett<br />The Old Violin 1886<br />
  73. 73. Pablo Picasso<br />Seated Woman Holding a Fan <br />1908<br />
  74. 74. Lavender Mist, Jackson Pollock, 1950<br />
  75. 75. Alfred Stieglitz - photography<br />
  76. 76. Three Major Styles of Art:<br />Representational<br />Naturalistic<br />TrompeL’oeil<br />Abstract<br />Cubism<br />Stylized<br />Nonrepresentational<br />Patterns<br />Shapes<br />Colors<br />
  77. 77. ÉdouardManetLuncheon on the Grass , 1863<br />
  78. 78. Pere Borrell del Caso<br />Escaping Criticism<br /> 1874<br />
  79. 79. Still life, Pompeii, c. 70 AD<br />
  80. 80. Man on a Bench, Duane Hanson,1997vinyl, polychromed in oil, with accessories<br />
  81. 81. Marilyn Levine <br />Ceramic Leather Jacket <br />Life Size <br />
  82. 82. David Furman<br />
  83. 83. David Furman<br />
  84. 84.
  85. 85. The Actor<br />Pablo Picasso<br />1905<br />Rose Period<br />
  86. 86. Paul Cézanne<br />
  87. 87. Pablo Picasso<br />Les Demoiselles d'Avignon<br />1907<br />
  88. 88. Georges Braque<br />Violin and Candlestick<br />1910<br />
  89. 89.
  90. 90.
  91. 91.
  92. 92.
  93. 93.
  94. 94.
  95. 95. Wassily Kandinsky<br />On White 2<br />1923<br />
  96. 96. Kazimir Malevich, Black Square, c. 1915<br />
  97. 97. Cataract 3, Bridget Riley, 1967<br />
  98. 98. Where, Morris Louis, 1960<br />
  99. 99.
  100. 100. Pablo Picasso<br />Seated Woman Holding a Fan <br />1908<br />
  101. 101. STYLE<br />Characteristics that we recognize as constant, recurring or coherent to an individual artist’s work.<br />Pieces will have traits in common<br />Drawing style<br />Brush stroke<br />color<br />
  102. 102.
  103. 103.
  104. 104.
  105. 105.
  106. 106.
  107. 107.
  108. 108.
  109. 109.
  110. 110.
  111. 111.
  112. 112.
  113. 113.
  114. 114.
  115. 115. General styles<br />Constructed after the fact as scholars discern broad trends<br />Cultural – Atzec, Egyptian<br />Period – Gothic, Victorian<br />School styles – Impressionism, cubism<br />
  116. 116.
  117. 117.
  118. 118.
  119. 119.
  120. 120.
  121. 121. The textbook’s definition of art:<br />“embodied meaning”<br />Art is always about something<br />
  122. 122. The romantic definition of art:<br />Art is created in search of an ultimate truth, an ultimate perfection, an ultimate confrontation with the self and the art.<br />True fine art has the primary motive of artist expression & the secondary motive of money.<br />Art has 2 intentions:<br />Satisfying the artist<br />Satisfying the patron<br />
  123. 123. My personal definition of ART:<br />The “art world” tells us what art is.<br />In other words: if a piece is displayed in a gallery or an image of it is published in a magazine or if it is critiqued by professionals, it is art.<br />
  124. 124. 4 key terms related to meaning:<br />Form<br />Content<br />Iconography<br />Context<br />
  125. 125. Art & Meaning<br />FORM – the way art looks; size, shape, materials, color, composition<br />CONTENT – what the art is about; subject matter<br />The interaction between form and content help us determine meaning<br />
  126. 126. Music lesson, Matisse, 1917<br />Piano Lesson, Mattise, 1916<br />
  127. 127. iconography<br />The identification, description & interpretation of subject matter in art<br />Relates to the culture of the time<br />To understand iconography of the past, we often have to do research<br />
  128. 128. Shiva Statue in Bangalore, India<br />
  129. 129.
  130. 130. Arnolfini Double PortraitJan van Eyck, 1434<br />
  131. 131.
  132. 132. CONTEXT<br />Web of connections to the larger world of human culture<br />Relates to time & place<br />Personal and/or social circumstances<br />Why was the work made?<br />Who sees the work?<br />ALSO, the physical setting that the work is meant to be seen in<br />
  133. 133. Pablo Picasso<br />Seated Woman Holding a Fan <br />1908<br />
  134. 134.
  135. 135.
  136. 136.
  137. 137.
  138. 138.
  139. 139. 4 key terms related to meaning:<br />Form<br />Content<br />Iconography<br />Context<br />
  140. 140.
  141. 141.
  142. 142. The Gallery of Cornelis van derGeest, Willem van Haecht, 1628. A private picture gallery as an early precursor of the modern museum.<br />
  143. 143. Jenny Holzer, "Truisms“ 1977–79<br />
  144. 144. Barbara Kruger<br />
  145. 145. Richard Serra, Tilted Arc<br />
  146. 146.
  147. 147. Born in the Streets exhibition, Paris<br />
  148. 148.
  149. 149.
  150. 150.
  151. 151. http://gprime.net/images/sidewalkchalkguy/<br />
  152. 152. Non-object Art <br />Installation art<br />Conceptual art<br />Performance Art<br />
  153. 153.
  154. 154. Rachel WhitreadEmbankmentat Tate Modern<br />
  155. 155. Jenny Holzer<br />
  156. 156. jenny holzer<br />
  157. 157. Jenny Holzer<br />
  158. 158. Felix Gonzalez-Torres, 1995<br />
  159. 159. Themes of Art<br />Craft / Decor<br />Sacred Realm / Religion<br />Politics / Propaganda<br />Social Order<br />Storytelling / History<br />Genre Art – images of daily life<br />Human Experience / Self-Expression<br />Invention & Fantasy<br />Art & Nature / Landscape<br />Art about Art<br />
  160. 160. Beaded Pomo Basket Bowl<br />
  161. 161. Mata Ortiz pottery jar,Jorge Quintana, 2002<br />
  162. 162. Dale Chihuly<br />30-foot blown-glass chandelier in the Victoria and Albert Museum in 2000.<br />
  163. 163. Women of Gee's Bend, Alabama, quilting, 2005<br />
  164. 164. Roman Stripes by Deborah Pettway Young, circa 1963.<br />
  165. 165. Drunkard´s Path -- Variation (Snowball) by Lucy T. Pettway, circa 1950<br />
  166. 166. Ru Ware Bowl Stand, Chinese, Early 12th Century<br />
  167. 167.
  168. 168.
  169. 169. iconoclasm<br />Iconoclasm means “image breaking”<br /> Began in the Byzantium Empire<br />Early Christians debated the use of images<br />Idol worship<br />Arose again after Henry VIII broke from Rome<br />The protestants claimed the Catholics practiced idolatry, they destroyed many Catholic churches and art across Britain<br />Taliban – Islamic fundamentalism<br />
  170. 170. Byzantine Iconoclasm, Chludov Psalter, 9th century.<br />
  171. 171. The Sons of Liberty pulling down the statue of King George III on Bowling Green (New York City), 1776.<br />
  172. 172. The April 2003 toppling of Saddam Hussein’s statue <br />
  173. 173. Buddhas of Bamyan6th century, Afghanistan<br />
  174. 174. 2001<br />
  175. 175. Delacroix, Liberty Leading the People, 1830<br />
  176. 176. Guernica, Picasso, 1937<br />
  177. 177. Propaganda<br />Propaganda is a form of communication aimed at influencing the attitude of a community toward some cause or position. As opposed to impartially providing information, propaganda in its most basic sense, presents information primarily to influence an audience. <br />Propaganda often presents facts selectively (thus possibly lying by omission) to encourage a particular synthesis, or uses loaded messages to produce an emotional rather than rational response to the information presented. <br />The desired result is a change of the attitude toward the subject in the target audience to further a political agenda.<br />
  178. 178. 1876<br />
  179. 179. 1947 comic book<br />
  180. 180. 1917<br />
  181. 181. 1914<br />
  182. 182.
  183. 183.
  184. 184.
  185. 185. John Brown going to his Hanging, Horace Pippen, 1942 (the actual event happened in 1859)<br />
  186. 186.
  187. 187. 1941<br />
  188. 188.
  189. 189.
  190. 190. Dorothea Lang, Migrant Mother, 1936<br />
  191. 191. Mary Cassatt, The Child’s Bath, 1893<br />
  192. 192.
  193. 193.
  194. 194.
  195. 195. Kathe Kollwitz, Woman with Dead Child, 1903 etching<br />
  196. 196.
  197. 197. The Hungry Lion Throws Itself on the Antelope, Rousseau, 1905<br />
  198. 198. The Snake Charmer, 1907<br />
  199. 199.
  200. 200. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Garden_of_Earthly_Delights<br />
  201. 201. Revenge of the goldfish, 1981, sandy skoglund<br />
  202. 202. Germs are everywhere, 1984<br />
  203. 203. The Tetons and the Snake River, Ansel Adams, 1942<br />
  204. 204. Evening, McDonald Lake, Glacier National Park (1942)<br />
  205. 205. Great Wave off KanagawaHokusai<br />
  206. 206. Red Fuji from Hokusai's series, Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji.<br />
  207. 207.
  208. 208.
  209. 209. Mattise, L'Atelier Rouge, (The Red Studio), 1911<br />
  210. 210.
  211. 211. Themes of Art<br />Craft / Decor<br />Sacred Realm / Religion<br />Politics / Propaganda<br />Social Order<br />Storytelling / History<br />Genre Art – images of daily life<br />Human Experience / Self-Expression<br />Invention & Fantasy<br />Art & Nature / Landscape<br />Art about Art<br />
  212. 212. End of Ch 1-3<br />
  213. 213. Grading Criteria - Presentations<br />Proper length = 5 minutes<br />Full bio/history<br />Pic of artist<br />Where did they go to school<br />Influences/legacy<br />Anecdotal info<br />Plenty of images<br />Presenters interest in the subject<br />Seems informed/able to answer questions<br />Proper sources cited<br />

×