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HDR Seminar: Publishing in theHumanities and Social SciencesProf. Andy Bennett (a.bennett@griffith.edu.au)Brady Robards (b...
Who are you?• Name• Program    – Your ‘tribe’ or discipline• Do you have any publications ‘in the bag’? Any ‘in the pipes’...
Overview• Part I: Publishing from your thesis (Andy)• Part II: Publishing with your supervisor (Brady)• Part III: Publishi...
Part I: Publishing from your thesis• Why publish?  – Griffith’s (newly revised) expectations.  – From HDR student to ECR p...
Where to publish?• Tips on targeting journals with…   – Alignment to academic discipline of researcher   – Prestige within...
How to publish from your thesis• Think strategically, e.g. articles shouldn’t just  be a chunk from the thesis but need to...
Outcomes• Useful to think about generating 2 – 3 (or  more) papers from thesis.• Should you turn your thesis into a book? ...
Part II: Publishing with your supervisor• Establishing the basis for  collaboration:   – Finding common ground. This can  ...
Establishing parameters• Who writes what, how much, and how will this reflect  in the name order of authors on the publica...
Managing the process• Who will deal with the administrative back-and-  forward with the journal?• Draw on the experience o...
A slight detour…Technologies of distribution and tracking
Part III: Publishing alone with guidance           from your supervisor• Taking ownership of and responsibility for your w...
Taking ownership of and responsibility    for your own work and career• Learning trajectories of writing to publish• Super...
When and where to publish: supervisors’ adviceand the politics of scholarly journal positioning• Thinking about publishing...
Negotiating your responsibilities and the obligations ofsupervisors in the article writing and revisions process• Writing ...
Understanding reviewers’ comments: playing the ‘game’ of peer-reviewed journal publishing• The reality of the peer-review ...
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Publishing during PhD candidature

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A Griffith Graduate Research School (GGRS) seminar on publishing during doctoral candidature for students in the Humanities and Social Sciences

Published in: Education, Technology
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Publishing during PhD candidature

  1. 1. HDR Seminar: Publishing in theHumanities and Social SciencesProf. Andy Bennett (a.bennett@griffith.edu.au)Brady Robards (b.robards@griffith.edu.au)Chris Driver (christopher.driver@gmail.com)
  2. 2. Who are you?• Name• Program – Your ‘tribe’ or discipline• Do you have any publications ‘in the bag’? Any ‘in the pipes’? How confident are you with peer-reviewed academic publishing right now? On a scale of 1 to 5… 1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5(Not confident at all) (Very confident)
  3. 3. Overview• Part I: Publishing from your thesis (Andy)• Part II: Publishing with your supervisor (Brady)• Part III: Publishing alone with guidance from your supervisor (Chris)• Part IV: Q&A and discussion
  4. 4. Part I: Publishing from your thesis• Why publish? – Griffith’s (newly revised) expectations. – From HDR student to ECR post-doc or ECR lecturer in the contemporary academic environment. “Higher degree research students are required to publish during candidature as a means of disseminating their findings and developing their writing skills… must be peer reviewed…”
  5. 5. Where to publish?• Tips on targeting journals with… – Alignment to academic discipline of researcher – Prestige within the specific field of the researcher – Good citation rate
  6. 6. How to publish from your thesis• Think strategically, e.g. articles shouldn’t just be a chunk from the thesis but need to be crafted into self-contained papers.• Consider your audience(s). – Who reads the journal you are targeting? – Is it a special issue? – Is it a book chapter in an edited collection?
  7. 7. Outcomes• Useful to think about generating 2 – 3 (or more) papers from thesis.• Should you turn your thesis into a book? What might that book look like compared to the thesis? – Targeting publishers• What is the state of the academic monograph today?
  8. 8. Part II: Publishing with your supervisor• Establishing the basis for collaboration: – Finding common ground. This can be a different process for a co- author relationship than it is for a supervisor-student partnership. – Trialling the paper at an earlier stage at a conference. – Drawing out the original material from student’s research that builds on and develops research by the supervisor.
  9. 9. Establishing parameters• Who writes what, how much, and how will this reflect in the name order of authors on the publication?• Deciding on the language and framing of that research, e.g. was it a research team throughout or has the supervisor only been directly involved in the analysis?• Agreeing on a timeframe for development and submission, and revising that timetable or future avenues of publication depending on the journal’s initial response.
  10. 10. Managing the process• Who will deal with the administrative back-and- forward with the journal?• Draw on the experience of the supervisor to deal with criticism. Learn (through your supervisor) how and when to stand your ground with reviewer feedback.• Develop an effective dialogue with journal editors where possible (this can be a networking exercise).
  11. 11. A slight detour…Technologies of distribution and tracking
  12. 12. Part III: Publishing alone with guidance from your supervisor• Taking ownership of and responsibility for your work• When and where to publish: supervisors’ advice and the politics of scholarly journal positioning• Negotiating your responsibilities and the obligations of supervisors in the article writing and revisions process• Understanding reviewers’ comments: playing the ‘game’ of peer-reviewed journal publishing
  13. 13. Taking ownership of and responsibility for your own work and career• Learning trajectories of writing to publish• Supervisors’ are resources, not HR specialists• Do your research: get across the predominant journals in your field and be able to discuss them• Helpful to think about publishing as narrative practice: what do I want to communicate here?
  14. 14. When and where to publish: supervisors’ adviceand the politics of scholarly journal positioning• Thinking about publishing as a way of building a research profile and an academic identity• Getting a feeling for journals in the field: thinking about the fit of your work and the political outcomes• What do you want out of the PhD? What kinds of doors to you want to open with publishing?• Seeking and critically evaluating supervisors’ advice and ‘destination’ recommendations
  15. 15. Negotiating your responsibilities and the obligations ofsupervisors in the article writing and revisions process• Writing for publication is hard and represents a huge investment of time from you and your supervisor/s• Getting your responsibilities and expectations out in the open: surprises cause awkwardness• Things you should be doing to lessen the burden of supervision and get real feedback on article revisions• Supervisor; not God. Being critical about your own work and others’ opinion of your work
  16. 16. Understanding reviewers’ comments: playing the ‘game’ of peer-reviewed journal publishing• The reality of the peer-review process: being realistic about feedback• Coping with rejection and playing the ‘game’ of publishing• Timely revisions DO matter – there is no obligation on reviewers to accept revised papers and this can cause you problems

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