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Practical Ontology: Collaborating and Communicating with Concept Maps

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Seema Rao, Cleveland Museum of Art, USA, Patty Edmonson, Cleveland Museum of Art, USA, Brad Baer, Bluecadet, USA, Ashley Weinard, Eduseum Consulting, USA

Concept mapping is a technique rooted in the constructivist theory that learning is an active process that happens through the interaction of experience and new ideas. In the how-to session associated with this paper, attendees learn how to create concept maps as a tool for effective communication in museums both internally and with visitors. Presenters share three examples of how they used concept mapping in the development of digital projects, collaboratively create a concept map to demonstrate process and benefit, and lead a concept mapping session.

Objectives of the session include that participants learn how to create and facilitate a collective concept-mapping experience. Participants reflect collectively on the value and application of concept mapping as a way to see a familiar idea “sideways,” from new perspectives and depths; visualize thinking; identify common ground across collaborators; and collect, organize, and share ideas. Participants also brainstorm and explore possible internal/external applications.

Bibliography:
Falk, J. H., T. Moussouri, and D. Coulson. “The Effect of Visitors’ Agendas on Museum Learning.” Curator: The Museum Journal 41:2 (1998): 107 - 120. http://www.depts.ttu.edu/museumttu/CFASWebsite/5333/Supplemental%20Readings%202011/Falk_The%20Effect%20of%20Visitor's%20Agendas.pdf

Maldonado, Roberto Martinez, Judy Kay, and Kalina Yacef. “Analysing Knowledge Generation and Acquisition from Individual and Face-to-Face Collaborative Concept Mapping.” From Concept Maps: Theory, Methodology, Technology. Proc. of the Fifth Int. Conference on Concept Mapping, Valletta, Malta 2012. http://cmc.ihmc.us/cmc2012papers/cmc2012-p45.pdf

Novak, J. D. & A. J. Cañas. “The Theory Underlying Concept Maps and How to Construct Them, Technical Report IHMC CmapTools 2006-01 Rev 01-2008.” Florida Institute for Human and Machine Cognition, 2008. http://cmap.ihmc.us/Publications/ResearchPapers/TheoryUnderlyingConceptMaps.pdf.

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Practical Ontology: Collaborating and Communicating with Concept Maps

  1. 1. Practical Ontology: Collaborating and Communicating with Concept Maps Seema Rao, Director, Intergenerational Learning, @artlust Patty Edmonson, Intergenerational Interpretation Specialist, @retrograde_d Ashley Weinard, Principal, Eduseum Consulting, @eduseum Brad Baer, Creative Director, Environments, Bluecadet, @bluecadet #MWMapping
  2. 2. The Schedule 9:00-9:10 Explanation 9:10-9:15 Reflection No.1 9:15-9:20 Revisions & Additions 9:20-9:25 Creating a Concept Map 9:25-9:35 Reflection No. 2 9:35-9:50 Closing
  3. 3. What does the word engagement bring to mind?
  4. 4. Audience Engagement
  5. 5. artnc.org
  6. 6. Concept Explorer 1.0 artnc.org
  7. 7. Concept Explorer 2.0 artnc.org
  8. 8. Planning with External Constituents
  9. 9. Co-planning events with Teens
  10. 10. Planning Interactives
  11. 11. The museum collection On a foundation of research What did we map?
  12. 12. Post-its into Post-it App Actual Map1 2 Trim out Post-in notes3 Turn it into a concept map4 The Process
  13. 13. Travel  of   Ideas  and   Technology Discover the context of travel Consider how ideas and beliefs travel and influence artworks Mother  and  child,   Nevers,  still  life Globalization Desire  and   Fashion Explore how these artists use imitation to market their works (in this case porcelain) Explore how exotic, imported works of art are transformed and showcased in the west Depicting   the   unknown Explore how artists depict places and people they have not seen Concepts Related Activities Coconut  Cup,  mounted   porcelain  ,  and  still  life Nevers  and   Delft Ship  painting,   compass,  Namban Namban,  Delft,   and  Coconut  cup     Comparisons How do artists imagine unknown places? How do ideas travel around the globe? Why were these objects desired?
  14. 14. Why do artworks travel?/Why does desire fuel trade?/Why do people want these? Where  are  these   from? Click  on  each   Artwork  for   more How  do  ideas  travel   around  the  globe? Why  were  these   fashionable? Transmission  of   motifs Faith Compare  the  Van  Leeuwen,  Delft   plate,  Coconut  Cup,  Namban,   Nevers  ,  Chelsea  porcelain   See  Outline  for  specific     details  for  each  artwork Interactives/  or   Dilemmas Tour Key Compare  the  Coconut  cup,  the   mount  porcelain,  Van  der   Weyden,  Nevers   Compare  the  Namban,  the  Christian   Porcelain,  the  Nevers  and  the  Delft Tour Porcelain  and   desire Tour Where   are  they   from? How  did  artworks   travel? Trade,  navigation,   and  optics Map  it! Depicting   Foreigners Curios  and   Oddities Why   would  a   museum   collect  a   compass? Use   it! How   was  this   made?
  15. 15. YOU’VE COLLABORATIVELY MAPPED OUT YOUR EXPERIENCE Now what ?
  16. 16. The BLUECADET Project Roadmapping Process Museums and the Web / Friday, April 10, 2015
  17. 17. Designer Developer Project ManagerContent Strategist Producer
  18. 18. B L U E C A D E T Project Roadmapping Process 1. Project Discovery 2. Project Scope 3. Project Estimating
  19. 19. Phase ONE Project Discovery
  20. 20. O U R P R O C E S S Project Discovery / Context 1. Project Context Project Context • Timeline • Budget • Stakeholders • Content • etc.
  21. 21. O U R P R O C E S S Project Discovery / Context 1. Project Context 2. Project Goals Project Goals • Increase visitors • More engagement • Longer dwell-time • More social sharing • etc.
  22. 22. O U R P R O C E S S Project Discovery / Context 1. Project Context 2. Project Goals 3. Criteria for Success Criteria for Success • >25% more visitors • Media coverage • Better surveys • Better RFP • etc.
  23. 23. O U R P R O C E S S Project Discovery / Context 1. Project Context 2. Project Goals 3. Criteria for Success 4. Doneness Doneness • Ready for fabrication • Scope of work • 5 schemes • Board approval • etc.
  24. 24. O U R P R O C E S S Project Discovery / Context 1. Project Context 2. Project Goals 3. Criteria for Success 4. Doneness 5. Risks Risks • Failure to procure content • Lack of board consensus • Lack of funding • Too short of a timeline • etc.
  25. 25. O U R P R O C E S S Project Discovery / Context 1. Project Context 2. Project Goals 3. Criteria for Success 4. Doneness 5. Risks 6. Open Issues Open Issues • Rights acquisition • Team availability • Stakeholders • Space availability • etc.
  26. 26. O U R P R O C E S S Project Discovery / Context 1. Project Context 2. Project Goals 3. Criteria for Success 4. Doneness 5. Risks 6. Open Issues 7. Innovation Innovation • iBeacons • Social media • Personalization • Touchwall • etc.
  27. 27. O U R P R O C E S S Project Discovery / Context 1. Project Context 2. Project Goals 3. Criteria for Success 4. Doneness 5. Risks 6. Open Issues 7. Innovation 8. Platform / Approach Platform / Approach • Touchwall • Mobile App • CMS • Prog. Enhancements • etc.
  28. 28. Phase TWO Project Scope
  29. 29. O U R P R O C E S S Project Scope • Epic - Large Goal / Concept • Story - Specific Detail • Use-case - What is required • Open issues - Risks E P I C S T O R Y U S E - C A S E Project Name O P E N I S S U E S
  30. 30. O U R P R O C E S S Project Scope - Example E N G AG E M E N T Q U E S T I O N S M U LT I P L E C H O I C E Location-based Mobile App S H A R I N G C U S T O M B A D G E S I N C L U D E S C O R I N G E M A I L A B L E
  31. 31. O U R P R O C E S S Project Scope - Example E N G AG E M E N T Q U E S T I O N S M U LT I P L E C H O I C E Location-based Mobile App S H A R I N G C U S T O M B A D G E S I N C L U D E S C O R I N G E M A I L A B L E I N T E R N E T ?
  32. 32. O U R P R O C E S S Project Scope - Example E N G AG E M E N T Q U E S T I O N S M U LT I P L E C H O I C E Location-based Mobile App S H A R I N G C U S T O M B A D G E S I N C L U D E S C O R I N G E M A I L A B L E E N G AG E M E N T Q U E S T I O N S M U LT I P L E C H O I C E Location-based Mobile S H A R C U S T B A D G I N C L U D E S C O R I N G E M A I L I N T E R Platform / Approach • Timeline • Budget • Stakeholders • Content • etc.
  33. 33. O U R P R O C E S S Documenting
  34. 34. Phase THREE Project Estimating
  35. 35. O U R P R O C E S S Workload Estimating E N G AG E M E N T Q U E S T I O N S M U LT I P L E C H O I C E Location-based Mobile App S H A R I N G C U S T O M B A D G E S I N C L U D E S C O R I N G E M A I L A B L E E D U C AT I O N D E S I G N C U R AT O R S D E V E L O P E R S M A R K E T I N G 1 0 2 0 5 1 5 4 E D U C AT I O N D E S I G N C U R AT O R S D E V E L O P E R S M A R K E T I N G 8 1 4 1 0 6 2 E D U C AT I O N D E S I G N C U R AT O R S D E V E L O P E R S M A R K E T I N G 1 0 H O U R S 2 0 H O U R S 0 5 H O U R S 1 5 H O U R S 0 4 H O U R S multiple by hours or dollars. If it’s more than you have, you need to start making cuts….
  36. 36. O U R P R O C E S S Budget-line / Time-line Q U E S T I O N S M U LT I P L E C H O I C E S H A R I N G C U S T O M B A D G E S I N C L U D E S C O R I N G E M A I L A B L E E D U C AT I O N D E S I G N C U R AT O R S D E V E L O P E R S M A R K E T I N G 1 0 2 0 5 1 5 4 E D U C AT I O N D E S I G N C U R AT O R S D E V E L O P E R S M A R K E T I N G 8 1 4 1 0 6 2 T I M E - S P E C I F I C C U S T O M AVATA R S B U D G E T / T I M E L I N E
  37. 37. O U R P R O C E S S Budget-line / Time-line Q U E S T I O N S M U LT I P L E C H O I C E S H A R I N G C U S T O M B A D G E S I N C L U D E S C O R I N G E M A I L A B L E E D U C AT I O N D E S I G N C U R AT O R S D E V E L O P E R S M A R K E T I N G 1 0 2 0 5 1 5 4 E D U C AT I O N D E S I G N C U R AT O R S D E V E L O P E R S M A R K E T I N G 8 1 4 1 0 6 2 C U S T O M AVATA R S B U D G E T / T I M E L I N E M O R E M O N E Y - O R - 
 M O R E R E S O U R C E S T I M E - S P E C I F I C
  38. 38. PRODUCTS PROCESS=
  39. 39. PRODUCTS PROCESS=What you’re delivering What it takes to deliver
  40. 40. 1. Addresses miscommunication 2. Builds consensus (internal & external) 3. Manages expectations, budgets, & timeline B L U E C A D E T Project Roadmapping Benefits
  41. 41. 1. Addresses miscommunication 2. Builds consensus (internal & external) 3. Manages expectations, budgets, & timeline B L U E C A D E T Project Roadmapping Benefits
  42. 42. Thank You. Seema Rao, Director, Intergenerational Learning, @artlust Patty Edmonson, Intergenerational Interpretation Specialist, @retrograde_d Ashley Weinard, Principal, Eduseum Consulting, @eduseum Brad Baer, Creative Director, Environments, Bluecadet, @bluecadet #MWMapping
  43. 43. Thank You. Seema Rao, Director, Intergenerational Learning, @artlust Patty Edmonson, Intergenerational Interpretation Specialist, @retrograde_d Ashley Weinard, Principal, Eduseum Consulting, @eduseum Brad Baer, Creative Director, Environments, Bluecadet, @bluecadet #MWMapping

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