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Navitas Science November 10 & 12

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basic library instruction for International College of Manitoba students

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Navitas Science November 10 & 12

  1. 1. How to do research at the University of Manitoba Libraries<br />Betty Braaksma,<br />University of Manitoba Libraries<br />ICM class, November 10 & 12 2009<br />
  2. 2. Most courses require you to complete essays or assignments using library resources like:<br /><ul><li>books,
  3. 3. databases
  4. 4. scholarly articles.</li></li></ul><li>Assumptions<br />Many professors assume that you already have the skills that you need to complete your assignments.<br />
  5. 5. What Skills? Research + writing<br /><ul><li>Know how to use the library catalogue
  6. 6. Know how to locate books within the library system
  7. 7. Know how to find scholarly journals and articles
  8. 8. Know how to select appropriate information
  9. 9. Be effective in:
  10. 10. evaluating
  11. 11. interpreting
  12. 12. supporting
  13. 13. presenting</li></ul> the results of your research<br />
  14. 14. Survey results<br />Finding a book: <br /><ul><li>Library catalogue – 50%
  15. 15. Google – 50%</li></ul>Finding a scholarly article:<br /><ul><li>Google – 100%</li></ul>Identifying a scholarly article:<br /><ul><li>British Journal of Sports Medicine – 25%
  16. 16. Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine, http://www.ccnm.edu – 75%</li></li></ul><li>Example of an assignment:<br />Write a 500 word paper about current research on nanotechnology. You must use at least one book, one scholarly article and one reliable website, and cite them correctly in your bibliography<br />
  17. 17. 4 Research tasks<br />Find a book<br />Find a scholarly article<br />Find a reliable website<br />Record citation information for each item found<br />
  18. 18. What’s “scholarly”?<br />Scholarly publications(books, articles, etc.) are written by experts in a particular field of study, and are usually research-based. The primary audience is experts and students, and as a result the publications are typically much more sophisticated and advanced than articles found in more general sources.<br />Popular publications aim to inform readers about issues of common interest to the general public and are much more informal in tone and scope, and are written in simpler language.<br />Adapted from: http://www.library.ubc.ca/hss/instruction/scholpop.pdf<br />
  19. 19. http://lib.mnsu.edu/research/documents/scholarly.pdf<br />
  20. 20. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uDGJ2CYfY9A<br />
  21. 21. What about about Wikipedia?<br />It’s NOT a scholarly resource, BUT you can (maybe*)<br />“use Wikipedia to get you started, but don’t simply quote or lift information from it to use in your papers.” http://libweb1.lib.buffalo.edu/blog/students/?p=31<br />* With your prof’s consent<br />
  22. 22. 1. Find a Book<br />
  23. 23. Nanotechnology research<br />
  24. 24.
  25. 25.
  26. 26.
  27. 27. 2. Find a Scholarly/academic article<br />
  28. 28. How to find Scholarly Articles<br />If you know the topic – use the library databases OR Google Scholar<br />If you know the journal name – use the library catalogue (Bison)<br />If you have a citation – use Article Linker<br />
  29. 29. Finding the databases<br />
  30. 30. Selecting general databases<br />
  31. 31. Selecting Science databases<br />
  32. 32. Choosing a database<br />
  33. 33. Authenticate if necessary<br />
  34. 34. Searching for an article<br />
  35. 35. Selecting an article<br />
  36. 36. Displaying the article<br />
  37. 37.
  38. 38. searching google scholar<br />Nanotechnology research<br />
  39. 39. Selecting an article<br />
  40. 40. Get it @ uml<br />
  41. 41.
  42. 42. Using article linker<br />
  43. 43.
  44. 44. 3. Choose a reliable website<br />
  45. 45. What is “reliable”, “Suitable”, “approved”?<br />If you use websites for your research, they should have the same characteristics as scholarly articles.<br />
  46. 46.
  47. 47.
  48. 48.
  49. 49.
  50. 50.
  51. 51.
  52. 52. Web Evaluation “ABCs”<br />AUTHORITY<br />ACCURACY<br />AESTHETICS/DESIGN<br />adapted from: Six criteria for evaluating web pages,http://www.library.fullerton.edu/evalsites.htm<br />BIAS/PERSPECTIVE<br />CONTENT/RELEVANCE<br />CURRENCY<br />
  53. 53. Web Evaluation Rubric<br />
  54. 54. 4. Cite your sources in a bibliography<br />
  55. 55. What’s a Bibliography?<br />A bibliography is a list of all the sources you used when you did your research. <br />As you read and take notes, you should write down:<br /><ul><li>full title
  56. 56. author
  57. 57. place of publication
  58. 58. publisher
  59. 59. date of publication </li></ul>for each source that you use. <br />This applies to any source: book, article, website, photograph, video, etc.<br />This description of your source is called a citation<br />Adapted from: HOW TO WRITE A BIBLIOGRAPHY<br />by Rich Gubitosi, Nathan Straus Young Adult Library http://teenlink.nypl.org/bibliography.html<br />
  60. 60. Citation styles<br /><ul><li>Different professors may require you to use different citation styles for your bibliography. The common styles are APA and MLA.
  61. 61. APA examples: http://www.liu.edu/cwis/cwp/library/workshop/citapa.htm
  62. 62. MLA examples:
  63. 63. http://www.liu.edu/cwis/cwp/library/workshop/citmla.htm
  64. 64. Help at U of M:
  65. 65. Learning Assistance Centre: http://www.umanitoba.ca/u1/lac/</li></li></ul><li>Example of a bibliography<br />Baker, J. 1992. From Cold War to democratic peace. U.S. Department of State Dispatch, June 29.<br />Beattie, A. 2008. Necessity pushes out principles. Financial Times, October 14.<br />Bishop, M., and M. Green. 2008. Philanthrocapitalism: How the rich can save the world. New York: Bloomsbury.<br />Boyes, R. 2008. Every country for itself as European unity collapses in an attack of jitters. Times, October 6.<br />Bressand, A. 1983. Mastering the ‘World economy.’ Foreign Affairs, Spring.<br />Brown, G. 2008. Out of the ashes. Washington Post, October 17.<br />Bush, G. H.W. 1989. Press conference in response to Berlin Wall events, November 9. http://www.cnn.com/specials/cold.war/episodes/23/documents/bush/.<br />———. 1992. freedom Support Act, Office of the Press Secretary, April1. http://www.fas.org/spp/starwars/offdocs/b920401.htm.<br />Bush, G.W. 2001. Address to a joint session of Congress, September 20.<br />Campbell, K. 2007. Is Iran facing an economic crisis? USIPeace Briefing, May. http://www.usip.org/pubs/usipeace_briefings/2007/0510_iran_economic_crisis.html.<br />Casey, T. 2008. The USA Patriot Act: The decline of legitimacy in the age of terrorism. New York: Oxford University Press.<br />Castañeda, J. 2006. Latin America’s left turn. Foreign Affairs, May–June.<br />Quirk, James M.1Managing Global Transitions. International Research Journal. 2008, Vol. 6 Issue 4, p341-371, 31p<br />http://proxy2.lib.umanitoba.ca/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=37246146&site=ehost-live<br />
  66. 66. Why are bibliographies needed?<br />1. Courtesy: All knowledge builds on what has gone before, so you must give credit/respect/recognition to the scholars who preceded you.<br />2. Proof: You can point to the evidence you used to support your ideas. You know where to find information again, if needed. Your instructor/colleagues can find and assess the information you used.<br />3. Honesty: Plagiarism, whether intentional or not, is considered to be cheating. Academic dishonesty is a punishable offence at all universities.<br />
  67. 67. Questions?<br />
  68. 68.
  69. 69. Ask your librarian <br />Betty Braaksma<br />betty_braaksma@umanitoba.ca<br />

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