UC San Diego: How we communicate during a campus emergency

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Information about the process and methods used to communicate to the campus audience and beyond during a crisis or emergency.

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UC San Diego: How we communicate during a campus emergency

  1. 1. Get the word outCommunicating to the campus during an emergency
  2. 2. Brett Pollak@brettcpollak@campusweboffice#uccsc2012
  3. 3. AgendaOverview of emergency reporting structureClassifications of emergenciesCommunication mechanismsRecent case studyImprovements neededOpen discussion
  4. 4. What we plan for…
  5. 5. What it ends up being…
  6. 6. Plan for likely scenariosBasis for response based in IncidentCommand System (ICS)• Creates a synthetic organization in the time of crisis
  7. 7. Incident  Commander Information  Liaison Officer Officer Safety Officer Finance & Operations Planning Logistics Administration
  8. 8. Emergency Operations Center
  9. 9. Emergency TypesSeverity 1 (low)Severity 2 (medium)Severity 3 (high)
  10. 10. Severity 1 (low)Examples:• H1N1 Swine Flu,• Severe storms predicted or possible floodingCommunications may contain info for“preventative measures”
  11. 11. Severity 1 (low)Communication
  12. 12. Severity 1 (low)
  13. 13. Severity 1 (low)
  14. 14. Severity 1 (low)
  15. 15. Register for notifications
  16. 16. Register for notifications
  17. 17. Register for notifications
  18. 18. Other Communication ChannelsChannel 1610 (888) 308-8273
  19. 19. Severity 2 (medium)Examples:• Large magnitude earthquake• Fire approaching campus, etc.Some damage or affect to the campus (classesclosed) may be immediately evident or likely to beevident in the near future
  20. 20. Severity 2 (medium)
  21. 21. Severity 2 (medium/high)
  22. 22. Severity 2 (medium/high)
  23. 23. Severity 2 (medium/high)
  24. 24. Severity 2 (medium/high)
  25. 25. Code to get banner<script src= "http://ucsd.edu/common/_emergency‐broadcast/message.js" type="text/javascript"></script>  DRAFT
  26. 26. Severity 3 (high)Examples:• Active on-campus shooter• Large scale on-campus fire, or other high impact incidentCould potentially capture the attention of astate-wide, national, or international audience.
  27. 27. Severity 3 (high) TreatmentUCSD home page becomes the emergencystatus page – Ensures viewers do not miss info updates – Lightweight: optimized to handle increased Web traffic – ucsd.edu/emergency would point here
  28. 28. RedundancyExamples:• Power Failures in datacenter• Fire or earthquake disables datacenterBackup generatorCan run for ~4 hours before refueling
  29. 29. Disaster RecoveryCopy of CMS content & websitessent to UCOP each morning at5:00 AMLimited number of accountscreated (CMS not behind SSO)Utility created to switch DNS socontent under ucsd.edu is beingdelivered from UCOP Web serverenvironment.
  30. 30. Case studySept. 8, 2011• Power outage across Southern CA• Power outage duration: ~20 hoursSummary• Generators kicked in – No downtime• Cell towers became overloaded – Communication issues• Batteries needed to be charged via car chargers• Concerns about family safety balanced with campus safety
  31. 31. What we can do betterUtilize social mediaRock solid back channel for CommunicationsUtilizing crowdsourcing to report statusBetter ‘local’ communication channels

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