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Why trust is vital to success with Knowledge Management

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- The necessity of trust
- The impact of trust
- Evaluating trust
- Interpersonal and impersonal trust
- 5 key dimensions of trust
- Assessing and acting on trust evaluations

Published in: Leadership & Management
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Why trust is vital to success with Knowledge Management

  1. 1. Why trust is vital to success with Knowledge Management Stephen Bounds Director and PrincipalConsultant Trust me!
  2. 2. Overview • The necessity of trust • The impact of trust • Evaluating trust • Interpersonal and impersonal trust • 5 key dimensions of trust • Assessing and acting on trust evaluations
  3. 3. What does it mean to “know” something?
  4. 4. AKI Model Information mediates our experiences Actions alter our environment Knowledge drives decisions & actions Concept credit: DavidWilliams
  5. 5. Every moment of every day, we rely upon the experiences of others, both past and present
  6. 6. Why?
  7. 7. What does it mean to have trust?
  8. 8. Trust is … A psychological state [to accept] vulnerability based upon positive expectations of the intentions or behaviour of another. - MikaVanhala
  9. 9. AKI Model Information mediates our experiences Actions alter our environment Knowledge drives decisions & actions Concept credit: DavidWilliams
  10. 10. System boundaries Knowledgeinformation information
  11. 11. System boundaries
  12. 12. System boundaries
  13. 13. What’s the difference? Knowledge
  14. 14. Trust is not an either/or but a graded scale
  15. 15. AKI Model Pushed information Pulled information Confident action Cautious action Accepted knowledge Contingent knowledge Concept credit: DavidWilliams
  16. 16. Organisational knowledge is how ‘right’ decisions and actions are determined
  17. 17. Lack of trust has a direct and significant impact on efficiency of knowledge use
  18. 18. Consequences •Won’t seek out information from colleagues •Won’t trust decisions made by others, ie lack of trust in their knowledge •More cautious when acting on knowledge
  19. 19. Exercise 1: Consider the organisation you work for • How much does your work group trust other groups in your organisation? • When would you hesitate or refuse to accept the decisions of others? • Do you find that others are reluctant to accept your knowledge about a process or situation? • Do you have a process for reconciling knowledge conflicts?
  20. 20. How do we decide who to trust?
  21. 21. Interpersonal trust Impersonal trust
  22. 22. Interpersonal trust • People performing in a way that meets others’ expectations • People signalling their intention to continue meeting those expectations • Lateral trust =Trust relations among peers or equals • Vertical trust =Trust relations between employees and their superiors
  23. 23. Dimensions of interpersonal trust • Competence trust  A person will solve problems and deliver desired outcomes because of their skills, abilities, and characteristics • Benevolence trust  A person has good intentions and will demonstrate concern for the welfare of others • Reliability trust  A person will perform actions that match their words, in line with acceptable principles and values
  24. 24. Impersonal trust • A result of roles, systems and reputation • The individual employee’s expectation about the employer organization’s capability and fairness
  25. 25. Dimensions of impersonal trust • Leadership trust  An organisation’s vision and strategy, as well as corporate processes, roles and practices will lead to good/fair outcomes • Structural trust  An organisation’s roles, rules, structures, and relationships are operating properly, normally, and reliably
  26. 26. The assessments we make individually and collectively about trust are subjective
  27. 27. Does that matter?
  28. 28. Exercise 2: Inter-group trust relationships • Identify two groups that regularly interact • These can be wholly within your organisation, a mix of internal/external, or completely separate • How would you rate the trust relationship between these groups for one chosen dimension? (Both ways – trust can and often is asymmetrical) • Discuss – repeat for other dimensions if you wish.
  29. 29. TrustRadar Benevolence Competence StructuralLeadership Reliability Concept credit: MikaVanhala
  30. 30. TrustRadar Benevolence Competence StructuralLeadership Reliability Interpersonal trust Impersonal trust Concept credit: MikaVanhala
  31. 31. Exercise 3: UsingTrustRadar • SeeTrustRadar handout for your questionnaire • Assess your own group, then another group from yours which you frequently interact with • Which trust scores were high? Which were low? • Any surprises?Why?
  32. 32. Discussion: Acting on trust • How can you act to address identified trust issues? • Are different strategies required for each dimension? • Comments about the usefulness of this approach?
  33. 33. Thank you!

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