Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

B bounabat-datamatix final version

209 views

Published on

Government Systems Interoperability

Published in: Technology
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

B bounabat-datamatix final version

  1. 1. e-Government Services Interoperability: Benchmark and Key Success Factors Pr. Bouchaïb BOUNABAT Professor at ENSIAS, Rabat, Morocco Expert in National ICT Strategies and e-Government May 23-27, 2009 – Dubaï, UAE
  2. 2. Outline • Interoperability of eGovernment services • Interoperability Governance • General Interoperability Framework • Architecture oriented approach 2B. Bounabat. e-Government Services Interoperability. 15th GCC eGovernment and eServices Forum May 23-27, 2009 – Dubaï, UAE
  3. 3. 3 Interoperability Concept • « e-Government » refers to the use by government agencies of Information and Communication Technologies, to transform relations with citizens, businesses, and other administrations. • The concept of connected government is derived from the whole-of-government approach which is increasingly using technology as a strategic tool and as an enabler for public service innovation and productivity growth • Traditional Government  e-Government  Connected Government Interoperability of eGovernment services Six pillars for a connected Government • Citizen Centric Evolution Model • Standard Interoperability Infrastructure • Reorganized Back-Office • Clear Governance Modalities • Innovative Organisation Models • Reinforced Social Inclusion B. Bounabat. e-Government Services Interoperability. 15th GCC eGovernment and eServices Forum May 23-27, 2009 – Dubaï, UAE
  4. 4. 4 Interoperability Concept • Interoperability : – e-Government interoperability is the ability of constituencies to work together. – At a technical level, it is the ability of a system or process to use information and/or functionality of another system or process by adhering to common standards. • Fundamental characteristics : – Interoperability is general – It can be implemented by using standards and norms – It enhances fluidity and security of information exchanges Interoperability of eGovernment services Interoperability owes nothing at random B. Bounabat. e-Government Services Interoperability. 15th GCC eGovernment and eServices Forum May 23-27, 2009 – Dubaï, UAE
  5. 5. 5 « As-is » state Public Information System as a metalic cupboard ? Employement Education Finance Social development Administration Citizen Health Enterprise Interoperability of eGovernment services B. Bounabat. e-Government Services Interoperability. 15th GCC eGovernment and eServices Forum May 23-27, 2009 – Dubaï, UAE
  6. 6. 6 Why e-government interoperability is important? Interoperability of eGovernment services Better decisions Better public services Better governance B. Bounabat. e-Government Services Interoperability. 15th GCC eGovernment and eServices Forum May 23-27, 2009 – Dubaï, UAE
  7. 7. 7 « To-be » state Interoperability Platform = Government Gateway Employement Education Finance Social development Administration Citizen Health Enterprise Authentification Normalisation Security Data exchangesMutualisation Interoperability of eGovernment services B. Bounabat. e-Government Services Interoperability. 15th GCC eGovernment and eServices Forum May 23-27, 2009 – Dubaï, UAE
  8. 8. 8 Government Gateway • FAQ : What is a Government Gateway, in terms of infrastructure ? • UK-Gateway : The Government Gateway consists of : – a set of centrally hosted and managed hardware and software that provides the Government Gateway User Interface (www.gateway.gov.uk); – the underlying user identity management services and interfaces; – and a middleware XML hub that provides the messaging services that link together front- and back-end systems. • Government Gateway provides a single, reliable, secure and consistent route for secure, authenticated messages into and out of customer backend systems. Interoperability of eGovernment services B. Bounabat. e-Government Services Interoperability. 15th GCC eGovernment and eServices Forum May 23-27, 2009 – Dubaï, UAE
  9. 9. 9 Interoperability setting-up Two major approaches : • Standard oriented : General Interoperability Framework • Architecture Oriented: Entreprise Architecture & Service Oriented Architecture Standard Interoperability of eGovernment services B. Bounabat. e-Government Services Interoperability. 15th GCC eGovernment and eServices Forum May 23-27, 2009 – Dubaï, UAE
  10. 10. 10 Interoperability initiatives overview Country Initiative Objectives UK UK-Gateway Integrate local and central public e-services via the UK-Gateway palteform Danemark GEA Use an Enterprise Architecture Framework to plan the development and the interoperability of public information systems Ireland PSB Integrate public s-services via the Public Services Broker (PSB) built on a SOA (Service Oriented Architecture) approach Belgium Set-up a “one-stop shop” provided by multiple access channels Europe IDABC Use the ICT to encourage and support the delivery of cross-border public sector services to citizens, enterprises and administrations in Europe USA FEA Elaborate and apply the FEA (Federal Enterprise Architecture), set of reference models that insures federal agencies governance and integration Interoperability of eGovernment services B. Bounabat. e-Government Services Interoperability. 15th GCC eGovernment and eServices Forum May 23-27, 2009 – Dubaï, UAE
  11. 11. 11 Interoperability initiatives overview Interopérabilité des services de e-gouvernement Country Initiative Objectives Brazil Interoperability Agenda Integrate local, regional or federal public e-services Saudi Arabia Yesser program Set-up a national interoperability infrastructure and define all the common standards to be imperatively adopted by the administrations Srilanka Lanka Gate Put on-line the totality of public services via ‘Lanka Gate’ that is a global integration plateform Singapore PSI initiative Implement the PSI (Public Service Infrastructure), the first South- East Asian infrastructure that integrates the publics e-services (successful bet) Romania NES Set up the National Electronic System (NES), supporting the one- stop shop to the eGovernement services Turkey e-Devlet Kapisi Insure e-services access via a single window - In conformance with the EIF (Europeran Interoperaility Framework) B. Bounabat. e-Government Services Interoperability. 15th GCC eGovernment and eServices Forum May 23-27, 2009 – Dubaï, UAE
  12. 12. 12 Key Success Factors  Setting-up a clear and strong Interoperability Governance  Elaborating and applying a General Interoperability Framework  Adopting a Service Oriented Architecture approach  Reinforcing data exchanges security and accessibility Interoperability of eGovernment services Standard B. Bounabat. e-Government Services Interoperability. 15th GCC eGovernment and eServices Forum May 23-27, 2009 – Dubaï, UAE
  13. 13. Outline • Interoperability of eGovernment services • Interoperability Governance • General Interoperability Framework • Architecture oriented approach 13B. Bounabat. e-Government Services Interoperability. 15th GCC eGovernment and eServices Forum May 23-27, 2009 – Dubaï, UAE
  14. 14. 14 Objectives • To identify, to treat and/or to eliminate any obstacles (cultural, legislative, financial, etc.), that can prevent departments from integrating services and public administrations from sharing information • For the European Public Administration Network:  without a governance regime: – each agency will continue to take an insular view of service delivery; – although service delivery may be coordinated within an agency, there will still be no clear vision of what is required at a pan-public service level; – the cost of development of technologies, standards, protocols and policies will be replicated across multiple agencies; – each agency will be required to meet eGovernment targets solely from within their own budgetary constraints; – new and innovative ways of working will not be easily identified; and – provision of aggregated services to allow customers view service delivery from the “life event” approach will not be easy to achieve. EPAN eGovernment Working Group (2004). Key Principles of an Interoperability Architecture. Interoperability Governance B. Bounabat. e-Government Services Interoperability. 15th GCC eGovernment and eServices Forum May 23-27, 2009 – Dubaï, UAE
  15. 15. 15 Problems to solve • Typical scenario : An administration needs to make its on- line services collaborate in order to serve better its customers (“Citizen life cycle vision”) – Are there any legal constraints ? How can the administration eliminate them? – Which governmental authority, if there are any, is in charge of required standards selection and management? – What are the prerequisite Resource Human skills – What is the change management scale? • Recommended Solution : Interoperability Governance Lead Agency Interoperability Governance B. Bounabat. e-Government Services Interoperability. 15th GCC eGovernment and eServices Forum May 23-27, 2009 – Dubaï, UAE
  16. 16. 16 Objectives & Missions • Political missions – Focusing on and communicating the importance of interoperability strategies and programs – Strengthening cooperation between administrations – Following and reporting about all interoperability aspects evolutions at the international level • Legal missions – Setting-up andor updating national legal arsenal in order to meet all new requirements dictated by more extensive cooperation between administrations – Watching information security, intellectual property and users’ private life protection • Economic missions – Designing, implementing and monitoring private public partnerships targeting to achieve interoperability goals – Elaborating financial plans for the acquisition and deployment of interoperability solutions • Leadership – Defining the responsibilities of the interoperability strategy stake holders – Supporting their commitment spirit, participation will and communication efforts – undertaking he necessary training plans for the success of interoperability project Interoperability Governance B. Bounabat. e-Government Services Interoperability. 15th GCC eGovernment and eServices Forum May 23-27, 2009 – Dubaï, UAE
  17. 17. 17 National Lead Agency • EPAN recommends that « a single agency should be responsible for technical and semantic interoperability aspects of the Global Interoperability Framework » Interoperability Governance B. Bounabat. e-Government Services Interoperability. 15th GCC eGovernment and eServices Forum May 23-27, 2009 – Dubaï, UAE
  18. 18. 18 National Lead Agency Characteristics • Separated from all departments to ensure independence; • Seen as expert in the field of interoperability to engender trust; • Capable of working as a collaborative partner with all the concerned stake holders; • Proactive in the promotion and promulgation of standards and their use; • Responsible for monitoring usage of and adherence to standards, guidelines, policies and protocols; • Singularly focused on standardizing and providing interoperability on a pan-public service basis; and • Considered as an advisory body to support agencies in developing strategies, implementing solutions, coordinating cross-agency aggregated services and to communities of practice in setting and publishing standards. Interoperability Governance B. Bounabat. e-Government Services Interoperability. 15th GCC eGovernment and eServices Forum May 23-27, 2009 – Dubaï, UAE
  19. 19. Outline • Interoperability of eGovernment services • Interoperability Governance • General Interoperability Framework • Architecture oriented approach 19B. Bounabat. e-Government Services Interoperability. 15th GCC eGovernment and eServices Forum May 23-27, 2009 – Dubaï, UAE
  20. 20. 20 The Concept • General Interoperability Framework (GIF) : Structured Set of norms, standards, specifications and policies aiming to insure the interoperability between Administration, customers (citizens and enterprises) and government partners systems. Country GIF Publication Year Remarks Belgium BELGIF 2005 Aiming to Promote interoperability at national and European levels Danemark Reference Profile 2003 Simultaneous to the setting up of the governmental enterprise architecture France CCI RGI 2003 2007 Dealing with the 3 interoperability levels : organisational, semantic and technical United Kingdom e-GIF 2000 Version 6.1 was published in March 2005 !!! Brazil e-PING 2004 Pioneer in South American countries Europe EIF 2004 European Interoperability Framework Others Mauritius (GIF, 2002), Malaysia (My GIF, 2003), Sri Lanka (LIFe, 2006) Saudi Arabia (Yefi, 2005), Greece (G-GIF, 2002), Morocco (2008) General Interoperability Framework B. Bounabat. e-Government Services Interoperability. 15th GCC eGovernment and eServices Forum May 23-27, 2009 – Dubaï, UAE
  21. 21. 21 TheContent • Typical content : Standards relative to the 3 interoperability dimensions : organisational (Business Process), semantic, and/or technical • The GIF Technical layer references policies, norms and/or standards dealing with (Australia, Brazil, Denmark, Malaysia, New-Zeland, UK) : – System interconnection – Governmental Data Integration and exchange – Meta Data description – Interfaces and accessibility – Connection and Integration of Web based application – Security and privacy – Specific domains (e-Health, e-Education, etc.) General Interoperability Framework B. Bounabat. e-Government Services Interoperability. 15th GCC eGovernment and eServices Forum May 23-27, 2009 – Dubaï, UAE
  22. 22. 22 Standards Selection • 7 +3 key principles for the introduction of a standard in the GIF : Interoperability, Scalability (adaptability), Reusability, Openness (Open Standards), Recognized on the market, Privacy, Security + Accessibility (EIF), Multilingualism(EIF), Transparency (e-Ping) General Interoperability Framework Preference goes to the most widely spread standards in the following order : international, regional, then national http://www.govtalk.gov.uk/documents/e-GIF-v6_1.doc B. Bounabat. e-Government Services Interoperability. 15th GCC eGovernment and eServices Forum May 23-27, 2009 – Dubaï, UAE
  23. 23. 23 Expected characteristics • To insure balance between innovation needs and public services stability • To be aligned on the national strategy of Electronic Government Development • To be flexible, by – Clearly indicating the adopted standard selection approach – Eliminating any rigidity factor, particularly while introducing an emergent standard, or suppressing an obsolete one – Attaching to each standard a specific clause that describes its life cycle (sunset clause) • To be systematically used and referenced in any public call for tender • To be systematically used for the validation of the conformance of any new information system component Standard General Interoperability Framework B. Bounabat. e-Government Services Interoperability. 15th GCC eGovernment and eServices Forum May 23-27, 2009 – Dubaï, UAE
  24. 24. Outline • Interoperability of eGovernment services • Interoperability Governance • General Interoperability Framework • Architecture Oriented approach 24B. Bounabat. e-Government Services Interoperability. 15th GCC eGovernment and eServices Forum May 23-27, 2009 – Dubaï, UAE
  25. 25. 25 Gouvernemental Enterprise Architecture - The Concept Architecture oriented approach International GEA projects • USA : FEA, DoDaff, Nascio • Danemark : GEA • Canada : GEA • Ireland : PSB • Germany : SAGA B. Bounabat. e-Government Services Interoperability. 15th GCC eGovernment and eServices Forum May 23-27, 2009 – Dubaï, UAE • Governmental Enterprise Architecture (GEA) : – Strategic Roadmap that relates and aligns ICT with the governmental functions that it supports – It is an essential tool for effectively and efficiently engineering administration processes and for implementing and evolving supporting systems. It can also be used to evaluate the IT organisational alignment.
  26. 26. 26 GEA and eGovernments Services Interoperability • The adaptation of public information systems to the standards is a key success factor for eGov services interoperability • This necessary adaptation can be facilitated by the definition of a common GEA for all administrations. Indeed : – Comparison of the technological, data and application layers of two public information systems makes it possible to detect the differences between the standards and the means used for the construction of each layer. – The evaluation of these differences can indicate with precision not only the real possibilities of the integration of both systems, but can also plan this integration through the two architectures road-maps. B. Bounabat. e-Government Services Interoperability. 15th GCC eGovernment and eServices Forum May 23-27, 2009 – Dubaï, UAE Institute For Enterprise Architecture Developments : www.enterprise-architecture.info Architecture oriented approach
  27. 27. Service Oriented Architecture – The Concept • SOA : – A type of business information architecture model designed to allow all current business processes as well as future process additions to be integrated. – Large processes and applications are broken into smaller units also called services. – A service orientation defines the needs and outcomes of e-government in terms of services, independent from the technology (hardware platform, operating system, and programming language) that implements them – Services can be orchestrated (combined and recombined) into different solutions and scenarios, as determined by the business needs • SOA domains are a subset of the GEA domains : SOA uses the outcome of business processes and other business architecture artifacts as input to identify business services. • “Chinese Experience consists of : – choosing a technical plan based on SOA – making the most use of all existent systems and infrastructures – minimizing the wasting of previous investment” Li Jinjin, President of Beijing Zhonghaijiyuan Digital Technology Co., Ltd. April 2007. 27B. Bounabat. e-Government Services Interoperability. 15th GCC eGovernment and eServices Forum May 23-27, 2009 – Dubaï, UAE Architecture oriented approach
  28. 28. GIF or Architecture ? • The two approaches are complementary – Example : Germany’s Standards and Architecture of e-Government Applications (SAGA V2.0) – SAGA = GIF + GEA/SOA. • GIF = a building code • GEA/SOA = a town plan 28B. Bounabat. e-Government Services Interoperability. 15th GCC eGovernment and eServices Forum May 23-27, 2009 – Dubaï, UAE Architecture oriented approach Standard
  29. 29. Lessons to remember about eGov Interoperability • Achieving e-government interoperability is not easy and requires leadership and commitment. • Policy makers need to play various roles concerning the elaboration and application of GIF and/or the setting up of EA/SOA. • The absence of demonstrable commitment to interoperability by senior government officials would be counterproductive to the efforts of the government in harnessing the power of ICT for good governance and national development. • No government will achieve interoperability in one big step. Securing interoperability is a process that includes many incremental activities over time. • To truly enable interoperability between governmental departments, we do not start with technology but with defining clear a government strategic framework as well as the vision and goals of its leaders. 29B. Bounabat. e-Government Services Interoperability. 15th GCC eGovernment and eServices Forum May 23-27, 2009 – Dubaï, UAE
  30. 30. Benchmarking et Perspectives pour l’administration marocaine, Atelier BM, 22-23 Avril 2008, Rabat 30 Thank youThank you e-Government Services Interoperability: Benchmark and Key Success Factors   Pr. Bouchaïb Bounabat bounabat@ensias.ma

×