Successfully reported this slideshow.
Your SlideShare is downloading. ×

Matrix Revolutions: Ebook Indexing - ebookcraft 2016 - Pilar Wyman

Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Loading in …3
×

Check these out next

1 of 38 Ad
Advertisement

More Related Content

More from BookNet Canada (20)

Recently uploaded (20)

Advertisement

Matrix Revolutions: Ebook Indexing - ebookcraft 2016 - Pilar Wyman

  1. 1. Matrix Revolutions ebook Indexing Pilar Wyman eBookcraft 2016 Toronto, Canada 30 March 2016
  2. 2. The Matrix – indexing options  With the matrix, you too can discern the way to index outputs in all kinds of formats, from all kinds of tools.  In the face of so much information, where’s the best access?
  3. 3.  Ebook formats:  EPUB 3 (open source)  KF8 (Kindle Fire)  Mobi (Kindle)  Ebook readers:  Specialised (Kobos, Nooks)  Personal computers (PCs)  Smart phones Ebooks, reading
  4. 4.  Open source ebook standard  Developed and maintained by IDPF  Uses existing standards where possible  International, with strong focus on accessibility EPUB 3
  5. 5.  Uses XHTML  Much like websites  Differences relate to packaging: compression (zipped with .epub extension, navigational elements, structural elements, book-wide metadata based on Dublin Core) EPUB 3
  6. 6.  EPUB 3 Indexes Specification (http://www.idpf.org/epub/idx/) provides a standard that allows for ebook indexes that do everything print indexes do and more. EPUB 3 indexes
  7. 7. Ebook indexes:  Active, linked indexes  Clickable entries or locators linked to unique places in text, or offer other options Ebook indexes
  8. 8.  Better navigation  New features: index filtering  New features: range highlighting  New features: interactive generic cross- references EPUB 3 indexes
  9. 9. Better Navigation A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A abbreviations acceptable list, R1:52 in subheadings, R2:18–19 academic theology, R1:14, 18, 22 accents, R1:20 Access Innovations, R2:152 accounting basics of, S:8, 23–26 professional advice for, S:16 software, S:7, 23–24, 26 tracking system, S:49–50 ... - - A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A B back-of-the-book indexing. See book indexing back-ups, S:9, 48–50 backslashes, R2:92 Baggiano, Mauri, R2:54 bank accounts, S:8, 24 behavioral science textbooks, R2:57, 59 Bell, Hazel, R1:28, 36, 44, 45; R2:40 + - A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z L laser printers, M:34, 47–48; S:7, 8 legal cases, treatment of, R2:75 legal indexes locators in, R2:46 sub-subheadings in, R2:7 textbook, R2:54 legislation, R2:75–76 letter-by-letter alphabetization, R2:61 Levi-Strauss, Claude, R1:29 - Index groups allow the user to expand and collapse groups... ...or easily access a group by clicking the letter to jump to it (Combs)
  10. 10. … Lee, Fitzhugh, 19-20, 21f Lee, George Washington, 22-23 Lee, Robert E., 45-49, 49f, 51f Leventhorpe, Collett, 28-30, 32f, 33f Logan, Thomas, 39-40, 42 Long, Armistead, 45 … Index Filtering Index* * “f” following a locator indicates a figure Filter by? Figures Tables Filter … Lee, Fitzhugh, 21f Lee, Robert E., 49f, 51f Leventhorpe, Collett, 32f, 33f … Index A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Unfilter A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Index filtering allows the user to restrict the view to only figures, or only tables, for quick reference. (Combs)
  11. 11. Battles Antietam Chattanooga First Manassas Fort Pulaski Harper’s Ferry Lexington Pea Ridge Second Manassas Shiloh, … Battles. See names of specific battles … Generic cross references Antietam, 65 ... Battles. See names of specific battles ... Chattanooga, 56 ... First Manassas , 32 ... Fort Pulaski , 54 ... Harper’s Ferry , 62 ... Lexington , 40 ... Pea Ridge , 45 ... Second Manassas , 58 ... Shiloh , 51 ... Index Term categories (nav doc) Index Fully-functional generic cross references using term categories prevent the user having to guess at relevant terms. (Combs)
  12. 12. After his success at Chancellorsville in Virginia in May 1863, the Confederate Army marched through the Shenandoah Valley to begin their second invasion of the North— the Gettysburg Campaign... Elements of the two armies initially collided at Gettysburg on July 1, 1863, as Lee urgently concentrated his forces against Brig. Gen. John Buford... Lee was forced to change his plans. Longstreet would command Pickett's Virginia division of his own First Corps, plus six brigades from Hill's ... Around 1 p.m., from 150 to 170 Lee ordered an artillery bombardment... Body of book Index Buford, John, 21 … Gettysburg, 20-29 … Lee, Robert E., 21-23 ¶20 ¶21 ¶22 ¶23 Range Highlighting Range highlighting helps the user quickly identify where coverage of a topic begins and ends
  13. 13. Software tools for ebook indexing
  14. 14.  outputs  print  HTML  XML  PDF  eBook  Apps  index inputs  standalone  MSWord  XML eds  Frame  InDesign  other? Ebook indexes: overview
  15. 15.  Linking to entries vs embedding entries in content files Work flow issues
  16. 16. Software options Linked entries Embedded entries XHTML anchors or unique IDs. Unique IDs must be convertible by a compiler into XHTML anchors or other anchor format as required for links to work. Index entries are inserted directly into content as fields, XML elements, or using the program’s own unique marking system. Content that is inserted into files:
  17. 17. Granularity: Linked entries Embedded entries Yes. But links only go to where unique IDs are located. NOTE: Display of content varies depending on reading device size and view settings. NOTE: Indexers should consider carefully which IDs to use as locators. Links can go to any level. NOTE: Different workflows dictate what is displayed as locators. Indexes must be recompiled as content changes. NOTE: Indexers should consider carefully where to embed markers. Software options
  18. 18. Single sourcing capabilities: Linked entries Embedded entries Yes. NOTE: If content is later edited, unique IDs may be lost. NOTE: Most workflows will rely on an outside compiler to generate different outputs, and to generate the index and create links to unique IDs. If the publishing software doesn’t natively provide good output, publisher may have to tweak manually. Yes. NOTE: InDesign CC outputs EPUB with active indexes, and active indexes in HTML if the book is one file. NOTE: Indesign and Frame can output active PDF indexes. NOTE: Word can output print indexes. NOTE: XML requires XSL style sheet or other automated process. Work flow issues
  19. 19. File Management: Linked entries Embedded entries Indexer has index files. Publisher has content files (indexer gets copy). Publisher needs to notify indexer when/if content changes. NOTE: Publisher OR indexer can run scripts to insert anchors. Indexer has copy of content files. NOTE: (1) Indexer works directly in content files, OR (2) Indexer works outside files with interim unique IDs as locators, client or indexer later runs macro to merge entries into files, OR (3) Indexer works in content file copy which will later be merged via software workflow with the master copy. NOTE: Workflow should include error checking. Work flow issues
  20. 20. Content Changes: Linked entries Embedded entries This is only a problem if using numbered locators such as page numbers, or paragraph or section numbers. If so, index must be reviewed carefully and changes made as appropriate. Index must be recompiled after each content change and the index reviewed for accuracy or errors. Every time. Work flow issues
  21. 21. Translation/Localization issues: Linked entries Embedded entries Translation of entries: Index is translated as a complete document, along with the text OR publisher may choose to request a complete re-index of the new translation. Locators: If using page numbers as locators, pagination may change. Translation of entries: Embedded entries must be translated along with the text. Locators: Locators will be generated when the index is regenerated. Work flow issues
  22. 22. Chunking/Customizing content: Linked entries Embedded entries Yes. Potential issues include: orphaned subheads, missing cross- references, and broken links. Yes. Potential issues include: orphaned subheads, missing cross- references, and broken links. Work flow issues
  23. 23. Updates and Revisions: Linked entries Embedded entries If original entries can be sorted consecutively (in order of appearance in the content), the indexer can easily review the index for changes. NOTE: Consider planning for this capability if later editions are anticipated. It depends … on software and production processes. NOTE: View index entries in context is helpful, as is a tool that highlights differences in versions of files. Work flow issues
  24. 24. Legacy Book Index Conversions: Linked entries Embedded entries (1) Obtain content files including index; (2) If necessary, insert unique anchors into content files; (3) Sort existing index into locator order; (4) Enter new locators that point to anchors rather than to page numbers; (5) Output the index in appropriate format to include in the eBook. If legacy book is in a layout/desktop publishing software, and if the software has a later version that supports active ebook export, convert files to the later version. Work flow issues
  25. 25. Break / Q&A
  26. 26. Standalone indexing: Print PDF HTML/Web e-Book (XHTML) Yes. NOTE: Unique IDs must be available to use as locators. Yes, with Sonar Activate NOTE: Locators must match Sonar requirements. NOTE: Acrobat 10 doesn’t work with Sonar at this time. Use Sonar Activate 6 for Acrobat Pro 9. Use Sonar Activate 5 for Yes, with locators that include anchor IDs (<a id=”xx”> tags) NOTE: HTML/Prep + CINDEX or Sky Index  links + appropriate files. NOTE: Macrex + style sheets  links + appropriate files. Yes, with locators that include anchor IDs (<a id=”xx”> tags) or Canonical Fragment IDs (CFIs) NOTE: HTML/Prep + CINDEX or SKY Index  links + appropriate files. NOTE: TExtract Software Options for Active Indexes
  27. 27. Microsoft Word: Print versions too? HTML (Web) PDF e-Book (XHTML) Yes, as long as unique IDs can show page numbers Yes, as long as locators point to embedded <a name=“xx”> tags in content code Yes, with Sonar Activate. Page numbering in book must match Sonar’s requirements (volume numbers and using differing page number schemes in same piece confuse it) Yes, as long as locators point to embedded <a name=“xx’> tags in content code or we could see utilization of CFI I EPUB. (Canonical Fragment IDs) Print PDF HTML/Web e-Book (XHTML) Yes. NOTE: No décor, specialized locators, or cross reference checking. Watch for multiple targets. Regenerate index before final printing. Yes, with Sonar Activate NOTE: Cross references will be static, not active. Yes, with third- party macros NOTE: Requires specialized macros to insert anchor tags (<a id=”xx”>) and links NOTE: MSWord links to page level. Yes, with third- party macros Same notes as for HTML/Web, PLUS: NOTE: TExtract may be of use. NOTE: While Amazon Create Space and Kindle Direct accept Word docs, indexes are NOT Software Options for Active Indexes
  28. 28. XML editors: Print versions too? HTML (Web) PDF e-Book (XHTML) Yes, as long as unique IDs can show page numbers Yes, as long as locators point to embedded <a name=“xx”> tags in content code Yes, with Sonar Activate. Page numbering in book must match Sonar’s requirements (volume numbers and using differing page number schemes in same piece confuse it) Yes, as long as locators point to embedded <a name=“xx’> tags in content code or we could see utilization of CFI I EPUB. (Canonical Fragment IDs) Print PDF HTML/Web e-Book (XHTML) Yes. NOTE: Requires a style sheet to output desired format. Yes NOTE: Requires a style sheet to output desired format. Yes NOTE: Requires a style sheet to output desired format and insert anchors and links. NOTE: Can link to word level. Yes NOTE: Requires a style sheet to output desired format and insert anchors and links. NOTE: Can link to word level. Software Options for Active Indexes
  29. 29. Adobe InDesign: Print versions too? HTML (Web) PDF e-Book (XHTML) Yes, as long as unique IDs can show page numbers Yes, as long as locators point to embedded <a name=“xx”> tags in content code Yes, with Sonar Activate. Page numbering in book must match Sonar’s requirements (volume numbers and using differing page number schemes in same piece confuse it) Yes, as long as locators point to embedded <a name=“xx’> tags in content code or we could see utilization of CFI I EPUB. (Canonical Fragment IDs) Print PDF HTML/Web e-Book (XHTML) Yes. NOTE: Regenerate before final printing. NOTE: To single- source in older versions, use scripts and standalone indexing software. Yes NOTE: Indexing plug-ins from Rich Bines activate print indexes for InDesign PDFs. Yes, in InDesign CC NOTE: InDesign CC indexes link only if you create books as one file. NOTE: Older versions strip out index entries upon export. Anchors must be inserted and then used as locators. Yes, with InDesign CC EPUB export. NOTE: Kindle formats are not supported. NOTE: Older versions strip out index entries. Use scripts or plug-ins, or standalone index with inserted HTML anchors. Software Options for Active Indexes
  30. 30. Scenarios
  31. 31. Scenarios We are in a rush and must get a book to press ASAP! – What’s the quickest way to get the index in? What tools should we use?
  32. 32. Scenarios We are not in a rush, and we would like to publish both digital and print editions. – Where do we start? What tools should we use?
  33. 33. Scenarios We are only interested in publishing electronically. – We can do the indexing any time, right?
  34. 34. Scenarios We just want to convert a print edition of a book we already published in digital format – that’s easy, no? Can’t we just work off the old PDF and the index we already got?
  35. 35. Scenarios  We do everything in InDesign/Word/Oxygen (name your poison), but haven’t upgraded to the new cloud-based service. And now we want to include an index. – What do we do?
  36. 36. Scenarios We are about to release a new edition. The only difference is a new chapter 25. We’re going to do both print and ebook editions this time, though. – Can you get us a new index? How quickly?
  37. 37.  ANZSI Indexing ebooks: http://anzsi.org/resources/reading-lists/indexing-ebooks/  ASI Digital Trends Task Force (DTTF) http://www.asindexing.org/about-indexing/digital-trends-task- force/  ASI Matrix Resources for Active Indexing: http://www.asindexing.org/wp- content/uploads/2013/08/matrixresourceslist.pdf  The Indexer March 2012: http://www.theindexer.org/  SI Publishing Technology Group: http://www.ptg-indexers.org.uk/about/ebooks.htm Resources
  38. 38. Contact us!  ASI DTTF dttf@asindexing.org  Pilar Wyman pilarw@wymanindexing.co m www.wymanindexing.com Resources

Editor's Notes

  • Thank you!
    Introduction.
    This workshop is based on previous presentations by Jan Wright, David K. Ream, Pilar Wyman, and Glenda Browne.
    First I will introduce ebook indexing, as well as the new EPUB standard for ebook indexes, and future directions for indexes. This overview will including indexing for EPUBs, for alternative ebook formats, and for content that will be output in multiple formats (print, pdf, html, xml, and more). [and get to know AUDIENCE]

    I will share current options for indexing ebooks vs print books. I will also discuss practical differences between hyper-linked and embedded indexes.

    Then I will introduce the Matrix, a workflow algorithm from the ASI DTTF (Digital Trends Task Force) for decision making regarding ebook indexing processes and for general workflow decisions.

    We’ll work through various scenarios, which we will resolve together with the help of the Matrix. These scenarios will be based on YOU and your needs.

    Overview: ebook indexing | indexing for EPUBs | indexing for alternative ebook formats | indexing for multiple formats | Matrix | scenarios
  • As Trinity said, “We can never see past the choices we don't understand.”
    The current state of indexing for digital books (ebooks, EPUBs, etc.) requires much improvement.
    Part of the problem is the lack of standards and the lack of consistent formats and the lack of known, tested workflows and production processes.
    Thus, the indexer is expected to provide index output in all kinds of formats, from all kinds of tools. Today’s tools and technology allow for greater interactivity than ever. We expect indexes to work, to be clickable and active and take us to precise places in text. This is what we are all working towards: functionality. As Joe Wikert recently posted in “The Lost Art of indexes in ebooks” (http://jwikert.typepad.com/the_average_joe/2016/03/the-lost-art-of-indexes-in-ebooks.html), “most ebooks don’t have indexes, the result of the misguided notion that text search is a better solution.”

  • Ebooks are electronic books with reflowable text which are read with specialised software on digital devices (computers of various sizes).
    The Mobi and KF8 Kindle formats are proprietary.
  • EPUB 3 is an open source ebook standard.
    EPUB is developed and maintained by the International Digital Publishing Forum (IDPF), a publishers’ trade association.
    EPUB 3 uses existing standards where possible (eg, XHTML, CSS3, SVG, DAISY, Dublin Core).
    It is international, and has a strong focus on accessibility.
  • Uses XHTML, similar to websites
    Navigational elements provide a set reading order, include manifest listing content elements, spine enumerating order of files
    Structural elements such as <section>, <aside>, and <figure> elements
    Metadata based on Dublin Core describes the language and date modified.
  • The EPUB 3 specification was approved March 2014
    Currently awaiting the final vote and implementation by reading systems & publishers
    See also the ASI DTTF (http://www.asindexing.org/about-indexing/digital-trends-task-force/).
  • Regardless of the specific book input or output, we want to create active indexes, that is indexes that work, that connect users via clicking to specific, appropriate, locations. Where print indexes are static, ebook indexes should NOT be static.

    This type of ‘active’ or activated index, with linkages from the index to the relevant text can be created via Embedded index terms, or via Hyperlinks (from the index) to anchors in the text.

    In active indexes:
    Users can click on entries or locators
    Users are taken to specific locations in text, or
    Users are offered other options to explore
  • The EPUB 3 indexes specification provides for indexes that do all that a print index can, and more.
    The EPUB 3 indexes provide examples of what functional indexes can do, of the functionality ebook indexes can provide for readers.
  • Index groups, which are coded by the publisher, allow the user to expand and collapse groups within the index. For example…
    George Kerscher is the President of the IDPF. He described how a blind person might search an index:
    I expect I would get to the beginning of a letter and then navigate to the item in alphabetical order. So, on my iPhone using VoiceOver I have about 2,500 names in my address book. I get to the letter I want and do a three finger swipe up or down to move me by about 20 names. Once I get close, I do a swipe right or left to get to the one I want. I would think that an index would work in much the same way (Kerscher 2012).
  • In a moment we’ll look at the ASI DTTF Matrix, which tabulates the choices that must be made when indexing ebooks.
    If you have not already done so, start a list of questions to ask your clients or writers, or yourself.
    Keep adding to this as the workshop continues. We will visit and discuss this later, in the scenarios.

    The matrix was created and is maintained by Michele Combs, David Ream, Jan Wright, Pilar Wyman, and Glenda Browne: http://www.asindexing.org/about-indexing/digital-trends-task-force/ Updated November 2013

    The December 2013 issue of The Indexer has a ‘full’ version in the article “The Matrix: creating an active index in all kinds of formats, from all kinds of tools,” by Jan Wright, Glenda Browne, Michele Combs, David Ream, and herself. An algorithmic work flow version of the matrix may be in the works.
    NB: The Matrix is a work in progress. The version you will see here is the most up to date.

    The matrix is actually two giant matrices, broken into smaller ones.
    First, it tabulates the more general process of linking vs embedding indexes.
    Second, it tabulates specific indexing tools and output options.
  • But first, we review:
    Active index inputs = from index (or other, production) software
    The inputs include our indexes, which we produce via our index software coupled with how the content we are indexing is input or created.
    Standalone software (Cindex, Macrex, Sky, TExtract, etc.), MSWord, XML editors (Oxygen or other proprietary tools), Frame, InDesign

    Outputs = The list of possible outputs clients and publishers expect and request of us is too specialized to list here.
    Ask the production people what they are using, and wing it if you have to!

    Regardless of the specific book input or output, we are working to create active indexes that work, that will connect users via clicking with specific, appropriate, precise locations. Except for print, these indexes are NOT static.

    This type of ‘activity’ or activated index, with linkages from the index to the relevant text can be created via
    Embedded index terms, or via
    Hyperlinks (from the index) to anchors in the text.

    That is, there are two ways to create active indexes:
    Index entries embedded in content files
    Traditional embedded indexing
    Needs compiler to create index
    Need mechanism to create links to content locations
    Index entries linked to unique IDs in texts
    Traditional standalone indexing
    Needs unique IDs or anchors in content, or a pinpoint location mechanism
    Needs to be in a format that understands coded links

    In active or functional indexes:
    Users can click on entries or locators
    Users are taken to specific locations in text, or
    Users are offered other options to explore
  • Again, the current state of indexing for digital books (ebooks, ePUBs, etc.) requires much improvement.
    Part of the problem is the lack of standards and the lack of consistent formats and the lack of known, tested workflows and production processes.
    Thus, we are expected to provide index output in all kinds of formats, from all kinds of tools.
    We are Trinity, Neo, and the rest of their cohorts.
    The first question to consider is whether to embed the index or include coded locators.
    The first matrices will present the options.

    This is slide is partly for kicks. Some of you may know these two, Jan Wright (left) and Glenda Browne (right), who have also presented the Matrix.
  • General index work-flow production matrix #1:
    What needs to be inserted into the content files (either by the publisher or the indexer)?
  • General index work-flow production matrix #3:
    Granularity: When you click on a link in the index, how close do you get to appropriate content in the text?

    In addition, re linked entries:
    --If IDs are at the paragraph level, links will take you to the paragraph only.
    --Viewer may have to scroll to get to view of referenced content.

  • General index work-flow production matrix #2:
    Single sourcing capabilities: Can we use one set of files to produce indexes in all kinds of output (PDF, HTML, XML, eBook)?

    NB: Word outputs print and (static) PDF indexes.

    See also later matrices for details and additional information.

    Single sourcing, especially for series or titles that will be updated frequently, is ever the Holy Grail in publishing.

  • General index work-flow production matrix #4:
    File management: Who has the files? When?

    In addition, re linked entries:
    --If the indexer inserts the anchors, they must return a copy of that set of files to the publisher. Any changes to content must be made to the set of files with those anchors/unique IDs.
    --Files can be tweaked once anchors/unique IDs are in, as long as they don’t delete anchors/unique IDs.

    In addition, re embedded entries:
    Unless the publisher has an accurate process for merging changed files, they should not make changes to content files once the indexer begins work. If publisher does make changes to content files, the workflow should include error checking.
  • General index work-flow production matrix #5:
    Content Changes: What if pagination changes or content moves around?

    Potential issues: missing or invalid cross-references, inconsistent headings
  • General index work-flow production matrix #6:
    Translation/Localization issues: What about translating/localizing content and index into other languages?

    NOTE: Index should ALWAYS be reviewed before final release of each new edition or publication.

    NOTE: Some languages are ‘wordier’ than others. Different editions are paginated differently.
  • General index work-flow production matrix #7:
    Chunking/Customizing content: Can you create smaller or customized books from selected chapters or other chunks and still have a workable index?

    NOTE: Index should ALWAYS be reviewed before final release of each new publication, however customized or chunked.

  • General index work-flow production matrix #8:
    Updates and Revisions: What about next year/month when we revise it?

    NOTE: My favorite answer, “Call me.”

    Index should ALWAYS be reviewed before final release of each new publication, however customized or chunked.

  • General index work-flow production matrix #9:
    Legacy Book Index Conversions: How can legacy books with indexes be published as ebooks with active indexes?

    In addition, re indexes with linked entries:
    Consider carefully the placement of unique anchors (page breaks, section headings, paragraphs, tables, figures, cells). The presence/absence of unique IDs dictates where entries will link.


    See also Dave Ream’s recent ASI Webinar on precisely this topic.


  • Break now, or after reviewing specific software options. If you have not already done so, review your list of questions to ask clients.
    Then we’ll share and discuss, and go into workflows for specific software and tools and scenarios.
  • Work-flow production matrix #1:
    What functional (linked) indexes can you get when starting with standalone indexing software?

    That is, what standalone indexes can you get from active (linked) indexes?


    In addition, with HTML/Web AND XHTML indexes:
    --Cross-references are active.
    --Indexes can be split by letter.

    NOTE: regarding TExtract™, which allows an indexer to add, edit, and control extracted index entries, and now supports anchors for eBook index output. This functionality has not been tested yet by the DTTF.

    NOTE: Macrex already provides all necessary coding, including linking of x-refs Macrex. (HTML/Prep may work with Macrex but Macrex users have not needed it.) The NOTE above applies to e-Books as well.
  • Work-flow production matrix #2:
    What functional (linked) indexes can you get when starting in MS Word?

    In addition, re print indexes:
    Word supports alternate sort, italics/bold in entries, generic ‘see’ refs.
    Word does not support n, nn, fig., t-style decorations or specialized locators (décor), or cross-reference checking. Watch out for multiple targets from cross-references. You MUST regenerate the index before final printing.

    In addition, re HTML/Web and XHTML indexes:
    Word is programmed to look only for the page the text is on at the time of generation.
    Again, TExtract may be of use – for specific as well as page-level links.
  • Work-flow production matrix #3:
    What functional (linked) indexes can you get when working with XML editors such as Oxygen?

    Oxygen ships with a DocBook-to-HTML style sheet that can be applied to generate a readable/proofable index when you compile the book.

    In addition, for print indexes: you can get italics and bold in entries, and generic cross-references.

    In addition, for HTML/Web and XHTML indexes:
    Oxygen ships with a DocBook-to-HTML style sheet that can be applied to generate a readable/proofable index when you compile the book. Oxygen supports italics and bold in entries, active and generic cross-references.

    NOTE: Proprietary XML editors may be a different story!

    In lieu of style sheets, style may also be set in other automated processes, such as a multi-step workflow (perl or python, etc.).
  • Work-flow production matrix #5:
    What functional (linked) indexes can you get when working in Adobe InDesign?

    InDesign CC and all CS versions produce print indexes
    In addition, re print indexes:
    --Don’t count on having any italics or bold in entry text.
    --The sort can be controlled.
    --Be careful with multiple targets from cross references. (There is no cross-reference checking.)
    --In older versions of InDesign CSx, when using scripts and standalone indexing software, full HTML anchors are placed in the text by the scripts and the page number is used as the HTML locator text in the hyperlinks. To get the print version, do a GREP search-and-replace to strip out HTML code in the locators.
    --Additional plugins are available to enhance the indexing module in InDesign, and for simple EPUB index output.
    --Macrex's specialization has taken the script output to new levels.

    In addition, re PDF indexes:
    For PDFs not generated from InDesign, use Sonar Activate to activate their print indexes. NB: cross-references will not be active.

    In addition, re HTML/Web indexes:
    While InDesign CC leaves index anchors in the HTML, that indexing works only if you create the book as one long file. Traditional Book File and Chapter File structuring doesn’t work.
    In addition, XHTML indexes:
    --Indenting is not perfect, but the CSS style sheet can be edited.
    --Cross-references are not active.
  • As time allows, we’ll play out the (6) scenarios in the slide deck here, as well as any others that have been given to me.
    Break into groups, and have each group present recommendations OR do as a whole, role play. Volunteers?
    I’m sure some of you have been in some of these or similar. We can tweak as we go. … Here we go:
  • Go back to slide 24.
  • This one should be done in all possible versions, in all poisons. Go back to slides 26-29.
  • What if the differences are not so neat?
    Go back to slides 23, 20, and 21.
  • NB: We have another tool to add – Em Software (based on QuarkXPress)

×