Twitter as Scholarship: How Not To Get Fired (Much)

543 views

Published on

How can scholars and academics find use and value in the fraught networked public sphere that Twitter embodies? This presentation - a public talk delivered at La Trobe University in Melbourne Australia, October 2016 - explores both the benefits and risks of Twitter, and examines its operations at the intersection of orality and literacy.

Published in: Education

Twitter as Scholarship: How Not To Get Fired (Much)

  1. 1. TWITTER AS SCHOLARSHIP How Not To Get Fired(much) BONNIE STEWART @bonstewart University of Prince Edward Island, Canada LaTrobe University, October 2016 http://xkcd.com/802/
  2. 2. Prince Edward Island?
  3. 3. WINTER IS COMING APRIL 2015. ew.
  4. 4. How did I get here?
  5. 5. Open networked scholarship
  6. 6. ACADEMIC TWITTER scholarship what people had for lunch TIMESTAMP: 2013
  7. 7. Rise of hashtag activism… TIMESTAMP: 2014 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shooting_of_Michael_Brown#/media/File:Memorial_to_Michael_Brown.jpg
  8. 8. + ‘Callout culture’
  9. 9. + backlash & rise of alt/right https://mobile.twitter.com/cartoon_neuron/status/618385493227642880
  10. 10. + increasing institutionalization of social media = increased perception of professional RISK
  11. 11. There are a lot of shuttered academic Twitter accounts. https://www.flickr.com/photos/duncan/3753886017/
  12. 12. This lens of risk isn’t wrong… but it’s not the whole picture. https://www.flickr.com/photos/the4mahers/6802850117/
  13. 13. So… HOW I LEARNED TO STOP WORRYING & LOVE THE TWITTERZ
  14. 14. Understanding the intersections between networked & academic premises is the KEY to value & safe(ish) use https://www.flickr.com/photos/28537647@N06/2887726958/
  15. 15. The work of two 20th century thinkers helped me understand Twitter as 21st century scholarship …and think about how to use it.
  16. 16. 1. Boyer: Networked practices as SCHOLARSHIP ¤ Scholarship of discovery ¤ Scholarship of integration ¤ Scholarship of application ¤ Scholarship of teaching ! (Boyer, 1990)
  17. 17. Academia & social media are both reputational economies http://www.flickr.com/photos/8113246@N02/7932198032
  18. 18. We are trained & acculturated to SIGNALS of scholarly excellence https://www.flickr.com/photos/126451798@N05/15076855933/
  19. 19. Those within the academy become very skilled at judging the stuff of reputations. Where has the person’s work been published, what claims of priority in discovery have they established, how often have they been cited, how and where reviewed, what prizes won, what institutional ties earned, what organizations led? (Willinsky, 2010)
  20. 20. Enter…knowledge abundance https://www.flickr.com/photos/piper/19904408 https://www.flickr.com/photos/jaredzimmerman/15728149611/
  21. 21. The gates are open https://www.flickr.com/photos/vince2012/14557320666/
  22. 22. Structure of abundance = networks https://plus.google.com/+DaveGray/posts/CQRVeKEsUvFpid=5751686447270321954&oid=117373186752666867801
  23. 23. Networked publics: many-to-many signals http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/it/thumb/d/d8/Do_Not_Adjust_Your_Set.jpg/280px-Do_Not_Adjust_Your_Set.jpg
  24. 24. …Like a party line with multiple private/public options https://www.flickr.com/photos/94342662@N00/3869483214/
  25. 25. capacity to contribute to “The Conversation” scale of visibility common interests & disciplines shared ties Network signals do similar work… more openly Factors contributing to perceived influence & value in academic Twitter – Stewart, 2015
  26. 26. MY STORY: My local cohort, Ph.D year 2 Me, studying networks & education V, 6hrs away, studying music ed Z, working 1hr away, studying leadership in ed
  27. 27. Twitter = a cohort without borders http://www.flickr.com/photos/bswise/4457290211/
  28. 28. Many-to-many signals = global communities of practice & mentorship
  29. 29. Benefits as thinker: just-in-time choral conversation
  30. 30. Benefits as learner: support & care
  31. 31. Benefits as writer: crowdsourcing
  32. 32. Benefits as teacher: opportunities to connect students to real audiences
  33. 33. Benefits as scholar: connection to leaders
  34. 34. + expansion of audience https://www.flickr.com/photos/tattoodjay/4129779298/
  35. 35. + opportunity. Thanks to many-to- many communications on Twitter.
  36. 36. Academic Twitter = a scholarship of abundance https://www.flickr.com/photos/92998734@N03/8466586880/
  37. 37. (sometimes change is good.)
  38. 38. Great. But what about when open, networked signals don’t feel good? And don’t feel like scholarship? https://www.flickr.com/photos/edenpictures/14399024753
  39. 39. 2. Ong: The CULTURE of an environment is shaped by its communications medium
  40. 40. Oral Tradition ¤ Participatory ¤ Situational ¤ Social ¤ Formulaic ¤ Agonistic ¤ Rhetorical
  41. 41. …sound kinda like Twitter?
  42. 42. Literate Tradition ¤ Interiorized ¤ Abstracted ¤ Innovative ¤ Precise ¤ Analytic ¤ Indexical https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Letterpress_printing#/media/File:The_Caxton_Celebration_- _William_Caxton_showing_specimens_of_his_printing_to_King_Edward_IV_and_his_Queen.jpg
  43. 43. Academia is the instantiation of what Ong calls ‘high literacy.’ …sound kinda like academia?
  44. 44. Ong’s secondary orality + secondary literacy “The network message from one person to another / others is very rapid and can in effect be in the present… textualized verbal exchange registers psychologically as having the temporal immediacy of oral exchange.” (Ong, 1996)
  45. 45. Speech-based expectations Call-out Culture = Collapsed Publics Print-based interpretations
  46. 46. The ORALITY of Twitter – which demands ongoing participation, performativity beyond rank, casual sociality, & a different type of conflict – creates challenges.
  47. 47. Challenge: context collapse (Wesch, 2009; boyd, 2011) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dress_code
  48. 48. Challenge: virality
  49. 49. http://www.flickr.com/photos/21031300@N02/4076687726/ Challenge: permanence
  50. 50. Challenge: the ‘comments section’
  51. 51. Challenge: differential identity reception & targeting
  52. 52. Challenge: predatory labour masked as “exposure”
  53. 53. (Okay, *that* one’s a lot like academia)
  54. 54. How can we navigate Twitter in a way that contributes to our scholarship & humanity, rather than risking either? *assuming Twitter continues to exist*
  55. 55. http://www.flickr.com/photos/tmesis/21126825/ Remember, the internet is people. Who read signals.
  56. 56. To start signaling, build an identity
  57. 57. You need to work on your identity before it will work for you.
  58. 58. Figure out who you want to signal to.
  59. 59. ¤  #phdchat ¤  #edchat ¤  #ECRchat ¤  #ScholarSunday ¤  #GetYourManuscriptOut ¤  #acwri ¤  #SaturdaySchool ¤  #highered ¤  #digped ¤  #WithaPhD ¤  #science Connect: #s help you find people with shared interests #
  60. 60. Share. Your work AND that of others. Cite & credit people. http://www.flickr.com/photos/ryanr/142455033/
  61. 61. Be patient. Be friendly. Be part of the conversation.
  62. 62. Believe in the value of your contribution.
  63. 63. Twitter can help your scholarship become many-to-many scholarship https://www.flickr.com/photos/122135325@N06/15117809516/in/dateposted/
  64. 64. But to succeed AND not get fired, it helps to remember: BE HONEST
  65. 65. Always do a ‘shoulder check.’ http://www.flickr.com/photos/ooocha/2632434274/sizes/z/in/photostream/
  66. 66. Institutions are made of people too
  67. 67. Don’t expect a soapbox
  68. 68. Don’t confuse your free speech with your privilege
  69. 69. Don’t aim to be HUGE
  70. 70. Don’t push to tie open networked scholarship TO academic reward systems
  71. 71. https://www.flickr.com/photos/51764518@N02/9763729373/
  72. 72. You can inhabit both worlds – the academic & the networked – at the same time, to the benefit of both.
  73. 73. What signals will you send? THANK YOU @bonstewart bstewart@upei.ca

×