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Becoming a Networked Scholar

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Scholarship is no longer solely the purview of institutions. The why, the how, and the benefits & challenges of building an online profile and network in a time of knowledge abundance.

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Becoming a Networked Scholar

  1. 1. Becoming a Networked Scholar Bonnie Stewart University of Prince Edward Island h"ps://www.flickr.com/photos/gforsythe/8717211019/  
  2. 2. dissemination of knowledge what people had for lunch CHANGE IN HIGHER ED Premise: Online networks enable different forms of academic identity and influence than institutions do
  3. 3. • THE WHY
  4. 4. Why? Multiple Axes of Change knowledge scarcity knowledge abundance anytime, anywhere public funding marketization set time & place
  5. 5. Knowledge Abundance h"p://www.flickr.com/photos/sila>x/9886617776/sizes/c  
  6. 6. Structure of abundance = Networks
  7. 7. Price of admission = public identity
  8. 8. h"ps://www.flickr.com/photos/ooohoooh/1350774613/   Networks are not just for consuming, but connecting.
  9. 9. Many-to-many communications h"p://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/it/thumb/d/d8/Do_Not_Adjust_Your_Set.jpg/280px-­‐Do_Not_Adjust_Your_Set.jpg  
  10. 10. Knowledge abundance enables us to create ourselves as network nodes, forming webs of visible (& invisible) connections h"ps://www.flickr.com/photos/mkhmarke>ng/8468788107  
  11. 11. Democratizing?
  12. 12. Some nodes are more equal than others
  13. 13. Networks & institutions are both reputational economies
  14. 14. To become readable in networks, you need to learn how to read. h"ps://www.flickr.com/photos/koonisutra/7001349018/  
  15. 15. • THE HOW
  16. 16. “Those within the academy become very skilled at judging the stuff of reputations. Where has the person’s work been published, what claims of priority in discovery have they established, how often have they been cited, how and where reviewed, what prizes won, what institutional ties earned, what organizations led?” Willinsky, 2010
  17. 17. Reading Status Signals •  Where you went to school •  Who your supervisor was •  Where you’ve published (& their impact factor) •  Your h-index •  Your citation count •  The associations you belong to •  Your rank in the academic hierarchy
  18. 18. …but now…
  19. 19. Networks = self-dissemination & new signals
  20. 20. Intersecting Prestige Economies Institutional Scholarship Google How work gets seen/known/used
  21. 21. Google yourself. What do your signals say? •  Are you visible on the first page? •  Can I find an interactive platform through which to engage with you or your work? •  Do you share your own work and that of others openly? •  Can I see you speak/talk/teach? •  Are there any red flags?
  22. 22. For building academic identity & influence online, you need a platform.
  23. 23. h"ps://www.flickr.com/photos/jiscinfonet/12947691804/in/album-­‐72157641903755433/  
  24. 24. Networked Scholarship: A Study
  25. 25. What do you SEE when you look at a Twitter profile?
  26. 26. images!
  27. 27. Institutional affiliation doesn’t matter (except Oxford) longevity!
  28. 28. Shared contexts & standing out
  29. 29. capacity to contribute to “The Conversation” scale of visibility common interests & disciplines shared ties Influence = perception of capacity to contribute
  30. 30. Sometimes…I’ll choose someone with twenty followers, because I come across something they’ve managed to say in 140 characters, and I think “oh, look at you, crafting on a grain of rice.” - @KateMfD h"ps://www.flickr.com/photos/visualpanic/843670538  
  31. 31. • THE WHAT IT DOES
  32. 32. Is the effort worth it?
  33. 33. Benefits as human: support & care
  34. 34. Benefits as thinker: just-in-time choral conversation
  35. 35. Benefits as writer: crowdsourcing
  36. 36. Benefits as learner & scholar: engagement & perspective
  37. 37. Benefits as learner & scholar: access & profile
  38. 38. Benefits as teacher: opportunities to connect students to real audiences
  39. 39. How will I know if I’m succeeding?
  40. 40. 9 years blogging, 8 years on Twitter, 3 months with a Ph.D •  4 peer-reviewed publications (+ 3 more pending review) •  17 public articles on higher ed & networks (Salon, The Guardian UK, Inside Higher Ed) •  474 citations •  11 keynote/plenary presentations •  30+ conference talks •  5 local/national CBC radio appearances •  place at the table in leading conversations in my field
  41. 41. + uncountable flops, failures, rejections, dead-ends, and sites of confusion & uncertainty
  42. 42. h"p://www.keepcalmstudio.com/gallery/poster/X1cVAD  
  43. 43. What signals will you send?
  44. 44. Questions?

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