Cyd Harrell - State of The Vendor Circus

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  • \n
  • back in the day, there was a lot of technology associated with research\nbut it was all for documenting it, not really for doing it\n\n
  • our major tools as researchers were things that live inside us\nwe knew how to elicit different kinds of information\nhow to structure research interactions\nwhat to do with qualitative data\nwe’re still good at all those things\n\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
  • So, something changed a few years ago. People started to create software to make this easier, and maybe to expand it a little bit. First it was really helping researchers do some of the traditional practices remotely. Or reducing the cost of those labs. But it started to branch out. And then more and more software, real experimentation, so now, I count 60 or so tools that are supposed to do or help do user research.\nWe’ve got a sack full of hammers and we could just saddle up and go looking for some nails. And we might have happy clients if we did.\n
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  • I read a lot of science fiction, and my ideal relationship with these kinds of tools is to think about the exoskeletons that badass characters have. (And yes, Raytheon actually built a prototype.) They amplify what the person inside can do, but they don’t act for them. So the angle I like to take on the tools is\n
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  • The spirit is right. I'm not sure the representation works. (I wasn't sure if the arrow was going in the direction of more hate or more love since it starts at "hates it".)\n\nAlso, Hate is probably the wrong word. I don't hate the methods. I could care less about the data collection methods. \n\nWhat I care about is the sloppy way those methods drive people to making solid, informed inferences. \n\nFor example, I don't hate eye tracking equipment. (In fact, I think it has lots of cool uses, like giving quadriplegics a power assistive device.) I hate when someone tells me they watched the blue dot on the eye tracker and the user didn't see the link. They don't know what the user saw because the eye tracker doesn't tell them anything about what users see. It only tells them what the device thinks the user gazed at, which has nothing to do with what they see.  I've proven I can gaze directly at the ketchup bottle on the top shelf of the fridge all day without seeing it.\n\nThe problem with unmoderated tools is they always have unmoderated analysis. People who have no skill in making proper inferences end up making bad inferences.\n\nWhile we shouldn't blame DVD players for bad Jim Carrey movies, we can do something to reduce the problem. Sure you can make proper inferences from these tools, but when you've expended all the energy to train the users to make great inferences (which, by the way, greatly reduce the perceived value of the results because everything has to be qualified), you probably are better off using the more traditional methods that return equivalent value for about the same cost.\n\nNow, get that on a slide. :)\n\nJared\n\n\n
  • Here are some of the tools out here. \n
  • There are some unexpected advantages to some of these methods. Usertesting passed along some unexpected use of their tool, which some of you said you were interested in learning more. \n
  • Here are some of the tools out here. \n
  • Here are some of the tools out here. \n
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  • Nate chimes in\n
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  • Cyd Harrell - State of The Vendor Circus

    1. 1. WTF with all these tools anyway? 2010 edition late
    2. 2. 12 years ago us e rre s e a rcb tool s
    3. 3. Methods & Practices• Empathy• Curiosity• Interviewing skills• Analytical techniques
    4. 4. Since 2007
    5. 5. Nobody wants this
    6. 6. What a circus.
    7. 7. How can we avoid...
    8. 8. justmoretechnology
    9. 9. Can tools make usbetter researchers?
    10. 10. Weaknesses• Most of these tools are for websites*• None of them can ask the right questions• Most of them are incomplete• Many of them aren’t really for us *There’s actually more to life
    11. 11. 5CATEGORIES
    12. 12. ModeratedSelf-Moderated For A Long TimeAutomated Live ConceptualAutomated StaticWeb Analytics
    13. 13. Talk To PeoplePeople Talk To A Machine For A Long TimeTasks On A Live Site Tasks On ConceptsTasks On ImagesFancy-Ass Analytics
    14. 14. InsightAmmunition For Ad AgenciesMore Ammunition I.A. & NavigationStill More AmmunitionJust Better Analytics
    15. 15. ModeratedSelf-Moderated For A Long TimeAutomated Live ConceptualAutomated Static Deep Behavioral UXWeb Analytics Insight
    16. 16. Moderated OpinionsSelf-Moderated For A Long TimeAutomated Live ConceptualAutomated StaticWeb Analytics
    17. 17. Moderated Ad Agencies Love ItSelf-Moderated For A Long TimeAutomated Live ConceptualAutomated StaticWeb Analytics
    18. 18. Moderated Jared Says Watch Out ForSelf-Moderated Bad Inferences For A Long TimeAutomated Live ConceptualAutomated StaticWeb Analytics
    19. 19. Most important thing in the box
    20. 20. Rdio Recipe• GoToMeeting: 5 users (moderated)• UserTesting.com: 10 users (self-moderated)• Usabilla: 50 users (automated)• Ethnio: 468 recruits
    21. 21. DUAL LENSSTREAMINGFIELD RESEARCH• Livestream• Flip Cam• It’s the view finder, silly• Actual duct tape
    22. 22. Go forth• What’s the craziest research idea you’ve ever had?• Maybe one (or three) of these tools can make it happen.• Keep your duct tape handy.
    23. 23. Thank you. Questions?cyd@boltpeters.com @cydharrellnate@boltpeters.com @boltron

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