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Learning with Games in Medicine and Healthcare

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LEARNINGWITHGAMES
IN MEDICINEANDHEALTHCARE
Bohyun Kim
Associate Director, Library Systems and Knowledge Applications
Unive...

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Gameas aPedagogicalTool
• How effective are games in helping people
in acquiring knowledge and skills that are
difficult t...

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EducationalGame in Medicine
• = Serious game
• = Edutainment
• = Game-based learning
• = Digital game-based learning
• An ...

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Gamification
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Learning with Games in Medicine and Healthcare

  1. 1. LEARNINGWITHGAMES IN MEDICINEANDHEALTHCARE Bohyun Kim Associate Director, Library Systems and Knowledge Applications University of Maryland, Baltimore, HS/HSL @bohyunkim | http://bohyunkim.net Slides: http://www.slideshare.net/bohyunkim/ala2014-game-ig American Library Association 2014 Annual Conference, LasVegas, NV. June 29, 2014
  2. 2. Gameas aPedagogicalTool • How effective are games in helping people in acquiring knowledge and skills that are difficult to obtain, rather than in pursuing sensory stimulation and fun? • Chapter (9): Bohyun Kim, “Learning with Games in Medicine and Healthcare and the Potential Role of Libraries,” in Games in Libraries: Essays onUsing Play to Connect and Instruct., edited by Breanne Kirsch, McFarland, 2014. pp. 152-170.
  3. 3. EducationalGame in Medicine • = Serious game • = Edutainment • = Game-based learning • = Digital game-based learning • An educational game is an attempt to enhance students’ experience and learning outcomes by applying the gaming elements and mechanisms to instruction. • Medicine and healthcare have been the early adopters of game-based learning.
  4. 4. Reception& PedagogicalEfficacy • Students and practitioners in health sciences and healthcare find games appealing. (Also patients) • Games appear to have a positive impact on the students’ perceptions of and attitudes towards a subject studied. • Games generally enhance student enjoyment and may improve long-term retention of information. • More methodically rigorous studies (RCTs) are necessary to properly assess the effectiveness of games in comparison to traditional lecture method.
  5. 5. Designingthe‘Flow’experience • Fully immersed in activities with a feeling of energized focus, full involvement, and enjoyment in the process of the activity. (- Mihály Csíkszentmihályi) • Control, task, feedback, improvement, progress • Usability • Logistics (Support of instructors) • Not all serious games in medicine and health sciences are technologically sophisticated or graphically elaborate like many popular commercial video games. • Social element
  6. 6. Variables foraGame’sPedagogicalEfficacy • Types of a game • Arcade – visual processing, speed of response • Adventure – Narrative-driven open-learning with hypothesis testing and problem solving • Simulation – motor skills • RPG - stragety • Jeopardy, board, card, … etc. • Content of learning • Level of learning • Types of a student
  7. 7. ChallengesinGamification • Is the aspect of classroom/library experience in question suitable for gamification? • Is the resulting game experience something the target group would enjoy? • What is the ultimate goal of gamifying this particular aspect of classroom/library experience? • What are the logistical needs that should be met to ensure the success of your gamification project?
  8. 8. ControversyaboutGamificationRewards • Intrinsic vs. extrinsic motivation • How to channel motivation into meaning? • Example: Andrew Agassi from Game Frame by Aaron Dignan
  9. 9. Importanceof Execution • Gamification alone does not guarantee student engagement or learning. • A clear goal, careful planning, and skillful execution are necessary for the success of a gamification project. • More research is needed about how and when to best use games to improve instructional outcomes and motivation.
  10. 10. Moreinformationandbibliography • See the book chapter. Chapter (9): Bohyun Kim, “Learning with Games in Medicine and Healthcare and the Potential Role of Libraries,” in Games in Libraries: Essays onUsing Play to Connect and Instruct., edited by Breanne Kirsch, McFarland, 2014. pp. 152-170. • http://books.google.com/books?id=XV WoAgAAQBAJ&lpg=PA1&ots=CP4Ml mfe9Q&pg=PA152#v=onepage&q&f=f alse (Google Books)
  11. 11. Questions? Tally, the cat-like husky. Source: http://imgur.com/a/0KoeX

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